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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home+Living | February 4, 2011
When it comes to doors, knobs, floors, molding and such for the home, discussions typically focus on the history of styles. But when it comes to tile, the conversation is about what's happening now. Aided by new technology, tile today is more eco-friendly and more widely available in a vast range of finishes and textures. As a hard, watertight surface applied to floors and walls, ceramic, stone and porcelain have been commonly used for thousands of years. In some ways, not much has changed.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
In the early days of the HIV/AIDS crisis, when diagnoses were far more likely to kill than they are today, those in Baltimore who lost their fight with the dreaded disease were memorialized with small tiles mounted in the lobby of Chase Brexton Health Care in Mount Vernon. On Thursday, as Chase Brexton prepares to move to its new offices in the historic Monumental Life Building, about 75 family members and friends of those memorialized in the "Wall of Courage" took a candlelight march to mark the transfer of the memorial.
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NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | August 24, 2003
It may seem odd that two sisters created a Web business called Five Sisters. But it's really not. Maryland-based siblings Lori Mellendick, the artist, and Stephanie McClure, sales and marketing manager, are two of five sisters. Simple as that. Five Sisters: Fine Art and Painted Tiles offers hand-painted ceramic tiles featuring an array of themes, including new-baby, wedding, family-name, seasons, food, hobby and sports. All tiles are personalized with names or images of the customer's choosing.
NEWS
For The Baltimore Sun and For The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
When 302 Glenrae Drive in the heart of Old Catonsville went on the market March 27, 2013, it didn't remain there long. Only three days, in fact. The Bob & Ronna Team of Long & Foster Realtors brought a potential buyer to see the home on that very day, and a bid was placed immediately. "Not only that, it listed and sold at the same price — $425, 000," Ronna Corman-Chew said. "This is an incredible, completely remodeled three-bed and two-bath split-level with a retro flair," Bob Chew said.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 14, 1993
Three thousand ceramic tiles made by potter Norma Wallis will form the only work of art on the entire light rail line.Ms. Wallis formed the interlocking tiles by hand and fired them. They'll be laid in a small plaza at the Mount Washington light rail station. The terra cotta decoration will feature flowers and insects indigenous to this woodsy, old Northwest Baltimore neighborhood.Ms. Wallis says the project "was very much worked out by the neighborhood."Ms. Wallis' studio, on Smith Avenue in Mount Washington, is in the Baltimore Clayworks, an old Enoch Pratt Free Library branch where many local ceramicists have their potter's wheels and kilns.
FEATURES
By Gene Austin and Gene Austin,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 13, 1993
Self-adhesive vinyl 12-inch tiles give do-it-yourselfers a relatively simple way to resurface floors, but careful planning and installation are needed to ensure an attractive and lasting job.One virtue of self-adhesive tiles is that they can be installed over many smooth, clean, dry floors without elaborate preparations. Suitable surfaces for direct installation include existing vinyl or vinyl-asbestos tiles and firm vinyl-sheet flooring. Tiles should not be installed over a cushioned vinyl-sheet floor with a soft or springy surface.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1999
At first glance, the brightly painted tiles are just another after-school art project. But mortared into the sidewalk of Fells Point's small Latino business district, the ceramic squares mark a growing community's efforts to stake out a spot in Baltimore's cultural mix."It's a chance to present ourselves to the Baltimore community," artist Angelica Pozo said yesterday, as she and a group of Latino schoolchildren unveiled a series of hand-painted "tree surrounds" on South Broadway."Hearing that the community is not very visible, I especially wanted a permanent piece out in public for viewing, rather than in the lobby of some building," said Pozo, who came from Cleveland to tutor the Baltimore youngsters.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 27, 1997
This week, a couple in Washington will sit in their Jacuzzi and admire a tiled mural depicting a desert scene from the movie "Lawrence of Arabia." Soon, the owner of a seafood market in Potomac will have tiled counter tops adorned with rockfish, red snapper, crawling crabs and sole.These customers and many individuals and businesses have commissioned projects by Gooseneck Designs, a Westminster company that has a history as rich as the unique tiles it creates.The company, owned by Jackie Smith, began as a bet in 1986.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 5, 2003
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was warned in 1990 that the protective tiles around the shuttle's wheel wells were particularly vulnerable to catastrophic failure, partly because of their proximity to fuel tanks and the shuttle's hydraulic system. The study, conducted by experts at Stanford University and Carnegie-Mellon and financed by NASA, also identified ice that builds up on the super-cold external fuel tank as a major source of debris that could fall on the tiles and trigger a cascade of failures that could doom the spacecraft.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1997
An irritating odor is lingering in several areas of Swansfield Elementary School this week, likely because of trace chemicals left behind by maintenance work done during spring break, Howard County school officials said.The odor poses no danger to students, teachers or staff, officials said, but some parents say they're concerned and at least a couple of families have pulled their children from the west Columbia elementary this week."Primarily, it's just an annoying odor," said Associate Superintendent Sydney Cousin.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
Kitchen backsplashes are a popular kitchen upgrade, right up there with a fancy stone countertops. Tile and glass are probably the easiest and the most common — even the big-box stores carry them now for DIYers. And the Internet is filled with photo galleries for inspiration. But what Jackie Smith and her architect husband, Chris, do for their customers is off the grid. (Excuse the tile pun.) "I ask them what would make them smile when they come down for their morning coffee.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
There is plenty of material to choose from when creating a kitchen backsplash. Glass, tile, embossed concrete, punched tin, stainless steel, curved glass, subway tiles, marble, natural stone. Designer Laura Kimball of LCK Interiors offers some advice for those planning a kitchen backsplash and how to coordinate it with your countertop. Granite counters will always get a "wow!" reaction, but often the marriage of counter and backsplash ends in irreconcilable differences. A few concepts to consider before making lasting and expensive mismatches: •Granite or composite stone counters can stand on their own; no need for the 4-inch matching backsplash if you are adding a full tile or stone backsplash.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | October 4, 2011
If your next remodeling project includes Travertine floors in the bath or mosaic backsplashes for the kitchen, The Tile Shop has the stuff homeowners dream of, from grout to glass and everything in between. The Tile Shop, in the retail center at the intersection of Snowden River Parkway and Oakland Mills Road, is a 20,000-square-foot showroom filled with a wide variety of floor and wall tile options, along with coordinating trim pieces, stone vessel sinks, switchplate covers and fixtures.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2011
Robert L. Bunting Sr., a veteran of World War II who was wounded at Iwo Jima and later became a tile setter, died of lung disease April 17 at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in downtown Baltimore. He was 87 and lived in Hamilton. Born in Baltimore and raised on Forrester Avenue, he attended a public vocational school and assembled aircraft at the old Glenn L. Martin plant in Middle River. He joined the Marine Corps during World War II and served in the Pacific. He was wounded in the left arm during the Battle of Iwo Jima and spent two years at Bethesda Naval Hospital.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
From the sidewalk in front of the Butchers Hill home of Jay Rubin and Frank Mondimore, a reminder unique to Maryland sport gives passers-by pause. Stubby and banged-up duckpins, alongside shiny bowling trophies, line the sills inside of two street-level windows. Next to that hometown image, a flower urn sits on a concrete slab in front of double oak doors, their arched windows reflecting the corner grocery store across the street. The brick exterior looks new, providing a clue that this house is a relatively recent arrival to the block.
NEWS
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home+Living | February 4, 2011
When it comes to doors, knobs, floors, molding and such for the home, discussions typically focus on the history of styles. But when it comes to tile, the conversation is about what's happening now. Aided by new technology, tile today is more eco-friendly and more widely available in a vast range of finishes and textures. As a hard, watertight surface applied to floors and walls, ceramic, stone and porcelain have been commonly used for thousands of years. In some ways, not much has changed.
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
Shady Side Elementary School has been declared safe for occupancy after ceiling tiles containing asbestos were cleared, but the contractor responsible for disturbing those tiles could face charges from the state Department of the Environment, officials said. Workers with Fitzgerald Electric Co. in Baltimore disrupted the tiles Saturday while installing piping and conduit for electrical outlets, Alex Szachnowicz, acting director of facilities for Anne Arundel County Public Schools, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 1, 2005
HOUSTON - NASA managers are expected to decide today whether to have spacewalkers do precautionary maintenance on shuttle Discovery's heat shielding. Engineers have spent the six days since the launch analyzing images and inspection data to make sure there are no issues that could threaten the shuttle's planned Aug. 8 homecoming. Mission managers were close to concluding yesterday that Discovery's heat-resistant tiles and thermal panels had not sustained any significant damage. One final concern, however, has yet to be resolved.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2010
Agricultural specialists with the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol say they have intercepted a new foreign insect pest hiding in imported cargo at the Port of Baltimore. The discovery of Stenopterapion tenue in a shipment of Italian tiles was a first for Baltimore, but it marked the 10 t h time since 2005 the bug has been discovered in cargo shipped to U.S. ports. A wood-boring weevil found in Europe, S. tenue was discovered Dec. 6. It was identified by a U.S. Department of Agriculture entomologist last week.
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