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NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 25, 2005
Tilapia is for the timid. A freshwater fish, tilapia stays fresh longer than saltwater-fish varieties during shipping. Tilapia's mild, firm-textured flesh is adaptable to a variety of cooking methods, including baking, broiling, grilling, poaching, braising and steaming. Tilapia can be substituted for sole, snapper, flounder, cod, sea bass and orange roughy. Mediterranean Fish Fillets Makes 6 servings 1 teaspoon olive oil 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/4 cup chopped green pepper 1 cup sliced mushrooms 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 Roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped 1 teaspoon each: dried basil leaves and oregano leaves 1/4 teaspoon sugar 1/8 teaspoon crushed red-pepper flakes dash salt 1/4 cup white wine 1 1/2 pounds tilapia fish fillets 2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese Heat oil in saucepan over medium-high heat.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 3, 2012
The latest healthy recipe comes from nutritionist Joy Bauer. The Baked Tilapia With Spicy Tomato-Pineapple Relish is an easy dinnertime meal. It can also be made with other white fish such as haddock or cod, Bauer says on her website. The entire dish takes just about 20 minutes to prepare. If you have healthy recipes you would like to share send them to me at andrea.walker@baltsun.com INGREDIENTS 4 fish, tilapia, (6-ounce) fillets 1/4 teaspoon salt, Kosher 1/2 cup(s)
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NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | February 6, 2008
Thai peanut sauce and coconut milk add an intriguing flavor to tilapia. For this recipe, they are simmered to gently coat the fish. Peanut sauce is the base for many Thai dishes and is made from roasted peanuts, soy sauce and spices. I choose a thick one when it is available. Coconut milk is made by mixing shredded coconut with boiling water, letting it steep and then straining it. Fortunately, both peanut sauce and coconut milk are available ready-made. Serve this dish with basmati rice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2012
Ordering fish and chips at a place named Basta Pasta might seem like a stretch. But in fairness, the Lutherville restaurant's full name is Basta Pasta Italian & Seafood Restaurant, and it ably handles both fish and pasta. Judging from a recent order of fish and chips, it's clear the fry cook knows his business - the coating on the fresh filet was crisp, without a hint of oil visible. The fish is actually local rockfish, which elevates the classic English street fare to sit-down restaurant status.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | September 6, 1992
HUNTINGTOWN -- When Larry Entzian envisions his future h sees fish, tilapia fish.He sees giant bubbling tanks brimming with hot water, stocked with tilapia fish. He sees them growing by the thousands and being shipped by the truckload to markets up and down the East Coast. He sees that he, the son and grandson of farmers, might continue the family tradition in a way his grandfather would never have imagined: fish farming, a burgeoning Maryland industry.But first things first. Mr. Entzian knows he's selling an exotic product, a fish that originated in Africa whose name few people have heard and even fewer can pronounce.
BUSINESS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
POCOMOKE CITY -- At first glance, Aquamar Industries looks pretty unassuming -- just a couple of big gray sheds in a clearing off Route 113 in Worcester County.But those gray sheds house the leading edge of aquaculture in Maryland -- 130,000 or so tilapia, a fish with a funny name, a biblical past and a future so promising that it's been dubbed "the broiler chicken of the fish industry."Tilapia, virtually unknown in Maryland five years ago, are now the fastest growing segment of the state's $20 million-a-year aquaculture industry.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1999
When people walk into the huge rectangular building filled with row upon row of fish tanks, they almost always ask the two young farmers the same question: "Where did you get your degrees in marine biology?""We didn't," Randy Mattson says, laughing, looking down at the slimy rubber boots he once would have predicted would be wingtips. "We're not exactly farmers. We're businessmen."About two years ago, Mattson and his business partner, Scott Lee, were shrewd enough to spot a potential moneymaker.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | October 1, 2008
It's a challenge to make a fish dish for four and stay under a $12 total - unless you use tilapia. I thought this recipe from the new book Two Dudes, One Pan, originally designed for grouper, might work with any white fish, even thin fillets of tilapia. The browned butter and salty capers liven up this pedestrian fish, which cooks quickly. If you can find it on sale, baby bok choy makes a nice accompaniment. Spray with an olive-oil cooking spray and grill for a few minutes on a grill pan. shopping list Tilapia: $7.98 Butter: 32 cents Capers: 80 cents Lemons: $1 Parsley: 5 cents Baby bok choy: $1.50 From the pantry: salt, cooking spray TOTAL: $11.65* Note: Prices are calculated based on the amount of each ingredient used in the recipe.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2011
The aquarium in the living room of Meir and Leah Lazar's Baltimore County home isn't just for decoration. The tilapia and bluegills packed into the 50-gallon glass tank are waiting their turn to wind up on dinner plates. Out back, Meir Lazar is putting the finishing touches on a bigger new home for the fish inside a plastic-covered greenhouse. There, he hopes, the waste from the fish he's tending will help him raise enough lettuce, tomatoes and other produce to feed his family of five year-round.
NEWS
By Adriane B. Miller and Adriane B. Miller,Contributing Writer | October 3, 1993
If you like fish, better eat up. By the year 2000, the world's oceans, lakes and rivers could be fished out, resulting in a predicted 2-billion-pound shortfall of seafood products, according to a U.N. report.But not if people like Doug Burdette can help it.The Harford County native and owner of Maryland Pride Farm in Aberdeen has developed a method for raising fish in tanks that has captured the attention of the federal government, universities, restaurants and fishmongers all over the country.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2011
The aquarium in the living room of Meir and Leah Lazar's Baltimore County home isn't just for decoration. The tilapia and bluegills packed into the 50-gallon glass tank are waiting their turn to wind up on dinner plates. Out back, Meir Lazar is putting the finishing touches on a bigger new home for the fish inside a plastic-covered greenhouse. There, he hopes, the waste from the fish he's tending will help him raise enough lettuce, tomatoes and other produce to feed his family of five year-round.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 31, 2011
Here are more factors to consider the next time you buy fish at a store or order it at a restaurant. Seafood can be a great choice for health reasons, and it's tasty to boot. But overfishing threatens some fish stocks and contaminents that accumulate in some species requires us to limit how much we can eat -- particularly women and young children. But even following the "Super Green" recommendations from the Monteray Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program won't help you if the fish is mislabeled in the seafood case --- replaced with options that are cheaper or more readily available.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | October 1, 2008
It's a challenge to make a fish dish for four and stay under a $12 total - unless you use tilapia. I thought this recipe from the new book Two Dudes, One Pan, originally designed for grouper, might work with any white fish, even thin fillets of tilapia. The browned butter and salty capers liven up this pedestrian fish, which cooks quickly. If you can find it on sale, baby bok choy makes a nice accompaniment. Spray with an olive-oil cooking spray and grill for a few minutes on a grill pan. shopping list Tilapia: $7.98 Butter: 32 cents Capers: 80 cents Lemons: $1 Parsley: 5 cents Baby bok choy: $1.50 From the pantry: salt, cooking spray TOTAL: $11.65* Note: Prices are calculated based on the amount of each ingredient used in the recipe.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | February 6, 2008
Thai peanut sauce and coconut milk add an intriguing flavor to tilapia. For this recipe, they are simmered to gently coat the fish. Peanut sauce is the base for many Thai dishes and is made from roasted peanuts, soy sauce and spices. I choose a thick one when it is available. Coconut milk is made by mixing shredded coconut with boiling water, letting it steep and then straining it. Fortunately, both peanut sauce and coconut milk are available ready-made. Serve this dish with basmati rice.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 25, 2005
Tilapia is for the timid. A freshwater fish, tilapia stays fresh longer than saltwater-fish varieties during shipping. Tilapia's mild, firm-textured flesh is adaptable to a variety of cooking methods, including baking, broiling, grilling, poaching, braising and steaming. Tilapia can be substituted for sole, snapper, flounder, cod, sea bass and orange roughy. Mediterranean Fish Fillets Makes 6 servings 1 teaspoon olive oil 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/4 cup chopped green pepper 1 cup sliced mushrooms 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 Roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped 1 teaspoon each: dried basil leaves and oregano leaves 1/4 teaspoon sugar 1/8 teaspoon crushed red-pepper flakes dash salt 1/4 cup white wine 1 1/2 pounds tilapia fish fillets 2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese Heat oil in saucepan over medium-high heat.
NEWS
By Louis Sahagun and Louis Sahagun,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 4, 2003
SALTON SEA, Calif. - Scientists have uncovered a distressing secret about the lakebed of the Salton Sea: Portions of it are covered with a 50-foot-thick layer of silt the consistency of peanut butter. That revelation is particularly troubling for California's largest lake, a place of promise and despair that has endured three decades of scientific study and political haggling. The latest findings place in jeopardy a proposal by state and federal agencies to build an 8 1/2 -mile dike across the desolate and smelly lake to stave off ecological disaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2012
Ordering fish and chips at a place named Basta Pasta might seem like a stretch. But in fairness, the Lutherville restaurant's full name is Basta Pasta Italian & Seafood Restaurant, and it ably handles both fish and pasta. Judging from a recent order of fish and chips, it's clear the fry cook knows his business - the coating on the fresh filet was crisp, without a hint of oil visible. The fish is actually local rockfish, which elevates the classic English street fare to sit-down restaurant status.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 3, 1993
Fish have constituencies. Take cod, for instance. Bodybuilders love cod.They eat it by the plateful because they think it will help them display their muscles. It seems that when you are building your body, you want to eat food like cod, with a lot of protein but not much sodium. Sodium retains water, and the retained water sort of "clouds" your skin and blurs the best possible view of major muscles. And so, among the muscle-popping crowd, cod is a favorite fish.This insight came from Charles W. Parks Jr., manager of the Southern Seafood store in Dundalk.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1999
When people walk into the huge rectangular building filled with row upon row of fish tanks, they almost always ask the two young farmers the same question: "Where did you get your degrees in marine biology?""We didn't," Randy Mattson says, laughing, looking down at the slimy rubber boots he once would have predicted would be wingtips. "We're not exactly farmers. We're businessmen."About two years ago, Mattson and his business partner, Scott Lee, were shrewd enough to spot a potential moneymaker.
BUSINESS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
POCOMOKE CITY -- At first glance, Aquamar Industries looks pretty unassuming -- just a couple of big gray sheds in a clearing off Route 113 in Worcester County.But those gray sheds house the leading edge of aquaculture in Maryland -- 130,000 or so tilapia, a fish with a funny name, a biblical past and a future so promising that it's been dubbed "the broiler chicken of the fish industry."Tilapia, virtually unknown in Maryland five years ago, are now the fastest growing segment of the state's $20 million-a-year aquaculture industry.
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