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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - Saddam Hussein has come home. That, at least, is the conviction of the American soldiers hunting him. They say they have twice come close to capturing or killing Hussein here in recent weeks. Alone and on the run, the soldiers say, Hussein has most likely fallen back to his hometown, where his family and tribal kin are among the small group of people he still believes he can trust. With that belief in mind, the American military has begun an extraordinary manhunt across the arid plains surrounding Tikrit, Hussein's birthplace, involving hundreds of soldiers and sometimes several raids each night, on homes, farmhouses and other places suspected of harboring followers of Hussein, and possibly the man himself.
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NEWS
June 16, 2014
The latest Iraq crisis is no occasion for inter-party sniping or for Washington's talking heads to find friendly microphones to offer their opinions about whether U.S. forces should have remained in Iraq ("Obama weighing action in Iraq: Militants' sweep toward Baghdad threatens to embroil region," June 13). We had long overstayed our welcome there, no matter how many times we shifted the goal posts in pursuit of some nebulous victory. Another by-product of that unfortunate affair was that we afforded a chance for al-Qaida to engage us militarily instead of mainly confining itself to terrorist activities.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 29, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq -- The birthday party's over for Saddam Hussein, even here in his hometown and political stronghold 110 miles north of Baghdad. Hussein turned 66 yesterday, assuming he's still alive, but no bash was thrown at the gleaming, marble-columned complex built for the annual nationwide celebration of his birth on April 28. For the first time in years, the only noisemakers were the U.S. tanks clattering around beneath the big red "28" emblazoned on...
NEWS
By James Janega and James Janega,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 25, 2005
TIKRIT, Iraq - Sgt. Anthony Ramos picked himself off the ground and fired a full magazine at the corner where yesterday morning's second suicide car bomber had come from, in case there were more. Then he sank to his knees, a heavy metal fragment lodged in his elbow guard, his breath stolen by the blast, and a second U.S. soldier sprinted up the block to pull him to safety by a strap on his vest. Around him, four Iraqi policemen and two civilians were dead, in addition to the suicide bomber.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 27, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - U.S. soldiers have arrested the wife and daughter of Izzat Ibrahim, a former Iraqi general who is believed to have been helping loyalists to deposed Iraqi President Saddam Hussein regroup and coordinating intensified attacks against the U.S. led-coalition, Maj. Gen. Ray Odierno said yesterday. The two women, along with the son of Ibrahim's doctor, were detained by soldiers from the Army's 4th Infantry Division in a raid on a house near Samarra late Tuesday and were being held for interrogation.
NEWS
June 16, 2014
The latest Iraq crisis is no occasion for inter-party sniping or for Washington's talking heads to find friendly microphones to offer their opinions about whether U.S. forces should have remained in Iraq ("Obama weighing action in Iraq: Militants' sweep toward Baghdad threatens to embroil region," June 13). We had long overstayed our welcome there, no matter how many times we shifted the goal posts in pursuit of some nebulous victory. Another by-product of that unfortunate affair was that we afforded a chance for al-Qaida to engage us militarily instead of mainly confining itself to terrorist activities.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - Fresh outbreaks of looting and civil unrest swept across Iraq yesterday, even as the threat appeared to be fading that remnants of Saddam Hussein's army would mount one last stand against U.S. forces on the battlefield north of Baghdad. Scattered fighting continued in the Iraqi capital and many other parts of the country as pockets of regime loyalists battled U.S.-led troops. "There is much work to be done still in military operations," said Brig. Gen. Vincent Brooks of U.S. Central Command in Doha, Qatar.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - With U.S. troops moving cautiously toward placing the city under siege, Iraqi television last night showed a 12-minute film of a relaxed and cheerful man who it said was Saddam Hussein strolling with apparent nonchalance around Baghdad and stopping to exchange greetings with ordinary Iraqis. The footage, shown several times during the evening, appeared to be Iraq's riposte to conjecture among officials in Washington that the 65-year-old ruler might have been killed or incapacitated in the American missile strikes that opened the war, more than two weeks ago. The Pentagon said at the time that the war's opening salvos March 20 were aimed at a meeting of top Iraqi leaders in a military compound in southern Baghdad, which intelligence had indicated might have included Hussein.
NEWS
February 28, 1996
QUITE WHY Lt. Gen. Hussein Kamel Hassan fled Iraq for Jordan last August remains a mystery. The son-in-law and weapons procurer of the dictator Saddam Hussein had no credibility as a principled opponent of the regime he then sought to overthrow. He would have been nobody except for the favors Saddam Hussein bestowed. But an even greater enigma was his return.Nobody can have known as well as Kamel Hassan how treacherous and vengeful Saddam Hussein will be. Nobody can have had less faith in the promise of forgiveness.
NEWS
By Paul Salopek and Paul Salopek,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - American troops have uncovered huge weapons caches in Saddam Hussein's tribal hometown of Tikrit in recent days, a discovery that bolsters the theory that the deposed president may have planned his last stand there. U.S. troops patrolling through the town cemetery on Tuesday stumbled across a huge system of bunkers and trenches among the graves that held ammunition, rocket-propelled grenades and SAM 6 and SAM 7 surface-to-air missiles. Earlier this week, 50,000 rifles and rocket launchers - many still in their crates - were uncovered in unused patient wards at the local military hospital.
NEWS
By Matthew McAllester and Matthew McAllester,NEWSDAY | January 28, 2005
TIKRIT, Iraq - Etched into the pastel plasterwork, high above the men sitting around a huge conference table, were the Arabic initials of Saddam Hussein, the man whose home this was two years ago. The cavernous room is in one of the 19 vast palaces the now-imprisoned leader built for himself in his hometown. Translating for the American general chairing the meeting was one of Hussein's former army brigadier generals. To the American's right was another of Hussein's generals, this one proudly noting that he had fought the Americans until the last day of the invasion in 2003.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 27, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - U.S. soldiers have arrested the wife and daughter of Izzat Ibrahim, a former Iraqi general who is believed to have been helping loyalists to deposed Iraqi President Saddam Hussein regroup and coordinating intensified attacks against the U.S. led-coalition, Maj. Gen. Ray Odierno said yesterday. The two women, along with the son of Ibrahim's doctor, were detained by soldiers from the Army's 4th Infantry Division in a raid on a house near Samarra late Tuesday and were being held for interrogation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - Saddam Hussein has come home. That, at least, is the conviction of the American soldiers hunting him. They say they have twice come close to capturing or killing Hussein here in recent weeks. Alone and on the run, the soldiers say, Hussein has most likely fallen back to his hometown, where his family and tribal kin are among the small group of people he still believes he can trust. With that belief in mind, the American military has begun an extraordinary manhunt across the arid plains surrounding Tikrit, Hussein's birthplace, involving hundreds of soldiers and sometimes several raids each night, on homes, farmhouses and other places suspected of harboring followers of Hussein, and possibly the man himself.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 29, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq -- The birthday party's over for Saddam Hussein, even here in his hometown and political stronghold 110 miles north of Baghdad. Hussein turned 66 yesterday, assuming he's still alive, but no bash was thrown at the gleaming, marble-columned complex built for the annual nationwide celebration of his birth on April 28. For the first time in years, the only noisemakers were the U.S. tanks clattering around beneath the big red "28" emblazoned on...
NEWS
By Paul Salopek and Paul Salopek,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - American troops have uncovered huge weapons caches in Saddam Hussein's tribal hometown of Tikrit in recent days, a discovery that bolsters the theory that the deposed president may have planned his last stand there. U.S. troops patrolling through the town cemetery on Tuesday stumbled across a huge system of bunkers and trenches among the graves that held ammunition, rocket-propelled grenades and SAM 6 and SAM 7 surface-to-air missiles. Earlier this week, 50,000 rifles and rocket launchers - many still in their crates - were uncovered in unused patient wards at the local military hospital.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - The breeze off the Tigris blew through the empty halls of Saddam Hussein's grandest palace yesterday, its once fearsome opulence reduced, it seemed, to the most crushing sort of banality. Here on the bookshelf, for instance, were The Collected Works of Saddam Hussein, Volumes I through X, barely cracked. In the next room was a tablet of paper, imposing in its plainness, labeled simply "The President." Then, in the bathroom, were signs of a hurried exit: a cabinet door open, a crumpled towel on the floor, a pair of men's underwear still hanging on the rack.
NEWS
By Matthew McAllester and Matthew McAllester,NEWSDAY | January 28, 2005
TIKRIT, Iraq - Etched into the pastel plasterwork, high above the men sitting around a huge conference table, were the Arabic initials of Saddam Hussein, the man whose home this was two years ago. The cavernous room is in one of the 19 vast palaces the now-imprisoned leader built for himself in his hometown. Translating for the American general chairing the meeting was one of Hussein's former army brigadier generals. To the American's right was another of Hussein's generals, this one proudly noting that he had fought the Americans until the last day of the invasion in 2003.
NEWS
By James Janega and James Janega,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 25, 2005
TIKRIT, Iraq - Sgt. Anthony Ramos picked himself off the ground and fired a full magazine at the corner where yesterday morning's second suicide car bomber had come from, in case there were more. Then he sank to his knees, a heavy metal fragment lodged in his elbow guard, his breath stolen by the blast, and a second U.S. soldier sprinted up the block to pull him to safety by a strap on his vest. Around him, four Iraqi policemen and two civilians were dead, in addition to the suicide bomber.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - U.S. Marines advancing on the final Iraqi stronghold of Tikrit yesterday rescued seven bedraggled but healthy American prisoners of war, flying them to safety more than three weeks after they were captured by enemy forces. The Marines found the POWs about five miles south of Tikrit, after Iraqi soldiers who had been guarding the prisoners surrendered and led them to the prisoners. The POWs included two helicopter crewmen and five members of an Army maintenance company that had been ambushed near the city of Nasiriyah.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - Fresh outbreaks of looting and civil unrest swept across Iraq yesterday, even as the threat appeared to be fading that remnants of Saddam Hussein's army would mount one last stand against U.S. forces on the battlefield north of Baghdad. Scattered fighting continued in the Iraqi capital and many other parts of the country as pockets of regime loyalists battled U.S.-led troops. "There is much work to be done still in military operations," said Brig. Gen. Vincent Brooks of U.S. Central Command in Doha, Qatar.
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