Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTiki Bar
IN THE NEWS

Tiki Bar

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2000
SOLOMONS -- Basically, it's just a block party. Like the Queen Elizabeth is just a boat. This weekend, thousands jammed -- or tried to -- into a 94-seat bar on the harbor that's done up to look like a little grass shack. The crowd, most of them in their 30s, spilled onto the parking lot, the street out front and onto a pier for what has become Southern Maryland's rite of spring -- opening day at the Tiki Bar. People come from next door and from as far away as California and Alaska to down uncounted gallons of the bar's signature drinks -- mai tais and Kokomos -- and catch up with old friends they haven't seen since October, when owner John Taylor closed for the winter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Date: April 20 Her story: Casey Schachter, 33, grew up in Leonardtown in St. Mary's County. She works for a government contractor and also teaches yoga at Evolve Yoga + Wellness in California, Md. Her mother, Carol Schachter, and her mother's fiance, Charlie Bass, live in Callaway. Her father, Steve Carey, and his wife, Kim Carey, live in upstate New York. His story: Brian Bowen, 36, grew up in Lusby in Calvert County. He is a firefighter in Washington. His parents, Linda and George Bowen, live in Lusby.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 11, 2002
THERE are certain restaurants worth visiting for their atmosphere alone. Magothy Seafood Crab Deck and Tiki Bar is one of those. It's a relaxed place on the banks of the Magothy River that evokes a fishing camp or summertime family picnics with the cast of The Wonder Years. The restaurant is a large glorified tent plopped in the midst of Ferry Point Marina. Rows of picnic tables, covered with bright vinyl tablecloths, share space with a thatched tiki bar decked with tiny red crab lights and authentic crab traps.
BUSINESS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
The owners of Barrett's Grill at the Hunt Valley Towne Centre will open a restaurant in the Glyndon location that was the site of Mia Carolina until earlier this year. The new restaurant will be called Glyndon Grill , according to Michael Sipes, who co-owns both Barrett's Grill and the new restaurant with John Barrett. Glyndon Grill will operate with a different menu and chef than Barrett's but will also focus on in-house, made-from-scratch preparations, said Sipes, who added that Glyndon Grill will also likely be more casual than Barrett's Grill, which he and Barrett have owned since 2011.
SPORTS
March 20, 2007
On former Oriole Sidney Ponson, who criticized Baltimore fans This town gave Sidney more chances than anyone else would. He did himself in by being a subpar player and, more importantly, a subpar person. All the team did for him and now he talks bad about them. ... Make him go back to Aruba and run a tiki bar. Fans kept coming to watch [Ponson] pitch, even though [he] didn't give them a ... thing to cheer about.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Date: April 20 Her story: Casey Schachter, 33, grew up in Leonardtown in St. Mary's County. She works for a government contractor and also teaches yoga at Evolve Yoga + Wellness in California, Md. Her mother, Carol Schachter, and her mother's fiance, Charlie Bass, live in Callaway. Her father, Steve Carey, and his wife, Kim Carey, live in upstate New York. His story: Brian Bowen, 36, grew up in Lusby in Calvert County. He is a firefighter in Washington. His parents, Linda and George Bowen, live in Lusby.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 15, 2012
If you're happy and you know it and your face really shows it, you must be a resident of Solomons Island in Calvert County. Coastal Living magazine's special 15th anniversary issue ranks the southern Maryland waterfront village no. 15 on a list of "America's Happiest Seaside Towns. " The magazine points to the town's history of fishing and exploration, as well as its boardwalk, sculpture gardens and of course, its hospitality. It also notes that Solomons Victorian Inn is the place to stay.
BUSINESS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
The owners of Barrett's Grill at the Hunt Valley Towne Centre will open a restaurant in the Glyndon location that was the site of Mia Carolina until earlier this year. The new restaurant will be called Glyndon Grill , according to Michael Sipes, who co-owns both Barrett's Grill and the new restaurant with John Barrett. Glyndon Grill will operate with a different menu and chef than Barrett's but will also focus on in-house, made-from-scratch preparations, said Sipes, who added that Glyndon Grill will also likely be more casual than Barrett's Grill, which he and Barrett have owned since 2011.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
A voyage down the Southern Maryland shoreline tells the whole story.One spot is so small and remote, its downtown is a blur to passing travelers. Ice. Bait. Chum. Fuel. Gone in a drive-by second.A few miles away, an old shore town is remade. Builders rip up abandoned fishing shanties. Commuters roar down newly paved roads. Jet skiers rumble on the waterways. The past is only a name on a tombstone. The rest is just a memory.As Calvert, St. Mary's and Charles counties undergo one of the biggest population explosions in the nation, towns on the shore are bracing for change.
NEWS
By Betty Hallock and Betty Hallock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 29, 2008
She's wearing white knee socks and black high-heeled Mary Janes, a ruffled headband, and a short petticoat-lined dress with puff sleeves, rounded collar and a patch-pocket apron, and she's here to pour your tea and serve cucumber finger sandwiches. French maid not your thing? Go dinosaur. A waitress in a tattered-hem cheetah-print miniskirt, black tank top, leather tool belt and a plastic bone-and-bead necklace, the pink bows on her fishnet socks peeking over Uggs, will bring you a big bowl of "three-flavored sauce chicken" and a plate of grilled sausages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
When Stacey Barich turned the modest dining room of her Parkville home into a tiki bar inspired by the 1930s, it became a project of passion for the 40-year-old photographer. Pairing her love of vintage culture with a growing obsession with authenticity, Barich quickly found herself on eBay, searching and bidding for additions to the new favorite room in her house. The research and collecting quickly led Barich to the world of handcrafted cocktails. "Once that happens, you're picking up old vintage books on how to make things," Barich said.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 15, 2012
If you're happy and you know it and your face really shows it, you must be a resident of Solomons Island in Calvert County. Coastal Living magazine's special 15th anniversary issue ranks the southern Maryland waterfront village no. 15 on a list of "America's Happiest Seaside Towns. " The magazine points to the town's history of fishing and exploration, as well as its boardwalk, sculpture gardens and of course, its hospitality. It also notes that Solomons Victorian Inn is the place to stay.
TRAVEL
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2011
On a Friday night this summer, Seacrets was teeming with people dancing and drinking on its patios and dance floors and at its 18 bars. By now the 22-year-old venue has eluded easy definition. With a sprawling fiefdom that includes a radio station, several restaurants, a hotel, five stages for live music, a swim-up bar and even Seacrets -branded water bottles, it's more of a theme park, a playground where Maryland and the region vacations every year. "I've been coming here for years because everybody else is here.
NEWS
By Betty Hallock and Betty Hallock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 29, 2008
She's wearing white knee socks and black high-heeled Mary Janes, a ruffled headband, and a short petticoat-lined dress with puff sleeves, rounded collar and a patch-pocket apron, and she's here to pour your tea and serve cucumber finger sandwiches. French maid not your thing? Go dinosaur. A waitress in a tattered-hem cheetah-print miniskirt, black tank top, leather tool belt and a plastic bone-and-bead necklace, the pink bows on her fishnet socks peeking over Uggs, will bring you a big bowl of "three-flavored sauce chicken" and a plate of grilled sausages.
SPORTS
March 20, 2007
On former Oriole Sidney Ponson, who criticized Baltimore fans This town gave Sidney more chances than anyone else would. He did himself in by being a subpar player and, more importantly, a subpar person. All the team did for him and now he talks bad about them. ... Make him go back to Aruba and run a tiki bar. Fans kept coming to watch [Ponson] pitch, even though [he] didn't give them a ... thing to cheer about.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 11, 2002
THERE are certain restaurants worth visiting for their atmosphere alone. Magothy Seafood Crab Deck and Tiki Bar is one of those. It's a relaxed place on the banks of the Magothy River that evokes a fishing camp or summertime family picnics with the cast of The Wonder Years. The restaurant is a large glorified tent plopped in the midst of Ferry Point Marina. Rows of picnic tables, covered with bright vinyl tablecloths, share space with a thatched tiki bar decked with tiny red crab lights and authentic crab traps.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
When Stacey Barich turned the modest dining room of her Parkville home into a tiki bar inspired by the 1930s, it became a project of passion for the 40-year-old photographer. Pairing her love of vintage culture with a growing obsession with authenticity, Barich quickly found herself on eBay, searching and bidding for additions to the new favorite room in her house. The research and collecting quickly led Barich to the world of handcrafted cocktails. "Once that happens, you're picking up old vintage books on how to make things," Barich said.
TRAVEL
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2011
On a Friday night this summer, Seacrets was teeming with people dancing and drinking on its patios and dance floors and at its 18 bars. By now the 22-year-old venue has eluded easy definition. With a sprawling fiefdom that includes a radio station, several restaurants, a hotel, five stages for live music, a swim-up bar and even Seacrets -branded water bottles, it's more of a theme park, a playground where Maryland and the region vacations every year. "I've been coming here for years because everybody else is here.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2000
SOLOMONS -- Basically, it's just a block party. Like the Queen Elizabeth is just a boat. This weekend, thousands jammed -- or tried to -- into a 94-seat bar on the harbor that's done up to look like a little grass shack. The crowd, most of them in their 30s, spilled onto the parking lot, the street out front and onto a pier for what has become Southern Maryland's rite of spring -- opening day at the Tiki Bar. People come from next door and from as far away as California and Alaska to down uncounted gallons of the bar's signature drinks -- mai tais and Kokomos -- and catch up with old friends they haven't seen since October, when owner John Taylor closed for the winter.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
A voyage down the Southern Maryland shoreline tells the whole story.One spot is so small and remote, its downtown is a blur to passing travelers. Ice. Bait. Chum. Fuel. Gone in a drive-by second.A few miles away, an old shore town is remade. Builders rip up abandoned fishing shanties. Commuters roar down newly paved roads. Jet skiers rumble on the waterways. The past is only a name on a tombstone. The rest is just a memory.As Calvert, St. Mary's and Charles counties undergo one of the biggest population explosions in the nation, towns on the shore are bracing for change.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.