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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 27, 2006
SAN DIEGO -- A cross-border tunnel nearly half a mile long, from a nondescript industrial building in Tijuana to a warehouse in San Diego, is thought to be the longest illegal tunnel ever discovered along the U.S.-Mexican border, federal authorities said yesterday. Stacked near the tunnel - a deep passage with lighting, ventilation and a pulley system - authorities found more than two tons of marijuana. The tunnel is 2,400 feet long and roomy enough for people to run through. U.S. and Mexican authorities, who have found several border-crossing tunnels in recent years, have made no arrests.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | February 1, 2007
At La Tijuana Cantina, a Tex-Mex restaurant in Mount Vernon, our enchiladas, chalupas and fajitas arrived on pretty brick-red ceramic plates, accompanied by a warning. Those little green peppers resting so attractively next to the cilantro sprig and slice of lime are just there for decoration, our waitress said. Eat them at your own risk. Poor:]
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NEWS
By Richard Marosi, Sam Enriquez and Hector Tobar and Richard Marosi, Sam Enriquez and Hector Tobar,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 2007
TIJUANA, Mexico -- Disarmed municipal police patrolled alongside armed state police Friday, a sight that brought some comfort to many in this border city, where municipal police are often equated with corruption and drug-fueled violence. Municipal officers, their holsters empty, directed traffic and made the rounds a day after stopping work in response to being stripped of their weapons by the Mexican military. The army operation in Tijuana and a similar incursion in the southern state of Michoacan, some analysts say, have been a political boon to President Felipe Calderon, who recently took office, enabling him to project an image of strength and decisiveness.
NEWS
By Richard Marosi, Sam Enriquez and Hector Tobar and Richard Marosi, Sam Enriquez and Hector Tobar,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 2007
TIJUANA, Mexico -- Disarmed municipal police patrolled alongside armed state police Friday, a sight that brought some comfort to many in this border city, where municipal police are often equated with corruption and drug-fueled violence. Municipal officers, their holsters empty, directed traffic and made the rounds a day after stopping work in response to being stripped of their weapons by the Mexican military. The army operation in Tijuana and a similar incursion in the southern state of Michoacan, some analysts say, have been a political boon to President Felipe Calderon, who recently took office, enabling him to project an image of strength and decisiveness.
NEWS
By Sam Enriquez and Richard Marosi and Sam Enriquez and Richard Marosi,Los Angeles Times | November 24, 2006
NUEVO LAREDO, Mexico -- The top police officer in this unhinged border city has 300 openings on a 600-member police force, and his fearful greeting gave a big clue about why. "Please, please don't use my name or take a photograph," the interim chief begged. One police chief was killed last year, a second quit in the spring, and no one else appears brave, or foolhardy, enough to work this side of the law in Nuevo Laredo. Mexican President Vicente Fox quietly withdrew the federal police that he had dispatched here with great fanfare last year, leaving the city virtually unprotected in a smuggling war that has claimed 170 lives since January.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2003
One day in 1968 when Juan and Abel Velazquez were 15 years old, their father sat them down and placed before them canvases of black velvet. Jose Velazquez had been a boxer in Mexico City. Later, he taught himself cartooning and, from there, to paint on velvet, which is how he was supporting his family. "Time for playing is over," he told them. "It's time to make money." He took up a brush, dabbed it in pink paint and handed down to his sons the one craft he knew. Starting with a simple classic of Tijuana velvet, he taught them to paint the Pink Panther.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2003
TIJUANA, Mexico - Tucked into a quiet street in the hilly working-class Libertad neighborhood overlooking the crossing to the United States sits a cafe that embodies the changes in this border city. An Internet cafe occupies part of the building. The other half is a dimly lit slice of Vienna or Milan, furnished with a grand piano, a lyre and a Viking helmet. Tijuana, the quintessential border town of liquor stores, auto shops and taco stands, has developed a flourishing opera scene, the product of years of toil by many people for love of the art. This cafe is a visible part.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2002
TIJUANA, Mexico - This is not a whispering kind of town. Vendors along Avenida Revolucion, the border town's main drag, spend much of their days advertising their wares, which range from Viagra to 85-cent draft beers, at the top of their lungs amid a confusing mix of shouted Spanish and English. But there is one thing that causes the vendors to lower their voices these days. "You want a pipe? For marijuana?" whispers Cesar Fernandez as he leads a visitor to a glass display case in the back of the La Flor store.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 11, 1994
TIJUANA, Mexico -- The regional chief of the Mexican immigration service in Tijuana and two deputies have been charged with corruption in a growing scandal involving an alleged network of Mexican federal officials allied with immigrant smugglers.The Mexican secretariat of the interior is investigating allegations that the immigration service delegation in Tijuana earned as much as $70,000 a week for providing safe passage through the border region for Chinese, Central American and other non-Mexican immigrants.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 3, 1993
TIJUANA, Mexico -- Mexican police hunting the killers of a Roman Catholic cardinal have discovered a sophisticated cross-border tunnel that drug traffickers were building to smuggle narcotics into the United States, authorities said yesterday.The lighted and concrete-reinforced tunnel is strategically located between Tijuana's international airport and the Otay Mesa border crossing. Police sources estimated it was about 100 feet from completion. It originates beneath a warehouse in a Mexican industrial area housing hundreds of U.S.-owned assembly plants, and extends almost 1,500 feet north under the international border, authorities said.
NEWS
By Sam Enriquez and Richard Marosi and Sam Enriquez and Richard Marosi,Los Angeles Times | November 24, 2006
NUEVO LAREDO, Mexico -- The top police officer in this unhinged border city has 300 openings on a 600-member police force, and his fearful greeting gave a big clue about why. "Please, please don't use my name or take a photograph," the interim chief begged. One police chief was killed last year, a second quit in the spring, and no one else appears brave, or foolhardy, enough to work this side of the law in Nuevo Laredo. Mexican President Vicente Fox quietly withdrew the federal police that he had dispatched here with great fanfare last year, leaving the city virtually unprotected in a smuggling war that has claimed 170 lives since January.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 27, 2006
SAN DIEGO -- A cross-border tunnel nearly half a mile long, from a nondescript industrial building in Tijuana to a warehouse in San Diego, is thought to be the longest illegal tunnel ever discovered along the U.S.-Mexican border, federal authorities said yesterday. Stacked near the tunnel - a deep passage with lighting, ventilation and a pulley system - authorities found more than two tons of marijuana. The tunnel is 2,400 feet long and roomy enough for people to run through. U.S. and Mexican authorities, who have found several border-crossing tunnels in recent years, have made no arrests.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | September 24, 2005
A federal judge sentenced two Los Angeles men this week to decades in prison for importing a huge amount of cocaine and marijuana into the Baltimore region, federal prosecutors announced yesterday. U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles Jr. sentenced Jose Jesus Gutierrez, 31, yesterday to 40 years in prison for conspiracy to import and distribute cocaine and marijuana. On Thursday, the judge had sentenced co-defendant Laurencio Gonzalez, 36, to 45 years on the same charges. According to the U.S. attorney's office, trial testimony showed Gonzalez and Gutierrez distributed over 600 kilograms of cocaine to drug dealers in the Baltimore area in 2002 and 2003.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2005
MEXICO CITY - Once Mexico's deadliest trafficker, the weakened Arellano Felix drug cartel of Tijuana has merged with another gang in a desperate bid for survival, the country's narcotics prosecutor said yesterday. Jose Luis Santiago Vasconcelos, deputy attorney general for organized crime, said recent intelligence showed that the Tijuana cartel merged with the so-called Gulf cartel led by Osiel Cardenas to fend off usurpers. The main threat is from the Sinaloa-based conglomerate headed by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman and Ismael Zambada.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2003
TIJUANA, Mexico - Tucked into a quiet street in the hilly working-class Libertad neighborhood overlooking the crossing to the United States sits a cafe that embodies the changes in this border city. An Internet cafe occupies part of the building. The other half is a dimly lit slice of Vienna or Milan, furnished with a grand piano, a lyre and a Viking helmet. Tijuana, the quintessential border town of liquor stores, auto shops and taco stands, has developed a flourishing opera scene, the product of years of toil by many people for love of the art. This cafe is a visible part.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 13, 2003
TIJUANA, Mexico - It may not look like much to many Americans, but Veronica Maldonato's 900-square-foot, concrete-block condo is heaven when you compare it with where she, her husband and her son had been living for the past year. If you squint across the valley at the hillside in the distance, you can see the place: villages of squatters' shacks called colonnias, their metal roofs shimmering in the relentless sun of Baja California, in the extreme northwest corner of Mexico. No electricity.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2005
MEXICO CITY - Once Mexico's deadliest trafficker, the weakened Arellano Felix drug cartel of Tijuana has merged with another gang in a desperate bid for survival, the country's narcotics prosecutor said yesterday. Jose Luis Santiago Vasconcelos, deputy attorney general for organized crime, said recent intelligence showed that the Tijuana cartel merged with the so-called Gulf cartel led by Osiel Cardenas to fend off usurpers. The main threat is from the Sinaloa-based conglomerate headed by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman and Ismael Zambada.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 1997
MEXICO CITY -- Not long ago, Raul Araiza, a well-known producer of the Mexican soap operas known as "telenovelas," came to officials in Tijuana with a script for a soap opera about the city.Tijuana officials might have been forgiven a giddy moment, pondering how the show might help the city's image. But as they read the script, the moment faded."Tijuana" the telenovela, as it turned out, was going to be a lot like Tijuana the city. The show, which begins filming later this summer, is a love story set against a backdrop of immigrant smuggling, drug trafficking, discrimination against Indians, assembly plants, gun running, violence and xenophobic U.S. politicians wanting to build walls between the two countries.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2003
Henry C. Amos, a colorful raconteur and former restaurateur whose legendary hijinks made him a popular local figure for nearly 40 years, died from complications during heart surgery Tuesday at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Baltimore. He was 76. No one could ever accuse Mr. Amos of having been stuck in a career rut. He served two years in the Army Air Forces, boxed in college for four years, worked as an industrial engineer, was a management trainee, taught physical education, established one of the earliest Mexican restaurants in Maryland, sold antiques, and happily added "beach bum" to his resume after spending six years in California sunning himself.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2003
One day in 1968 when Juan and Abel Velazquez were 15 years old, their father sat them down and placed before them canvases of black velvet. Jose Velazquez had been a boxer in Mexico City. Later, he taught himself cartooning and, from there, to paint on velvet, which is how he was supporting his family. "Time for playing is over," he told them. "It's time to make money." He took up a brush, dabbed it in pink paint and handed down to his sons the one craft he knew. Starting with a simple classic of Tijuana velvet, he taught them to paint the Pink Panther.
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