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By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 23, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A day of fighting between U.S. troops and insurgents in the turbulent city of Ramadi left 25 Iraqis dead and 17 wounded, the military said yesterday. Fighting erupted Wednesday afternoon in the predominantly Sunni Muslim city about 60 miles west of Baghdad after a homemade bomb exploded alongside a Marine convoy. Iraqi guerrillas then attacked with small-arms fire and rocket-propelled grenades, starting a series of clashes that ground on throughout the day. U.S. troops backed by warplanes battled dozens of insurgents.
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NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Christian Berthelsen and Peter Spiegel and Christian Berthelsen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 30, 2007
The top U.S. military commander in Iraq warned Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in May that the country's biggest dam, just up the Tigris River from the northern city of Mosul, is at risk of collapse, putting the city's 1.7 million people in danger of being inundated by a 65-foot flood wave. The letter from Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, co-signed by the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, is included in an audit to be published tomorrow. The report found that little or no progress has been made to shore up the Mosul Dam since the May warning, largely because a $27 million project funded by U.S. reconstruction money has been plagued by mismanagement and possible fraud.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 3, 2003
NUMANIYAH, Iraq - In the shade of a grove of palm trees along the banks of the Tigris River, Lt. Casey Brock stood yesterday over a pile of Iraqi rocket-propelled grenades and pondered their destructive power. "You are looking at 20 dead Marines for each one of these," said Brock of the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, pulling open box after box of the slender cone-shaped rockets capable of piercing through the Marines' armored amphibious assault vehicles. Nearby lay hundreds of abandoned mortars, an anti-aircraft gun, three tanks, stashes of AK-47s and other ammunition stores.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,Los Angeles Times | October 14, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraq's minister of interior, whose forces are accused of complicity in sectarian death squad killings, strenuously defended his agency in an interview with U.S. reporters yesterday and said he had backing of the prime minister and the parliament to remove corrupt and incompetent commanders from the streets. But Jawad Bolani, a political independent who took over as interior minister in June after weeks of infighting over the post, also played down the problems at the ministry, seen by many as a source of sectarian tension and violence throughout the country.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 2, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Fauzi Muhammad gleans the twigs and reeds from his nylon fishing net with fingers as thick as mooring rope. His black hair is flecked with silver, like moonlight on the water at night. His toes are white and puckered, from soaking in water. His eyes are brown, like the muddy eddies of his beloved Tigris River. Every day at 5 a.m. he walks from his ramshackle house near central Baghdad and climbs down a concrete embankment to the water's edge. While crickets sing in the hot dimness, he launches his 15-foot wooden boat.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,Los Angeles Times | October 14, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraq's minister of interior, whose forces are accused of complicity in sectarian death squad killings, strenuously defended his agency in an interview with U.S. reporters yesterday and said he had backing of the prime minister and the parliament to remove corrupt and incompetent commanders from the streets. But Jawad Bolani, a political independent who took over as interior minister in June after weeks of infighting over the post, also played down the problems at the ministry, seen by many as a source of sectarian tension and violence throughout the country.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Christian Berthelsen and Peter Spiegel and Christian Berthelsen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 30, 2007
The top U.S. military commander in Iraq warned Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in May that the country's biggest dam, just up the Tigris River from the northern city of Mosul, is at risk of collapse, putting the city's 1.7 million people in danger of being inundated by a 65-foot flood wave. The letter from Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, co-signed by the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, is included in an audit to be published tomorrow. The report found that little or no progress has been made to shore up the Mosul Dam since the May warning, largely because a $27 million project funded by U.S. reconstruction money has been plagued by mismanagement and possible fraud.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 18, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Five bombings in Kirkuk killed 23 bystanders and wounded 76 others yesterday in what appeared to be coordinated attacks on police as well as Kurdish and Sunni Arab politicians in the oil-rich northern city, bringing the day's toll in Iraq to at least 59 dead. There has been an upsurge in attacks during recent weeks in Kirkuk, where Kurds and Sunnis have struggled for control of the city's oil wealth. Late Friday night, a bomb exploded in the Tiseen neighborhood, injuring three people.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 2, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - For decades, enmity between Iraq's Shiite and Sunni Muslim communities has run deep and deadly. This week, the Shiite-Sunni rift appeared to vanish momentarily, as hundreds of desperate Shiite pilgrims caught in the crush of Wednesday's bridge disaster leapt into the Tigris River. Hundreds of Sunnis flocked to the river's eastern bank, many diving in to rescue Shiite pilgrims drowning in the Tigris' muddy waters. Othman Ali Abdul-Hafal was one of them. The 19-year-old wrestler swam out and rescued five people, pulling them safely back to the embankment.
NEWS
By E.A. Torriero and E.A. Torriero,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 8, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - Six U.S. soldiers were killed as their Black Hawk helicopter crashed near the Tigris River here yesterday morning, apparently downed by ground fire. With two more deaths elsewhere, 32 Americans have been killed in Iraq over the past seven days, making it the deadliest week since the end of major hostilities. Several U.S. Army officers at the scene of the crash and a nearby base said it was likely that the Black Hawk was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade, making it the third U.S. helicopter destroyed by hostile fire in two weeks.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 18, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Five bombings in Kirkuk killed 23 bystanders and wounded 76 others yesterday in what appeared to be coordinated attacks on police as well as Kurdish and Sunni Arab politicians in the oil-rich northern city, bringing the day's toll in Iraq to at least 59 dead. There has been an upsurge in attacks during recent weeks in Kirkuk, where Kurds and Sunnis have struggled for control of the city's oil wealth. Late Friday night, a bomb exploded in the Tiseen neighborhood, injuring three people.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 2, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - For decades, enmity between Iraq's Shiite and Sunni Muslim communities has run deep and deadly. This week, the Shiite-Sunni rift appeared to vanish momentarily, as hundreds of desperate Shiite pilgrims caught in the crush of Wednesday's bridge disaster leapt into the Tigris River. Hundreds of Sunnis flocked to the river's eastern bank, many diving in to rescue Shiite pilgrims drowning in the Tigris' muddy waters. Othman Ali Abdul-Hafal was one of them. The 19-year-old wrestler swam out and rescued five people, pulling them safely back to the embankment.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 23, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A day of fighting between U.S. troops and insurgents in the turbulent city of Ramadi left 25 Iraqis dead and 17 wounded, the military said yesterday. Fighting erupted Wednesday afternoon in the predominantly Sunni Muslim city about 60 miles west of Baghdad after a homemade bomb exploded alongside a Marine convoy. Iraqi guerrillas then attacked with small-arms fire and rocket-propelled grenades, starting a series of clashes that ground on throughout the day. U.S. troops backed by warplanes battled dozens of insurgents.
NEWS
By E.A. Torriero and E.A. Torriero,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 8, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - Six U.S. soldiers were killed as their Black Hawk helicopter crashed near the Tigris River here yesterday morning, apparently downed by ground fire. With two more deaths elsewhere, 32 Americans have been killed in Iraq over the past seven days, making it the deadliest week since the end of major hostilities. Several U.S. Army officers at the scene of the crash and a nearby base said it was likely that the Black Hawk was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade, making it the third U.S. helicopter destroyed by hostile fire in two weeks.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 2, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Fauzi Muhammad gleans the twigs and reeds from his nylon fishing net with fingers as thick as mooring rope. His black hair is flecked with silver, like moonlight on the water at night. His toes are white and puckered, from soaking in water. His eyes are brown, like the muddy eddies of his beloved Tigris River. Every day at 5 a.m. he walks from his ramshackle house near central Baghdad and climbs down a concrete embankment to the water's edge. While crickets sing in the hot dimness, he launches his 15-foot wooden boat.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 23, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The white-haired barber, elegant and still on the job, loses himself in long tales about his stint as hairdresser for Faisal II, Iraq's last king, nearly 60 years ago. Across the street, the owner of a beverage shop points to his father's solemn portrait on the wall. With obvious pride, the owner says his family has been selling grape juice on this spot since 1908. A few doors down, men of all ages sip hot tea from thimble-size glasses and smoke elaborate water pipes at the Cafe of Hassan, reported to be a 200-year-old meeting spot.
NEWS
By Susan Sachs and Susan Sachs,Newsday | January 14, 1993
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Saddam Hussein's farewell message to his nemesis in the White House was chilling, bitter and unrepentant."Damn the American aggressors and their agents!" he said in a live television address four hours after allied warplanes bombed military targets in southern Iraq yesterday. "Let Iraqi skies be filled with fireballs and flames against the aggressors from south to north, from east to west."The criminals," he declared, igniting, in his words, a holy war."Let every plane be a target for you," the Iraqi president told his people.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 23, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The white-haired barber, elegant and still on the job, loses himself in long tales about his stint as hairdresser for Faisal II, Iraq's last king, nearly 60 years ago. Across the street, the owner of a beverage shop points to his father's solemn portrait on the wall. With obvious pride, the owner says his family has been selling grape juice on this spot since 1908. A few doors down, men of all ages sip hot tea from thimble-size glasses and smoke elaborate water pipes at the Cafe of Hassan, reported to be a 200-year-old meeting spot.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 3, 2003
NUMANIYAH, Iraq - In the shade of a grove of palm trees along the banks of the Tigris River, Lt. Casey Brock stood yesterday over a pile of Iraqi rocket-propelled grenades and pondered their destructive power. "You are looking at 20 dead Marines for each one of these," said Brock of the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, pulling open box after box of the slender cone-shaped rockets capable of piercing through the Marines' armored amphibious assault vehicles. Nearby lay hundreds of abandoned mortars, an anti-aircraft gun, three tanks, stashes of AK-47s and other ammunition stores.
NEWS
By Susan Sachs and Susan Sachs,Newsday | January 14, 1993
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Saddam Hussein's farewell message to his nemesis in the White House was chilling, bitter and unrepentant."Damn the American aggressors and their agents!" he said in a live television address four hours after allied warplanes bombed military targets in southern Iraq yesterday. "Let Iraqi skies be filled with fireballs and flames against the aggressors from south to north, from east to west."The criminals," he declared, igniting, in his words, a holy war."Let every plane be a target for you," the Iraqi president told his people.
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