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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1997
"Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all."-- Helen Keller When Mohamed Lehar first heard of Tierra del Fuego as a teen-ager growing up in Johannesburg, South Africa, he was -- at once -- captivated. If he was ever going to run away from the world, he told friends, it would be to the Land of Fire.Last month, Lehar, now a U.S. citizen, the father of two and at 48 a research associate in the Department of Neurology at Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine, didn't exactly run away -- but he did go to Tierra del Fuego on his way to running what was called "The Last Marathon" in Antarctica.
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NEWS
By Charles D. Duncan | August 5, 2008
With the Summer Olympics almost upon us, it seems appropriate to take special note of an ultra-marathon champion that seldom gets the attention it deserves. The event is seemingly impossible: a journey from Tierra del Fuego to the Canadian Arctic and back, 9,300 miles each way, in nonstop stages that last days without food or water. And like some nightmare of Roman gladiators, if you fail, you die. But there's a catch: The participants can fly. These ultra-marathoners are migratory red knots, shorebirds not much more than half the weight of a pigeon.
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NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 5, 2000
USHUAIA, Argentina -- When Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan first caught sight of this frigid island at the tip of South America in 1519, he named it Tierra del Fuego -- Land of Fire -- for the smoky blazes rising from Indian camps on the shore. Little did he know that the Indians had their eye on him as well. Tierra del Fuego's tribes had long used fire as a signal, throwing green beechwood branches onto their campfires as a warning if an intruder was spotted. As Magellan cruised past the island in his tall-masted ship, through the straits that today carry his name, one smoky blaze after another blossomed along the shore.
TRAVEL
By Richard O'Mara and By Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 3, 2002
I always wanted to visit Tierra del Fuego, but never thought I'd make it. Though I worked as a reporter for years in South America, I never found the journalistic justification to go. Maybe that's why I read so many books about it. Things change. Recently my wife, Susana, and I found ourselves speeding toward that remote archipelago at the bottom of the South American continent, our trip actually enabled by the financial mess in Argentina, a consequence of the country's default on its foreign debt.
TRAVEL
By Richard O'Mara and By Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 3, 2002
I always wanted to visit Tierra del Fuego, but never thought I'd make it. Though I worked as a reporter for years in South America, I never found the journalistic justification to go. Maybe that's why I read so many books about it. Things change. Recently my wife, Susana, and I found ourselves speeding toward that remote archipelago at the bottom of the South American continent, our trip actually enabled by the financial mess in Argentina, a consequence of the country's default on its foreign debt.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 8, 1995
TIERRA DEL FUEGO, Chile -- Mary Kalin Arroyo steps off a new dirt road and into a pristine forest. Towering overhead are beech trees older than Shakespeare or Columbus. At her feet is a carpet of up to 75 species of moss and 140 types of lichens.Ms. Kalin, a botanist from New Zealand, is chief of a wary advance guard pledged to help transform this landscape in the name of progress, profit and the inevitable.Her team, including nearly 100 botanists, zoologists, ornithologists, archaeologists and accountants, has been hired by the Trillium Corp.
FEATURES
By F. Lisa Beebe and F. Lisa Beebe,Contributing Writer | August 16, 1992
Was the brochure to be believed?In alluring prose, it stated: "Magellanes, Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego . . . names which for centuries have fascinated the world and conjured up images of untold adventure at the very ends of the earth."Shared by Chile and Argentina, Patagonia (which encompasses Tierra del Fuego) looms at the horizon of most travelers' knowledge and wonder. Precisely because we know so little about it, it is intriguing, like a flirtation ripe with daydreams and promise.Armed with expectations based more on fantasy than fact, I took off for Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, places out of history books and poetry, lands of an imagined aspect sketched from bits and pieces of information gleaned here and there.
NEWS
By J. Duncan Moore Jr | June 23, 1991
ROAD FEVER: A HIGH-SPEED TRAVELOGUE. Tim Cahill. Random House. 278 pages. $17.95. Pick up "The Guinness Book of World Records," 1991 edition, skip the feats of haggis-hurling, domino-stacking, pogo-jumping and baked bean-eating, and turn to the comparatively unremarkable section on driving records. There find the following:Trans-Americas: Garry Sowerby (Canada), with Tim Cahill (US) as co-driver and navigator, drove a 1988 GMC Sierra K3500 four-wheel-drive pickup truck powered by a 6.2 liter V8 Detroit diesel engine from Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina to Prudhoe Bay, AK, a distance of 14,739 miles, in a total elapsed time of 23 days 22 hr. 43 min. from Sep. 29 to Oct. 22, 1987.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | January 4, 1996
A few years ago, I was afraid to drive in the snow, so I went out and bought a four-wheel-drive vehicle. Now the only thing I'm afraid of when it snows are other four-wheel-drive vehicles.This is because owners of four-wheel-drive vehicles seem to suffer some sort of brain malfunction whenever roads conditions are bad.Instead of slowing down and driving like sensible individuals, they drive like idiots through the ice and snow.If they're not barrelling down the highway, they're weaving in and out of traffic, apparently convinced that having four-wheel-drive means they no longer have to worry about skidding into the nearest bridge abutment and ramming their pointy little heads through the windshield.
NEWS
By Charles D. Duncan | August 5, 2008
With the Summer Olympics almost upon us, it seems appropriate to take special note of an ultra-marathon champion that seldom gets the attention it deserves. The event is seemingly impossible: a journey from Tierra del Fuego to the Canadian Arctic and back, 9,300 miles each way, in nonstop stages that last days without food or water. And like some nightmare of Roman gladiators, if you fail, you die. But there's a catch: The participants can fly. These ultra-marathoners are migratory red knots, shorebirds not much more than half the weight of a pigeon.
NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 5, 2000
USHUAIA, Argentina -- When Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan first caught sight of this frigid island at the tip of South America in 1519, he named it Tierra del Fuego -- Land of Fire -- for the smoky blazes rising from Indian camps on the shore. Little did he know that the Indians had their eye on him as well. Tierra del Fuego's tribes had long used fire as a signal, throwing green beechwood branches onto their campfires as a warning if an intruder was spotted. As Magellan cruised past the island in his tall-masted ship, through the straits that today carry his name, one smoky blaze after another blossomed along the shore.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1997
"Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all."-- Helen Keller When Mohamed Lehar first heard of Tierra del Fuego as a teen-ager growing up in Johannesburg, South Africa, he was -- at once -- captivated. If he was ever going to run away from the world, he told friends, it would be to the Land of Fire.Last month, Lehar, now a U.S. citizen, the father of two and at 48 a research associate in the Department of Neurology at Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine, didn't exactly run away -- but he did go to Tierra del Fuego on his way to running what was called "The Last Marathon" in Antarctica.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | January 4, 1996
A few years ago, I was afraid to drive in the snow, so I went out and bought a four-wheel-drive vehicle. Now the only thing I'm afraid of when it snows are other four-wheel-drive vehicles.This is because owners of four-wheel-drive vehicles seem to suffer some sort of brain malfunction whenever roads conditions are bad.Instead of slowing down and driving like sensible individuals, they drive like idiots through the ice and snow.If they're not barrelling down the highway, they're weaving in and out of traffic, apparently convinced that having four-wheel-drive means they no longer have to worry about skidding into the nearest bridge abutment and ramming their pointy little heads through the windshield.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 8, 1995
TIERRA DEL FUEGO, Chile -- Mary Kalin Arroyo steps off a new dirt road and into a pristine forest. Towering overhead are beech trees older than Shakespeare or Columbus. At her feet is a carpet of up to 75 species of moss and 140 types of lichens.Ms. Kalin, a botanist from New Zealand, is chief of a wary advance guard pledged to help transform this landscape in the name of progress, profit and the inevitable.Her team, including nearly 100 botanists, zoologists, ornithologists, archaeologists and accountants, has been hired by the Trillium Corp.
FEATURES
By F. Lisa Beebe and F. Lisa Beebe,Contributing Writer | August 16, 1992
Was the brochure to be believed?In alluring prose, it stated: "Magellanes, Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego . . . names which for centuries have fascinated the world and conjured up images of untold adventure at the very ends of the earth."Shared by Chile and Argentina, Patagonia (which encompasses Tierra del Fuego) looms at the horizon of most travelers' knowledge and wonder. Precisely because we know so little about it, it is intriguing, like a flirtation ripe with daydreams and promise.Armed with expectations based more on fantasy than fact, I took off for Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, places out of history books and poetry, lands of an imagined aspect sketched from bits and pieces of information gleaned here and there.
NEWS
By J. Duncan Moore Jr | June 23, 1991
ROAD FEVER: A HIGH-SPEED TRAVELOGUE. Tim Cahill. Random House. 278 pages. $17.95. Pick up "The Guinness Book of World Records," 1991 edition, skip the feats of haggis-hurling, domino-stacking, pogo-jumping and baked bean-eating, and turn to the comparatively unremarkable section on driving records. There find the following:Trans-Americas: Garry Sowerby (Canada), with Tim Cahill (US) as co-driver and navigator, drove a 1988 GMC Sierra K3500 four-wheel-drive pickup truck powered by a 6.2 liter V8 Detroit diesel engine from Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina to Prudhoe Bay, AK, a distance of 14,739 miles, in a total elapsed time of 23 days 22 hr. 43 min. from Sep. 29 to Oct. 22, 1987.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | November 25, 2007
Can you suggest the best time to take a South American cruise around Cape Horn, including the smoothest month for sailing? The best times to travel are December, January and February, when you'll likely encounter average daytime highs in the 80s in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Santiago, Chile, and lows in the 50s and 60s. But it's only temporary. As your ship makes it way toward the southern tip of South America, be prepared to bundle up. In Ushuaia, the capital of Tierra del Fuego province in Argentina, the daytime temperature ranges from 42 to 57 degrees.
TRAVEL
February 8, 2009
My husband and I live in Columbia, and we traveled on a South American cruise for two weeks in December and fell in love with Ushuaia, Argentina. We felt the mystique of being at the "end of the world" and as far south as you can get before heading to Antarctica. Traveling the Beagle Channel to the Tierra del Fuego National Park provided us with the most amazing landscapes and took us past the "lighthouse at the end of the world." There are few places we have seen that are this beautiful and magical.
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