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By Scott Dance | May 13, 2012
It was plain to see that the mild winter and warm spring had flowers and trees blooming ahead of schedule in March and April. Less easy to see are the ticks and other insects that came with them - unless you're swatting them away. Tick season got an early start this year by as much as three to four weeks, said Michael Raupp, a professor of entomology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Similarly, the mild winter and early spring heat stirred other insects, like mosquitoes, mites and stink bugs, he said.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The state health insurance exchange continued enrolling consumers in Medicaid, adding almost 22,000 new people to the rolls in the last month, according to a report released Friday. The report said 376,850 people in the state have gained coverage under the federal-state program for the low-income since the exchange launched a year ago under the federal Affordable Care Act. Another 2,425 people bought private insurance plans in the last month, though the open enrollment period is closed.
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NEWS
By David Tayman, D.V.M | June 10, 2014
Q: Considering the cold, snowy winter we just had, can pet owners look forward to any relief this year in dealing with fleas, ticks and other parasites? A: Ahh, if only! Cold winters may reduce the parasite population, but these hardy and horrifying pests always make a comeback. So knowing your prevention options is as important as ever. External parasites include fleas, ticks, mosquitoes and sarcoptic mange. Fleas can cause maddening allergic skin reactions and transmit a scary variety of viral and bacterial diseases (as well as some internal parasites)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The infant mortality rate has dropped by 15 percent in Maryland in the past decade, but tick upward slightly in 2013, state officials reported Friday. The rate increased to 6.6 per 1,000 live births last year, up from 6.3 per 1,000 in 2012. No single cause was identified, according to a statement from Gov. Martin O'Malley and the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The main causes include low birth weight, congenital abnormalities, sudden infant death syndrome and maternal complications of pregnancy.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
Hundreds of Baltimore-area families have volunteered for a government study to spray their suburban yards with pesticide, which researchers hope can protect them from Lyme disease but that environmentalists warn is unsafe. The goal, federal and state health officials say, is to find a new way to prevent the widespread illness, which is spread by tick bites and can cause fever, headaches and fatigue — and, if untreated, may even affect joints, nerves and the heart. Half of the 185 families who've signed up this year in Baltimore, Carroll, Harford and Howard counties are having the edges of their yards sprayed with bifenthrin, a chemical pesticide commonly applied around homes to fight ticks, fleas and mosquitoes.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The infant mortality rate has dropped by 15 percent in Maryland in the past decade, but tick upward slightly in 2013, state officials reported Friday. The rate increased to 6.6 per 1,000 live births last year, up from 6.3 per 1,000 in 2012. No single cause was identified, according to a statement from Gov. Martin O'Malley and the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The main causes include low birth weight, congenital abnormalities, sudden infant death syndrome and maternal complications of pregnancy.
NEWS
June 1, 2007
The Howard County Health Department reminds residents that spring and summer months increase the risk of exposure to ticks and the possibility of Lyme disease, which spread through the bite of an infected tick. According to the National Lyme Disease Risk Map developed by the Centers for Disease Control, Howard County and Maryland are in the high-risk areas of the United States. Ticks that carry the disease are commonly found in woods and in areas between lawns and woods. Symptoms may include fever, headaches, fatigue and a rash in the shape of a bulls-eye.
NEWS
By Gary Taylor and Gary Taylor,ORLANDO SENTINEL | December 12, 2004
Long after the debris is gone, some Central Florida residents may still be feeling the effects of the 2004 hurricane season. In fact, for pet owners, the worst may be yet to come. Lurking in the cracks and crevices of homes across the region may be ticks - thousands of them, in various stages of development - perhaps the result of just one tick that hitched a ride inside on the family dog. Central Florida pest-control companies and veterinarians say there has been a notable increase in complaints about tick infestations since the three hurricanes ripped through Central Florida.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 30, 2005
A clock ticks in Baltimore, and I don't mean the one in Oriole Park. It's the homicide clock. It's not something you can look up and see, but something you feel and hear - part of Baltimore's biorhythm - and every year at this time, the ticks get louder, the pulse grows stronger, and anyone who still cares about this stupid waste of life gets a headache. Even if you'd rather not think about it, you can't help but sense the body count building. It's as if you can feel the weight of it. It's not as heavy as it was 10 years ago. But it's still heavy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
As if robocalls didn't have a bad enough reputation in the world of Baltimore media and politics thanks to consultant Julius Henson's activity in the last gubernatorial election, along comes WBFF (Channel 45) Monday night with its own questionable computer-generated calls into hundreds of thousands on Maryland homes. And the calls continued Tuesday. I received one at my home in Baltimore City both days. Raquel Guillory, director of communications for Gov. Martin O'Malley, also received one at home in Howard County Monday night around dinnertime.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Maryland's health exchange reported Friday a decline in the number of people who were covered by private plans through the online insurance portal created by the Affordable Care Act. But the total number of people obtaining coverage through the exchange still grew to 433,947 because of people signing up for Medicaid. About 264 people canceled their private plans in the last month because of special circumstances and a total of 78,666 are now covered through those plans. The state exchange also lost Medicaid recipients who no longer qualified for the program, but gained more than it lost.
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Robin Ann Wolfender was infected with Lyme disease in 1979, when she was a 19-year-old summer camp counselor at Catoctin Mountain Park in Thurmont. Just five years earlier, the tick-borne disease had been named for the Connecticut town where children were developing odd target-shaped rashes and arthritis. Two more years would pass before researchers would link the symptoms to ticks that latched on to human bodies, secreting poisons as they consumed blood. Wolfender, now 54, developed a fever of 105. It took a week for the fever to break, she says, and 11 years for doctors to diagnose her worsening health as Lyme disease.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
My son has had Lyme disease twice - serious infections requiring intravenous antibiotics. How can I keep ticks out of my yard? He plays in our wooded lot every day, and I'm at my wit's end! Ticks like to hang on branch tips and grab a ride when we brush by. Establish wide paths. Remove non-native invasive plants to encourage a functioning native ecosystem, which includes predators for the white-footed mice that are deer ticks' main host. Ticks are native and also have native predators, usually insects, that keep their numbers down.
NEWS
By David Tayman, D.V.M | June 10, 2014
Q: Considering the cold, snowy winter we just had, can pet owners look forward to any relief this year in dealing with fleas, ticks and other parasites? A: Ahh, if only! Cold winters may reduce the parasite population, but these hardy and horrifying pests always make a comeback. So knowing your prevention options is as important as ever. External parasites include fleas, ticks, mosquitoes and sarcoptic mange. Fleas can cause maddening allergic skin reactions and transmit a scary variety of viral and bacterial diseases (as well as some internal parasites)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
The Maryland health exchange reported that more than 343,000 people have gained coverage through the online marketplace as of May 10, including some people who reported having trouble with the website and signed up after the official enrollment period ended. Those enrolling in private plans reached 67,907, up about 150 people in the last month. Open enrollment ended March 31, though people who said they tried and failed to sign up were given more time and those whose work or family status changed can sign up year-round.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
It would be understandable if No. 6 Duke still feels the sting of Saturday's 10-6 loss to No. 1 Maryland and tries to channel that anger into Sunday's game against No. 5 Loyola at 6 p.m. Sunday at Ridley Athletic Complex in Baltimore. But as far as coach Charley Toomey is concerned, the Greyhounds (4-1) are concentrating on the skills, not the emotions, of the Blue Devils (4-1). “I'm expecting a very talented Duke team coming to Ridley,” Toomey said Thursday. “We certainly don't worry about Duke of the past, or else we would've been worried last year about playing a 2-4 Duke team.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | July 2, 1995
I don't know about your neighborhood, but a walk around the countryside in my neck of the woods must be followed this summer with a careful body check for ticks.Dr. Glen Needham of Ohio State University specializes in tick study and recently told me, "Adult ticks may live for several years without eating or drinking water. Their long life is due to a slow metabolism and an ability to suck moisture from air at high humidities."Needham and I recently shared a chumline while fishing with a mutual friend, Ted Burns of Jessup, and he offered us tips on protecting ourselves from ticks and the diseases they may carry.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | July 5, 2007
I live near a national park and walk my dogs in the woods. There are ticks everywhere. I stop and pull ticks off myself every few minutes, but I hate to just throw them back in the bushes where they will wait for me the next time I go for a walk. Is there an easy way to kill or dispose of them? Put on insect-repellent-containing DEET before you leave home. Spray shoes and socks, and tuck your trouser legs into your socks. Carry a roll of Scotch tape in your pocket. Whenever you spot a tick, use the tape to trap it. Once it is sealed in tape, it can't escape.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Maryland's health exchange has enrolled 7,435 people in private insurance plans, as of Dec. 14, jumping more than 2,250 from the previous week, exchange officials reported Friday. Official say repairs to the site, which crashed the day it launched Oct. 1, are helping smooth the process for many users of the online portal. The exchange, however, still remains well below its enrollment goal of 150,000 in private plans by the end of open enrollment March 31. Gov. Martin O'Malley stood by the goal on Friday, though he said he's still not fully satisfied with the website's performance.
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