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NEWS
March 1, 2013
Dan Rodricks says in his column ("A chance to break free of Ticketmaster," Feb. 26) about Ticketmaster fees that "everyone who has used the service to avoid standing in line for concert tickets has a Ticketmaster horror story. " This is absolutely false. I have used Ticketmaster many times and have always been satisfied with the service. Of course I, like anyone else, don't want to spend money unnecessarily, but I don't mind spending it when necessary. I did not resent the cost.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
A federal judge this week allowed a Baltimore man's lawsuit against Ticketmaster's fees to move forward. U.S. District Judge Ellen Hollander dismissed several of Andre Bourgeois' claims – including allegations that the Live Nation company engaged in "negligent misrepresentation" and "fraud" – but said he could proceed with the core of his case. Bourgeois is seeking to win a class-action judgment against the ticket-seller after he said he was overcharged at a 2009 Jackson Browne concert at the Lyric Opera House . Maryland's highest court has ruled that Ticketmaster's fees violate a 1948 Baltimore ordinance designed to curb scalping of Navy football tickets, and which barred companies from charging fees in excess of 50 cents on top of a ticket's stated price.
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NEWS
July 7, 2013
Jeers to the Baltimore City Council members who put big business ahead of the citizens of Baltimore ("Ticketmaster fees could be unlimited with proposed law," July 3). The excuses given for gutting the Ticketmaster fee bill are pathetic. "Baltimore may lose talent. " Maybe we won't! "There is a market for the service fees. " It's a monopoly! It's not as if the citizens can shop around as to whom we want to purchase tickets from. I do go to the box office to save the service charges when it is feasible, but that isn't always the case.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
The Houston Texans returned approximately 200 tickets to Sunday's 1 p.m. game at M&T Bank Stadium, the Ravens announced Friday afternoon. Tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or by visiting www.BaltimoreRavens.com/tickets or www.ticketmaster.com . Sunday's meeting is the teams' first since the Texans' 43-13 win at Reliant Stadium last year. At halftime, Ray Lewis will be inducted into the Ravens Ring of Honor, the eighth player to receive that honor.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
I am appalled at the idea that the City Council has decided to allow Ticketmaster and other companies to charge unlimited "convenience" fees for events in Baltimore ("Ticketmaster fees could be unlimited with proposed law," July 3). I recently attended an event with three others at the Lyric. I purchased tickets from another company because Ticketmaster did not have four seats together. The ones I purchased were at the same price as the ones Ticketmaster was selling. When I got to the checkout, there was an $18 fee added to each ticket plus shipping.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
Here we go again, observing our government changing laws to suit the business owners at the expense of the poor schmucks who are just trying to buy a little entertainment ("City politicians rush to save Ticketmaster's user fees," Feb. 24). Shame on Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, and shame on the Ravens, the Orioles and all the smaller outfits that support Ticketmaster's stupendous rip-off of the American public. How could they stomp on the very folks who support their businesses?
NEWS
February 28, 2013
How fitting to read about the extra fees charged from Ticketmaster just as my newspaper included a "code" to use when ordering tickets for Ringling Brothers Circus ("A chance to break free of Ticketmaster," Feb. 26). The code didn't work on their site so I called Ticketmaster. At first we thought the code wouldn't go into effect until Sunday but an agent double checked and said there was no such code. I then went back on the computer to the Ticketmaster site to see how much tickets would be without The Sun code.
NEWS
March 4, 2013
Don Rodricks column on Ticketmaster ("A chance to break free of Ticketmaster," Feb. 26) is very telling. To understand why Baltimore wants to keep the most-despised Ticketmaster, one should look at the type of politics typically played in Maryland where cronyism and favoritism are common. Why would a computer company get a large order for new phone services without competition? Maybe the company has a deal somewhere. And look at the case last year of the company awarded the contract to build and operate new rest stops on I-95, where a South American company with almost no experience in this type and size of operation was awarded the contract over an experienced U.S. company based on wildly exaggerated sales estimates?
NEWS
February 28, 2013
I was pleased to read your recent article regarding the lawsuit against Ticketmaster ("City politicians rush to save Ticketmaster's user fees," Feb. 24). I now know who to thank: Kudos to Andre Bourgeois for bringing the suit and winning the case. I attend many productions in Baltimore, be they at the Meyerhoff, the Lyric or elsewhere around town. But I will never go to any event unless I can buy a ticket at the box office. Every company is entitled to make a profit for its services, but the exorbitant fees tacked onto tickets by Ticketmaster, which I refuse to pay, are pure gouging.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
The City Council finally had a chance to do something for the average citizen to help them financially, and what do they do? They vote in favor of big business ("Council committee votes to allow Ticketmaster fees," March 1). What a shock! To allow Ticketmaster's unpopular, unnecessary and arbitrary user fees - or should I say "usury fees" - to continue is unbelievable. So the Ravens, the Orioles and some concert and entertainment venues are concerned that Ticketmaster might refuse to handle events in Baltimore.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
One item I haven't seen addressed in regard to Ticketmaster fees is what happened to some Orioles fans last year ("Ticketmaster fees could be unlimited with proposed law," July 3). The Orioles had finally made a play-off run and tickets were available by lottery in advance, on-line only, and limited to four per person. The O's were eliminated in the divisional playoffs and failed to make it back to Baltimore for games to which the team had already sold tickets. The tickets' purchase price was refunded, but the ticket vendor kept its fees!
NEWS
July 8, 2013
I am appalled at the idea that the City Council has decided to allow Ticketmaster and other companies to charge unlimited "convenience" fees for events in Baltimore ("Ticketmaster fees could be unlimited with proposed law," July 3). I recently attended an event with three others at the Lyric. I purchased tickets from another company because Ticketmaster did not have four seats together. The ones I purchased were at the same price as the ones Ticketmaster was selling. When I got to the checkout, there was an $18 fee added to each ticket plus shipping.
NEWS
July 7, 2013
Jeers to the Baltimore City Council members who put big business ahead of the citizens of Baltimore ("Ticketmaster fees could be unlimited with proposed law," July 3). The excuses given for gutting the Ticketmaster fee bill are pathetic. "Baltimore may lose talent. " Maybe we won't! "There is a market for the service fees. " It's a monopoly! It's not as if the citizens can shop around as to whom we want to purchase tickets from. I do go to the box office to save the service charges when it is feasible, but that isn't always the case.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Ticketmaster and other ticket sellers could add unlimited fees to the price of admission for concerts and sporting events under legislation approved by a key City Council committee on Tuesday. The committee gutted a bill that sought to limit "convenience" fees for processing and other services. The fees are sometimes split by the ticket sellers and the venues hosting the events. The decision won praise from ticket sellers and their venue clients — who packed the City Council chambers with lawyers and lobbyists — but criticism from a consumer rights group that advocated for lower fees.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
For the average consumer, ticket service, processing or "convenience" fees may be among the more annoying aspects of going to a big-time sporting event, concert, play or similar attraction. It's one thing to be "nickel and dimed," but service fees may heap as much as 50 percent more on top of the cost of a single ticket. Does providing a ticket, particularly one that can be transferred instantaneously and electronically in this digital age, really cost $10 or more? Absolutely not. That's why a lot of people were probably happy when the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled earlier this year that Baltimore's 1948 anti-scalping law applied to such fees and restricted them to 50 cents per ticket.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
The City Council gave final approval Monday to a bill that would allow companies such as Ticketmaster to continue to charge unlimited fees when selling tickets to events in Baltimore. The 15-member council voted without discussion in favor of the bill, which exempts Ticketmaster and other ticket sellers from Baltimore's long-standing anti-scalping law. Only council members Bill Henry, James B. Kraft and Mary Pat Clarke voted "no. " The law will sunset in September. By then, council members say, they will have had enough time to draft permanent legislation.
NEWS
March 4, 2013
It's safe to say that Ticketmaster doesn't have many fans. The service, which handles ticket sales for venues large and small across the nation, charges fees on its transactions that seem to bear little relationship to either the cost of the tickets or the actual work the company does. We completely sympathize, then, with the Baltimore concert-goer who took the company to court and successfully argued that its fees violate a 1948 Baltimore law limiting extra charges to 50 cents per ticket.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
A federal judge this week allowed a Baltimore man's lawsuit against Ticketmaster's fees to move forward. U.S. District Judge Ellen Hollander dismissed several of Andre Bourgeois' claims – including allegations that the Live Nation company engaged in "negligent misrepresentation" and "fraud" – but said he could proceed with the core of his case. Bourgeois is seeking to win a class-action judgment against the ticket-seller after he said he was overcharged at a 2009 Jackson Browne concert at the Lyric Opera House . Maryland's highest court has ruled that Ticketmaster's fees violate a 1948 Baltimore ordinance designed to curb scalping of Navy football tickets, and which barred companies from charging fees in excess of 50 cents on top of a ticket's stated price.
NEWS
March 11, 2013
Probably nothing else needs to be said about the Ticketmaster issue, especially after the well-written letter from Barbara Blumberg ("Ticketmaster is a scalper by another name," March 6). However, it should be pointed out that Ticketmaster is just one more e-business, like Microsoft, that sells a product that costs almost nothing after its initial development costs are recovered and charges phenomenally high rates. And like Microsoft, it has recovered its development costs long ago and has the capacity to generate incredible profits - well beyond those possible in brick and mortar businesses.
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