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By Matt Slovin and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
The Orioles' first-half success has paid dividends at the Camden Yards box office. Doug Duennes, executive vice president of business operations, told the Baltimore Business Journal that the team experienced a 21 percent increase in ticket sales so far this season. Duennes also mentioned "some uptick" in suite rentals and group sales. A winning product on the field combined with new additions to Camden Yards certainly have contributed to the increased profit. “There's a lot of things that go into it,” Duennes told the Business Journal.
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By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 2, 2014
Maryland announced on Thursday that football season ticket sales have increased 25 percent since last year. That means coach Randy Edsall will receive a $100,000 bonus, according to Edsall's contract. Edsall signed a six-year deal with the Terps in 2011 that is worth $2 million annually. Among the incentives in the contract is a $100,000 bonus if Maryland's season ticket sales increase 25 percent or more in a year. In addition to season ticket sales, the Terps' overall attendance is up 25 percent from last season, the biggest increase of any school within the Power 5 conferences.
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SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 25, 2004
With 36,000 tickets having already been sold for this weekend's NCAA men's lacrosse championships, tournament organizers are preparing to open part of the upper deck of M&T Bank Stadium. "The upper deck will open when every ticket below is sold out," said tournament director Marty Schwartz. "We've set the wheels in motion to open it, but I'd still suggest that people buy tickets now and don't count on the upper deck being open." With the upper deck closed, a sellout is 40,200. Last year's final four drew a record crowd of 37,944 for the semifinals despite dismal weather.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Maryland is hoping to have a successful debut in the Big Ten this year. With it, athletic department officials are hoping to enhance the experience of the fans both at Byrd Stadium and the recently renamed Xfinity Center. The athletic department announced Thursday that the giant videoboards at both venues have been upgraded for this season. There will be a new LED display at Byrd Stadium - including one with closed captioning - and side displays on a new Daktronic videoboard at the Xfinity Center.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown | December 5, 1990
COLLEGE PARK -- Maryland has sold more than 1,000 of the 15,000 tickets it had to purchase for its date with Louisiana Tech in the Independence Bowl Dec. 15."We have to sell about 2,000 to break even and avoid losing money on the venture," said athletic director Andy Geiger. "Sales are going pretty well. There's been a lot of support for us."Maryland will receive $600,000 for playing in the bowl in Shreveport, La., but must give the Atlantic Coast Conference $100,000 off the top. In addition, it had to buy 15,000 tickets at $25 per, a total of $375,000.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Despite lower ticket sales for the NCAA men's lacrosse championships at M&T Bank Stadium than in previous years the event has come to Baltimore, NCAA and Ravens officials said they remain upbeat that the three-day tournament later on Memorial Day weekend will be a success. Advance sales have surpassed 50,000, according to Ravens vice president of ticket sales and operations Baker Koppelman, which puts the event on pace to match the total attendance figure of 79,179 at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia last year.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
They began lining up at 3 a.m. yesterday, and a few hours later, about 100 people were waiting for Maryland Transit Administration officials to start selling MARC train tickets to Washington for the presidential inauguration, authorities said. Ticket sales at the Camden Station were brisk all day, MTA officials said, with a steady flow of patrons paying the special $25 rate to ride the MARC for the Jan. 20 event. "We didn't think people would be out there that early, so we opened up an hour earlier than expected, at 8 a.m.," MTA spokeswoman Jawauna Greene said.
FEATURES
By McClatchy-Tribune | January 8, 2007
At a time when television and radio get raunchier by the minute, the movies and the live world of Broadway seem to have struck gold with good old-fashioned family fare. Broadway set a box-office record Christmas week with $29.1 million in ticket sales, paced by shows like Wicked and Mary Poppins that are tailor-made for a family outing -- though not a cheap one. The biggest movies ditched explicit language, graphic violence and casual sex in favor of the tap-dancing penguin Mumble in Happy Feet and Ben Stiller matching wits with a dinosaur replica that comes to life in Night at the Museum.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1997
Tickets to Orioles games cost more. Nevertheless, the team apparently is selling more of them.According to Joe Foss, the club's chief financial officer, overall ticket sales have jumped more than 10 percent. What the increased sales demonstrate, Foss said, is that "fans respect the position we took on raising prices."The bickering over baseball's new labor agreement and the subsequent delay in finalizing the interleague schedule delayed the sale of Orioles' 1997 tickets by about two months, Foss said.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
Just think where the Orioles would be without Sammy Sosa. In the first four months of direct competition with the Washington Nationals, the Orioles have sold about 1.5 million tickets, and they expect to sell about 100,000 more before Opening Day, according to Matt Dryer, the team's senior director of advertising and promotions. Eleven days before Opening Day 2004, the Orioles had sold about 1.7 million tickets - nearly 12 percent more than this year. The Orioles have done much to counter the competition from the Nationals, who in September were relocated to the nation's capital by Major League Baseball over the bitter objections of owner Peter Angelos.
SPORTS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Ticket sales for Saturday's 139th Preakness are running ahead of last year, as the event's past success and star power of featured musical acts allow organizers to curtail advertising. With the spotlight on the Kentucky Derby winner California Chrome and musical headliner Lorde, Maryland Jockey Club President Tom Chuckas said Monday that most seats outside the Pimlico Race Course infield are sold out, as they were last year at this time. He said sales are running about 2 percent higher than last year, when Orb, a horse with Maryland connections, won the Derby and was headed to the Preakness.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Despite lower ticket sales for the NCAA men's lacrosse championships at M&T Bank Stadium than in previous years the event has come to Baltimore, NCAA and Ravens officials said they remain upbeat that the three-day tournament later on Memorial Day weekend will be a success. Advance sales have surpassed 50,000, according to Ravens vice president of ticket sales and operations Baker Koppelman, which puts the event on pace to match the total attendance figure of 79,179 at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia last year.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore is organizing to bring LGBT baseball fans together at Oriole Park at Camden Yards this summer. "Baltimore is a town that really comes together in the name of its sports teams. Whether you identify within the LGBT spectrum or not, we can all agree that when it comes down to it, we're all rooting for the same team," said Kelly Neel, the GLCCB's deputy executive director, in a statement. "This summer we are hoping to expand on that sense of unity by bringing LGBT Oriole's Outings to Camden Yards.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
If you like Baltimore, beer and beer brewed in Baltimore - and why would you be reading this blog if you didn't? - the above trailer for  Nick Kovacic's new documentary, "Brewmore | Baltimore," should be of interest.  The 65-minute film looks at the history of the beer industry, both nationally and locally, through a Baltimore lens. (One of the movie's main sources is Rob Kasper, the former Sun writer.) Judging from the trailer, it also seems up-to-date with interviews with owners of local breweries, including Stillwater Artisanal Ales, Union Craft Brewing, The Brewer's Art and home-brewers.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
In the command center of the Grand Prix of Baltimore, Tim Mayer, the race's general manager, fielded a few phone calls, answering a couple of questions. But that was it. Preparations for the Grand Prix were running several hours ahead of schedule the day before Friday's qualifying races. In the cavernous room - Mayer asked that its location not be divulged - police and others studied 15 big-screen televisions showing camera feeds and maps. "It's not like it was last year," he said.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
The Grand Prix of Baltimore will be run without a title sponsor for the third year in a row, leaving organizer Race On LLC without a seven-figure payout it had hoped would help cover operating costs. "It's really not that much of a surprise to me," said Debbie Bell, the former Orioles employee hired by Race On as vice president for sales and marketing, on Wednesday. "I think people thought we had a wider window to work with than we really did. It's still a process, and we're getting closer and I'm confident that we are headed the right way. " The Labor Day weekend event did sign sponsorship deals with local companies Esskay, which makes meat products, and Maryland Live Casino, as well as several new national and regional brands.
NEWS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
Not so long ago when someone had tickets to a hot event - say, a big football game - and tried selling them for more than the face value, it was called scalping. And depending on where it was done, the scalper might get arrested or at least forfeit the tickets. Today, however, the same practice, depending on how it's done and who's doing it, goes by a far more flattering description. Now it's called the "secondary ticket market," and the home team - rather than frowning upon such business - is likely getting a slice of the action.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2003
Lured by the paper-thin chance of striking it rich, Marylanders descended on convenience stores and gas stations across the region yesterday and snatched up tickets in the countdown to the highest Mega Millions lottery jackpot in nearly a year. From Towson to Annapolis, they scrambled to buy tickets as the clock ticked down to last night's $140 million prize, the highest it has reached since July, said Buddy Roogow, Maryland State Lottery director. A winner hasn't been drawn since April 29 for the Mega Millions jackpot, which is played in 10 states, including Virginia and Maryland, Roogow said.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
For the average consumer, ticket service, processing or "convenience" fees may be among the more annoying aspects of going to a big-time sporting event, concert, play or similar attraction. It's one thing to be "nickel and dimed," but service fees may heap as much as 50 percent more on top of the cost of a single ticket. Does providing a ticket, particularly one that can be transferred instantaneously and electronically in this digital age, really cost $10 or more? Absolutely not. That's why a lot of people were probably happy when the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled earlier this year that Baltimore's 1948 anti-scalping law applied to such fees and restricted them to 50 cents per ticket.
NEWS
By Andy Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
The world is waiting Sunday to find out who bought the Powerball jackpot winning ticket at a Publix supermarket in Zephyrhills, Fla. Nobody had come forward by mid-morning.  It could take a few days before anybody claims the prize, but it's best to be skeptical of anything that comes out before lottery officials make a formal announcement. Remember the circus surrounding the Mega Millions jackpot winner sold in Maryland last year? It started in the middle of the night, just after it became clear that a hot ticket had been sold in Baltimore County.
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