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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 24, 1992
Marking Ticker's 15th birthday today -- we began, actually, on Monday, Feb. 22, 1977, with the Dow Jones average at 939.26 -- we list some of the hopefully helpful suggestions and tidbits that appeared in these 1,500 columns (1,500,000 words) of the past 15 years:"85% of the time, it pays to be an optimist." (Sam Hopkins, Alex. Brown).Sales hint -- "The bee that sticks close to the hive gathers no honey." (Chinese proverb).Salesmen and women: Each night, ask yourself, "How many hours today did I actually spend selling?"
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Supplemental Security Income payments to adults and children with disabilities were temporarily unavailable during an intermittent outage in the early-morning hours Monday, the U.S. Treasury Department's Bureau of Fiscal Service said Monday. SSI funds are typically released to beneficiaries on Direct Express debit cards at 1 a.m. on the first day of the month, said spokesman David Starck. But an off-and-on outage in the system between 1 a.m. and 2:30 a.m. meant that some beneficiaries using their debit cards then could not access their funds if the system was out at that time, he said.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 17, 1991
NEW YORK -- For most of its 95 years, the Dow Jones News Service machine -- best known as "the ticker" -- was a key part of newsrooms and trading floors, delivering its daily stream of financial information with a loud, rhythmic clack-clack-clack of keys striking paper.The sound of the ticker has long since evolved into the blurred clatter of the high-speed printer, but even that soft drone will be silenced after Jan. 1 when Dow Jones replaces the few remaining ticker machines and completes the conversion to all-electronic delivery of the news service.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 4, 2006
The tension was almost unbearable. Emotionally, you go from the lowest lows to the highest highs and back again, howling and cursing at a glowing 19-inch monitor, palms sweating, wondering why you put yourself through all this. That's right, I just made my first buy on eBay. How do I feel? I'll tell you how I feel. I feel like I need a drink. And it's only 10 in the morning. The item purchased, by the way, was a gently used 460-cc Nike driver. I was looking for a new driver because, like many other golfers, I am delusional.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | January 14, 1998
If you would like to have dinner as guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ticker at your favorite restaurant, try to win our 1998 Dow Jones forecasting contest.If you finish second, you will be our lunch guests. The 10 next-closest crystal ball gazers will receive books about money and investments.To enter, send a postcard -- no letters will be accepted -- with your prediction for the 1998 year-end close of the Dow Jones industrial average. Send only one card per person.Ties will be decided by the flip of a coin.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 23, 1993
Ticker marked its 16th birthday yesterday with the Dow Jones industrial average gaining 20.81 points to close at 3,342.99. When this column was born on Feb. 22, 1977, the Dow index stood at 939.26, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. sold around $8 a share, Delmarva Power & Light was $7, McCormick closed at about $2 (!) and Coca-Cola was $3, all adjusted for splits.BIRTHDAY NOTES: When Ticker ticked its first tick 16 years ago this week, President Jimmy Carter had just taken the oath of office.
BUSINESS
By John M. Moran and John M. Moran,HARTFORD COURANT | January 18, 2004
Remember those old news tickers that continually spewed headlines onto a long strip of paper tape? Well, save a tree and get the electronic version instead. The financial Web site of CBS MarketWatch has a real-time news ticker that's updated with breaking business headlines and news bulletins around-the-clock. The service, called NewsFinder, is online at marketwatch.com/news/newsfinder. Before the opening bell on Wall Street and throughout the business day, commerce-oriented headlines arrive minute-by-minute.
BUSINESS
By Staff Report | March 8, 1994
On Feb. 21, 1977, Julius Westheimer wrote his first column for The Evening Sun. Since then nothing -- not a stock market crash, vacations, bad weather, even illnesses in the family -- has stopped him from filing "The Ticker" twice weekly.Until this week, that is, when an illness ends his streak. He will return to his column-writing duties as soon as he is able.Mr. Westheimer, 77, grew up talking about stocks with his father, Milton F. Westheimer, over the dinner table. After a brief tenure in retailing, he worked for the Baltimore stock brokerage Baker Watts and Co. in 1961.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 18, 2000
ON TUESDAY, Ticker will mark its 23rd birthday. When this column began on Feb. 22, 1977, the Dow Jones average stood at 939.26, the NASDAQ index at 94.14. This morning the Dow stands at 10,514.57 and NASDAQ at 4,548.75 Adjusted for splits, here are Feb. 22, 1977, prices of some well-known stocks: Coca-Cola Co., $2.125; McDonald's Corp., $2.50; Merck & Co. Inc., $1.50; Procter & Gamble Co., $5.25; Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., $4.375. Explosive growth of retirement plans such as 401(k)s, 403(b)
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1998
When Baltimore attorney Peter G. Angelos was growing up, he was intrigued by the news ticker on the side of the old Sun newspaper building that once stood at Baltimore and Charles streets.So when Angelos began negotiating with representatives of the Johns Hopkins University to lease the former Hamburger's clothing store that he owns downtown, he proposed that it include a ticker similar to the one he remembered from childhood to enliven the streetscape.That's how the design for the renovation of the Hamburger's building at Charles and Fayette streets came to include a 24-hour message system on the outside.
BUSINESS
By John M. Moran and John M. Moran,HARTFORD COURANT | January 18, 2004
Remember those old news tickers that continually spewed headlines onto a long strip of paper tape? Well, save a tree and get the electronic version instead. The financial Web site of CBS MarketWatch has a real-time news ticker that's updated with breaking business headlines and news bulletins around-the-clock. The service, called NewsFinder, is online at marketwatch.com/news/newsfinder. Before the opening bell on Wall Street and throughout the business day, commerce-oriented headlines arrive minute-by-minute.
SPORTS
January 9, 2004
By the numbers 17-0 Wisconsin's record in Big Ten games at home under coach Bo Ryan. He said it "My best friend saw the score on the ESPN ticker and said, `I thought they messed it up.' I said, `Thanks for believing in us.' " Adam Mark, Belmont University forward, on the small Tennessee school's recent upset of Missouri. Wisconsin's record in Big Ten games at home
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 9, 2002
Blood Work pits Clint Eastwood as a retired FBI profiler with a rare blood type - and a recent heart transplant - against the man who shot his female heart donor. The title is an apt pun for the hero's medical and detective operations. If you put the word Tired first, it would perfectly describe the movie. As written by Brian Helgeland (from a novel by Michael Connelly) and directed by Eastwood, this low-key L.A. thriller mixes the forensic detective work done with more sophistication on half a dozen current TV shows with an ultimate solution culled from the bottom half of a B-film double-bill.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | December 28, 2001
SADLY, it's time to say goodbye. This is my last column. When Ticker was born almost 25 years ago - Feb. 22, 1977, to be exact - the Dow Jones industrial average stood at 939.26. This morning it is at 10,131.31, a gain of nearly 979 percent. Today, 2,300 columns and about 2 million words later, thanks to our many readers for loyalty. I appreciate your kindly letters, cards, calls, for over a quarter of a century. Since Ticker first ticked, we've seen many changes. Most important: better-informed investors, thanks to an outpouring of financial books, magazines, newsletters, seminars, evening courses, TV shows, computerized research and professionally trained brokers.
TOPIC
By Peter Beinart and Peter Beinart,THE NEW REPUBLIC | December 2, 2001
The general consensus is that, culturally, Sept. 11 has improved America. People are kinder, more patriotic, more united. Journalists are learning foreign languages; students are mulling careers in the CIA; Oprah recently did a show on the principles of Islam. The cultural climate is improving, with one exception: the "crawl." The crawl is television-speak for the bottom-of-the-screen news ticker that showed up on CNN, Fox News and MSNBC on Sept. 11 and has remained there ever since. Media critics, old fogies and self-conceived highbrows have been tut-tutting about it for months now, and they are absolutely right.
SPORTS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
Ravens tight end Shannon Sharpe may be Mr. Wall Street in his Charles Schwab TV commercial spots, but his stock among online fans seems to be slipping. A share of Sharpe (ticker symbol: shar) sold for $47.70 yesterday at Wall Street Sports (www.wallstreetsports.com), a cyberspace stock market where fans can buy and sell imaginary shares of their favorite teams and athletes. By comparison, Giants cornerback Jason Sehorn (ticker: sehj), who gets schooled by Sharpe in the Schwab ad and who squares off against the Ravens in Tampa, Fla., on Sunday, closed at $51.80.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1995
GreenStone Industries Inc.Bethesda ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Ticker ... ... ... Yesterday's... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. .. .. Symbol ... ... ... Cls. ... ... Chg.... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. .. .. STON ... .. .. ... 3 5/8 .. .. ... -Period ended3/31 ... ... ... ... ... 1st qtr. ... ... ... ... Year ago ... ... Chg.Revenue .. .. .. ... ... $8,869 ... ... .. .. ... $3,878 .. .. ... +128.7%Net Income .. .. ... ... $27 ... ... ... .. .. .. $202* ... .. ... -86.6%Primary EPS ... .. .. .. $0.01 ... ... ... ... .. $0.06* .. ... .. -83.3%* Pro forma.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1995
Chesapeake Biological Laboratories Inc.Baltimore.. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. ..Ticker .. .. .. .. ..Yesterday's.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ...Symbol.. .. ..Cls... .. .. .Chg... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..CBL .. .. ..$2.. .. .. ..Unch.Period endedJune 30, 1995 .. .. .. .. .. .1st qtr. .. .Year ago .. ..Chg.Revenue .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..$1,861 .. .. .$1,690 .. ..+10%Net Income .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..$84 .. .. .. ..$9 .. .+830%Primary EPS .. .. .. .. .. .. ..$0.02 .. .. .$0.002 .. .+900%Figures in thousands (except per share data)
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 18, 2000
ON TUESDAY, Ticker will mark its 23rd birthday. When this column began on Feb. 22, 1977, the Dow Jones average stood at 939.26, the NASDAQ index at 94.14. This morning the Dow stands at 10,514.57 and NASDAQ at 4,548.75 Adjusted for splits, here are Feb. 22, 1977, prices of some well-known stocks: Coca-Cola Co., $2.125; McDonald's Corp., $2.50; Merck & Co. Inc., $1.50; Procter & Gamble Co., $5.25; Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., $4.375. Explosive growth of retirement plans such as 401(k)s, 403(b)
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | January 28, 2000
TODAY we open our annual Dow Jones forecasting contest. If you guess closest for the year-end figure, you will have dinner as guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ticker at your favorite area restaurant. If you finish second, you will be our luncheon guests. The 10 next closest will receive books about money and investing. To enter, send a postcard -- letters not accepted -- with your prediction for the year-end close of the Dow Jones industrial average. Only one card per person. Ties will be decided by flip of a coin.
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