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NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
Gypsy moths have no appetite for county trees this year, which means the state will not spray to eradicate the pests in Carroll for the first time in 10 years.The lull doesn't mean the moths won't be back, however, said Robert H. Tichenor Jr., chief of the Forest Pest Management Section of the Department of Agriculture.Gypsy moth populations wax and wane in different areas for a number of reasons, some of which are hard to predict, he said.Weather makes a difference, and so does the population of white-footed deer mice, which eat the moths, he said.
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NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | June 24, 2007
Once again, Maryland trees are under attack by creepy crawlers. Unlike the voracious emerald ash borer that is blamed for the destruction of 25,000 ash trees in Prince George's County this year, the new invader has an appetite for an array of trees -- oak, apple, American beech, birch, sweet gum, willow and hawthorn. This time it is the gypsy moth doing the damage, unleashing the worst infestation in Maryland in 12 years, state agriculture officials say. The damage spans 12 counties, all of the counties of the Baltimore metropolitan area and running from Cecil to Garrett.
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NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | March 31, 1991
Fewer gypsy moths are expected to chew on fewer Carroll tree leaves this year than last, a state pest expert said.The state will spray about 1,400 fewer acres to suppress the insect in the county than it did last year, said Robert H. Tichenor Jr., chief of the Forest Pest Management Section of the Department of Agriculture.Surveys done last fall found fewer egg masses were laid in the county than last year, meaning the potential for damage is less this year, he said.The acreage sprayed will be in the southeast corner of the county, and about half the area will be in Patapsco State Park,said Betsie M. Handley, regional entomologist for the state in MountAiry.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | May 18, 2007
For Steve Watkins, the questions about cankerworms have become a rite of spring. How should he go about eradicating the pests infesting his tree nursery in Pasadena? How much time and effort should go into it? And, what should he tell his customers, who visit Himmel's Farm & Garden Center looking for solutions to the problem? "There's only so much you can do with a 12-ounce bottle of insecticide," said Watkins, who has watched the insects at his two-acre nursery eat the leaves on everything from dogwood to hickory trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SARAH MARSTON and SARAH MARSTON,SUN REPORTER | June 29, 2006
The Reduced Shakespeare Company is always happy to appear at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater. The theater's intimacy "helps with the kind of thing we do: cutting out the important characters and getting right to the sex and killing," said cast member Austin Tichenor. The kings of condensation are back for their fifth run at the Kennedy Center with All the Great Books (abridged) and The Complete History of America (abridged), each of which squeezes years of scholarly studies into about 90 minutes of wacky, fast-paced comedy.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
It's wartime again in Maryland's ongoing battle against the leaf-eating gypsy moth caterpillar. But most of the battle lines this year have moved beyond Baltimore.Area residents are no longer finding the hoards of caterpillars that plagued them between 1988 and 1990, damaging or killing trees and showering droppings on cars and lawn furniture. The hairy little creatures, recognizable by their blue and red spots, have been decimated locally by disease, predators, parasites and, to a lesser degree, insecticides.
NEWS
By DORCAS TAYLOR and DORCAS TAYLOR,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 2005
A sudden resurgence of gypsy moth egg clusters in Garrett County, combined with this year's drought, could mean trouble for the state's forests next spring. Bob Tichenor, the chief of forest pest management at the Maryland Department of Agriculture, said forest entomologists tell him the tan groupings are "some of the largest egg masses we've ever seen." Some areas of Garrett County are seeing more than 500 clusters per acre, with the masses measuring up to 1.5 inches and holding 1,200 eggs, Tichenor said.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1995
The weather warms. The eggs hatch. The creatures stir.They crawl up the trunks of oak trees to dine, and millions of dollars worth of Maryland hardwood starts to die.Bob Tichenor has the job of controlling the voracious leaf-eaters, which fatally weaken trees by defoliating them.It's man against gypsy moth.The annual struggle is set to begin. Thousands of state residents already have received letters alerting them to the coming bombing runs on bugs, by helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft flying 50 feet above the treetops.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | March 25, 1991
It's spring, and that means the gypsy moths are coming.But state entomologists say the leaf-munching bugs are in a sort of reproductive lull in densely settled parts of Maryland, so aerial spraying this spring will be reduced."
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2000
The state Department of Agriculture is surveying county neighborhoods for gypsy moth eggs and has identified Severna Park as a hot spot. During the next few months, the state will determine which areas will be sprayed with insecticides to combat the moths, and some Severna Park residents are bracing for what might happen to their oak trees. The amount of egg masses being found in Severna Park shows that the moths could spread over a larger area than they have in previous years, said Robert Tichenor Jr., chief of forest pest management for the Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | April 8, 2007
The state will start spraying pesticides on more than 3,800 acres in Anne Arundel County to prevent an expected resurgence of gypsy moths. The Maryland Department of Agriculture announced the plan after entomologists tracking the unwelcome insect's egg population noted a potential boom in the number of caterpillars concentrated in 15 areas, said Robert H. Tichenor Jr., the department's chief of forest pest management. "The egg mass counts that we're getting indicate the trees would be defoliated this year, and you can't put the leaves back on the trees once that happens," Tichenor said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SARAH MARSTON and SARAH MARSTON,SUN REPORTER | June 29, 2006
The Reduced Shakespeare Company is always happy to appear at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater. The theater's intimacy "helps with the kind of thing we do: cutting out the important characters and getting right to the sex and killing," said cast member Austin Tichenor. The kings of condensation are back for their fifth run at the Kennedy Center with All the Great Books (abridged) and The Complete History of America (abridged), each of which squeezes years of scholarly studies into about 90 minutes of wacky, fast-paced comedy.
NEWS
By DORCAS TAYLOR and DORCAS TAYLOR,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 2005
A sudden resurgence of gypsy moth egg clusters in Garrett County, combined with this year's drought, could mean trouble for the state's forests next spring. Bob Tichenor, the chief of forest pest management at the Maryland Department of Agriculture, said forest entomologists tell him the tan groupings are "some of the largest egg masses we've ever seen." Some areas of Garrett County are seeing more than 500 clusters per acre, with the masses measuring up to 1.5 inches and holding 1,200 eggs, Tichenor said.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2000
The state Department of Agriculture is surveying county neighborhoods for gypsy moth eggs and has identified Severna Park as a hot spot. During the next few months, the state will determine which areas will be sprayed with insecticides to combat the moths, and some Severna Park residents are bracing for what might happen to their oak trees. The amount of egg masses being found in Severna Park shows that the moths could spread over a larger area than they have in previous years, said Robert Tichenor Jr., chief of forest pest management for the Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1995
The weather warms. The eggs hatch. The creatures stir.They crawl up the trunks of oak trees to dine, and millions of dollars worth of Maryland hardwood starts to die.Bob Tichenor has the job of controlling the voracious leaf-eaters, which fatally weaken trees by defoliating them.It's man against gypsy moth.The annual struggle is set to begin. Thousands of state residents already have received letters alerting them to the coming bombing runs on bugs, by helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft flying 50 feet above the treetops.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
It's wartime again in Maryland's ongoing battle against the leaf-eating gypsy moth caterpillar. But most of the battle lines this year have moved beyond Baltimore.Area residents are no longer finding the hoards of caterpillars that plagued them between 1988 and 1990, damaging or killing trees and showering droppings on cars and lawn furniture. The hairy little creatures, recognizable by their blue and red spots, have been decimated locally by disease, predators, parasites and, to a lesser degree, insecticides.
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