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By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 24, 1996
KARAKORUM, Mongolia -- On a summer day, the silence at the Erdene Zuu Monastery can be unnerving. Inside the main hall, a dozen lonely monks are singing the tantric chants of Tibetan Buddhism; the grounds have the wasted and beaten look of chronic neglect.Yet here and throughout Mongolia, the beginnings of a great religious revival are slowly becoming apparent, one with profound implications for neighboring China and its troubled province, Tibet.Mongolia is more than another former Communist state recapturing its traditions.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
The five gilded figures of Buddha sat cross-legged under sheets of plastic, lips curved in half-smiles of silent joy. The room around them, however, was anything but silent. A nail gun rattled, a hydraulic lift groaned and a half-dozen Buddhist nuns and monks bustled through in paint-splattered jeans. The Temple for World Peace, Baltimore's first Buddhist temple, opened with a Friday evening blessing ceremony after more than a year of construction and a week of flurried - and damp - preparations.
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NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Staff Writer | August 29, 1993
XIGAZE, China -- Preserved in saffron, coated with gold leaf and still wearing his gold watch, the body of the 10th Panchen Lama sits in the lotus position in a glass case inside the Tashilhunpo Monastery.By the dim light of yak butter lamps, squads of monks chant sutras -- as they have around the clock for more than four years since the death of Tibetan Buddhism's second-highest leader.After this month, this remarkable scene will disappear: His body will be sealed inside an ornate stupa, or soul tower, on which the Chinese government has spent more than $10 million.
NEWS
March 13, 2000
Dorothy Kohlars, 104, a World War I nurse who became the first woman to win France's National Order of the Legion of Honor, died March 6 in Barstow, Calif. Cardinal Ignatius Kung, 98, who spent 30 years in prison for defying attempts by China's Communist government to control Catholics through a state-run church, died Sunday of stomach cancer at the Stamford, Conn., home of his nephew. Geoffrey H. Moore, 86, an analyst of business cycles, died Thursday. He rose to prominence during a 30-year career at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a quasi-official private body in Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
March 13, 2000
Dorothy Kohlars, 104, a World War I nurse who became the first woman to win France's National Order of the Legion of Honor, died March 6 in Barstow, Calif. Cardinal Ignatius Kung, 98, who spent 30 years in prison for defying attempts by China's Communist government to control Catholics through a state-run church, died Sunday of stomach cancer at the Stamford, Conn., home of his nephew. Geoffrey H. Moore, 86, an analyst of business cycles, died Thursday. He rose to prominence during a 30-year career at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a quasi-official private body in Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | June 2, 1994
FREDERICK -- Here, atop a mountain overlooking Frederick, the holy leader of a line of Tibetan Buddhism has come to inspire his tiny, growing American flock."
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 1999
XIGAZE, Tibet -- Both boys are too young to shave or even to count their age beyond the fingers of two hands. Both live in the Chinese capital surrounded by police who supervise their every move. But only one is His Holiness the 11th Panchen Lama, the second most revered figure in Tibetan Buddhism, who by tradition reigns in this gritty but sacred city in the highlands of south-central Tibet. The officially approved 11th Panchen Lama is 9-year-old Erdeni Chosgyi Gyalpo, a descendant of nomadic Tibetan herders who has spent the past four years in Beijing studying classic Buddhist texts and scriptures.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | May 23, 1995
BEIJING -- China's Communist leaders, who are officially atheist, have assigned themselves an unlikely task: choosing a living Buddha.In a series of startling statements over the past few days, the government has claimed the right to choose the new Panchen Lama, the second-highest official in Tibetan Buddhism. And although the Communist Party came to power bent on rejecting China's imperial past, it has been relying on dynastic traditions as the basis for choosing the new lama.As obscure as these matters seem, they represent a serious clash between China and the Dalai Lama, Tibet's exiled spiritual leader.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
CHENGDU, China -- Sichuan province's capital serves as China's gateway to Tibet for tourists and traders. Given that China rarely allows foreign correspondents to enter Tibet, Chengdu also plays a big role in the Tibetan rumor mill. And the rumor here these days is that HE has been found.HE is a small boy who would become the 11th Panchen Lama, the second-highest spiritual figure in Tibetan Buddhism next to the exiled Dalai Lama.The 10th Panchen Lama -- Bainqen Erdini Qoigyi Gyaincain -- died Jan. 28, 1989, at age 51, while visiting the Tashilhunpo Monastery in Xigaze, Tibet, the traditional seat of Panchen Lamas.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville | October 20, 1995
"The 124,000 Maryland children living in poverty" are the focus of prayers, sermons and discussions in churches, mosques and synagogues across the state today through Sunday, the "Children's Sabbath" weekend proclaimed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.Participating congregations in Maryland will join an estimated 60,000 congregations of many faiths in other parts of the country whose worship services, religious education classes and community outreach projects are aimed at "improving the lives of America's poor children," a spokesman for the Children's Defense Fund in Washington said.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 1999
XIGAZE, Tibet -- Both boys are too young to shave or even to count their age beyond the fingers of two hands. Both live in the Chinese capital surrounded by police who supervise their every move. But only one is His Holiness the 11th Panchen Lama, the second most revered figure in Tibetan Buddhism, who by tradition reigns in this gritty but sacred city in the highlands of south-central Tibet. The officially approved 11th Panchen Lama is 9-year-old Erdeni Chosgyi Gyalpo, a descendant of nomadic Tibetan herders who has spent the past four years in Beijing studying classic Buddhist texts and scriptures.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 24, 1996
KARAKORUM, Mongolia -- On a summer day, the silence at the Erdene Zuu Monastery can be unnerving. Inside the main hall, a dozen lonely monks are singing the tantric chants of Tibetan Buddhism; the grounds have the wasted and beaten look of chronic neglect.Yet here and throughout Mongolia, the beginnings of a great religious revival are slowly becoming apparent, one with profound implications for neighboring China and its troubled province, Tibet.Mongolia is more than another former Communist state recapturing its traditions.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville | October 20, 1995
"The 124,000 Maryland children living in poverty" are the focus of prayers, sermons and discussions in churches, mosques and synagogues across the state today through Sunday, the "Children's Sabbath" weekend proclaimed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.Participating congregations in Maryland will join an estimated 60,000 congregations of many faiths in other parts of the country whose worship services, religious education classes and community outreach projects are aimed at "improving the lives of America's poor children," a spokesman for the Children's Defense Fund in Washington said.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | May 23, 1995
BEIJING -- China's Communist leaders, who are officially atheist, have assigned themselves an unlikely task: choosing a living Buddha.In a series of startling statements over the past few days, the government has claimed the right to choose the new Panchen Lama, the second-highest official in Tibetan Buddhism. And although the Communist Party came to power bent on rejecting China's imperial past, it has been relying on dynastic traditions as the basis for choosing the new lama.As obscure as these matters seem, they represent a serious clash between China and the Dalai Lama, Tibet's exiled spiritual leader.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | June 2, 1994
FREDERICK -- Here, atop a mountain overlooking Frederick, the holy leader of a line of Tibetan Buddhism has come to inspire his tiny, growing American flock."
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Staff Writer | August 29, 1993
XIGAZE, China -- Preserved in saffron, coated with gold leaf and still wearing his gold watch, the body of the 10th Panchen Lama sits in the lotus position in a glass case inside the Tashilhunpo Monastery.By the dim light of yak butter lamps, squads of monks chant sutras -- as they have around the clock for more than four years since the death of Tibetan Buddhism's second-highest leader.After this month, this remarkable scene will disappear: His body will be sealed inside an ornate stupa, or soul tower, on which the Chinese government has spent more than $10 million.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | April 29, 1993
MOSCOW -- Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, 31-year-old millionaire president of tiny Kalmykia, has fully embraced capitalism."Kalmykia," he says of the autonomous Russian republic, "will not be a republic but a corporation."Two years ago, Mr. Ilyumzhinov was just another young, up-and-coming Communist with an elite education. Then he started working for a Japanese company and began earning dollars.His conversion was swift and complete. "Let's do business," he remembers resolving, "and talk about ideology later."
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
The five gilded figures of Buddha sat cross-legged under sheets of plastic, lips curved in half-smiles of silent joy. The room around them, however, was anything but silent. A nail gun rattled, a hydraulic lift groaned and a half-dozen Buddhist nuns and monks bustled through in paint-splattered jeans. The Temple for World Peace, Baltimore's first Buddhist temple, opened with a Friday evening blessing ceremony after more than a year of construction and a week of flurried - and damp - preparations.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | April 29, 1993
MOSCOW -- Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, 31-year-old millionaire president of tiny Kalmykia, has fully embraced capitalism."Kalmykia," he says of the autonomous Russian republic, "will not be a republic but a corporation."Two years ago, Mr. Ilyumzhinov was just another young, up-and-coming Communist with an elite education. Then he started working for a Japanese company and began earning dollars.His conversion was swift and complete. "Let's do business," he remembers resolving, "and talk about ideology later."
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
CHENGDU, China -- Sichuan province's capital serves as China's gateway to Tibet for tourists and traders. Given that China rarely allows foreign correspondents to enter Tibet, Chengdu also plays a big role in the Tibetan rumor mill. And the rumor here these days is that HE has been found.HE is a small boy who would become the 11th Panchen Lama, the second-highest spiritual figure in Tibetan Buddhism next to the exiled Dalai Lama.The 10th Panchen Lama -- Bainqen Erdini Qoigyi Gyaincain -- died Jan. 28, 1989, at age 51, while visiting the Tashilhunpo Monastery in Xigaze, Tibet, the traditional seat of Panchen Lamas.
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