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By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
BEIJING -- With the 40th anniversary of China's annexation of Tibet only six weeks away, Chinese plans to celebrate the date already are encountering some apparent opposition, according to recent reports from Tibet.In the last few days, there have been reports of a demonstration by pro-independence Tibetans in eastern Tibet and of the ransacking of an army-run arsenal in Lhasa, Tibet's capital.The one-day demonstration by more than 100 Tibetan monks, herdsmen and workers in Gongju County near Tibet's border with Sichuan Province was broken up by several hundred army troops, according to Chinese officials quoted by a Western news agency.
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NEWS
By Ching-Ching Ni and Ching-Ching Ni,Los Angeles Times | June 22, 2008
BEIJING - China paraded the Olympic torch through the Tibetan capital yesterday in defiance of critics who called it a provocative move that could undermine the fragile peace in the Himalayan region three months after the government suppressed violent anti-China protests there. Lhasa remained under virtual lockdown as security forces guarded the carefully selected crowds that cheered the scaled-down two-hour-plus relay from Luobulinka, a traditional Tibetan square, to the mighty Potala Palace, the exiled spiritual leader Dalai Lama's former seat of power.
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NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
BEIJING -- With the 40th anniversary of China's annexation of Tibet only six weeks away, Chinese plans to celebrate the date already are encountering some apparent opposition, according to recent reports from Tibet.In the last few days, there have been reports of a demonstration by pro-independence Tibetans in eastern Tibet and of the ransacking of an army-run arsenal in Lhasa, Tibet's capital.The one-day demonstration by more than 100 Tibetan monks, herdsmen and workers in Gongju County near Tibet's border with Sichuan Province was broken up by several hundred army troops, according to Chinese officials quoted by a Western news agency.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 1, 2008
BEIJING -- A gun battle in a rural area of northwest China earlier this week left a policeman and Tibetan insurgent dead, according to state-run media. It was China's first official admission that any Tibetans have died in the anti-government unrest that began in mid-March. The incident, according to the Xinhua news agency, occurred in Qinghai province after the police tried to arrest a man who they say led a group of herders seeking to incite a riot a week after the March 14 disturbances that shook Lhasa, the capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region.
NEWS
March 27, 2008
In ancient Greece, war was suspended so athletes could compete in the Olympics. This year, the 130-day torch relay to the Beijing Summer Olympics is serving as the venue for a public relations war over China's repressive policies in Tibet. Protests along the torch route should keep China's dismal human rights record front and center. China can't expect a pass on this most sensitive issue in the run-up to the Games. The Olympics is a unique opportunity for host cities to showcase their accomplishments, and China is no exception.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 1996
BEIJING -- A leading dissident monk died this month in a prison in Tibet, where the Chinese authorities are carrying out a campaign for tighter political control, international human rights groups reported late Friday.As Chinese armed forces struggle to keep a lid on protests that have broken out in several Tibetan monasteries in recent months, news of the monk's death is likely to add to the political tension.The monk, Kelsang Thutop, 49, died July 5 in Drapchi Prison in Lhasa, the Tibetan capital, where he was serving an 18-year sentence for political subversion, said Amnesty International and the Tibet Information Network, both London-based human rights groups.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 30, 2008
SHANGHAI, China -- A group of foreign diplomats, including an official from the United States, completed a two-day visit to Tibet yesterday amid conflicting reports of renewed pro-independence protests there and a possible weapons cache and mass arrests at a Buddhist monastery in southwestern China. Late yesterday, Tibet's government in exile said that there were protests near the Jokhang Temple in the capital, Lhasa, and that parts of the city were shut down, Reuters reported. Several Lhasa residents reached by telephone, however, said they heard about a scuffle between police officers and peddlers in a food market.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Explorers have finally found Shangri-La.It may not be quite the storied, verdant, utopian Himalayan paradise of James Hilton's 1933 novel "Lost Horizon" and the movies of the same name.But it is verdant, it is a kind of paradise and it is hidden deep within Tibet's Himalayan Mountains in a monstrously steep gorge within a gorge. There is no record of any human visiting, or even seeing, the area before.Tucked beneath a mountain spur at a sharp bend of the Tsangpo River, where the cliff sides are only 75 yards apart and cast perpetual shadows, the place failed to show up even on satellite surveillance photographs of the area.
FEATURES
By Todd Shapera and Todd Shapera,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 1997
In the cooling air of the early evening, as we entered Argentina's fertile Mendoza valley, the Andes began to soar over the horizon. We followed the sunset and soon were enveloped by a mountain canyon that followed the banks of the Mendoza River, with its sweeping bends displaying flashes of white water.About 20 miles farther west, we turned onto a bumpy, steep dirt road to reach the remote hamlet of El Salto. Here, our $55-a-night cabin sat on a small, verdant plateau surrounded by high peaks.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | May 25, 1993
BEIJING -- A major protest erupted yesterday in Lhasa, the Tibetan capital, with at least 1,000 demonstrators throwing stones at government buildings and police responding with tear gas and perhaps gunfire, Western travelers from there said last night.The unrest, which began yesterday morning and continued into the evening, was provoked by price increases and taxes, the Westerners said in telephone interviews.But it also likely was aimed at the bitter issue of Chinese rule of the Himalayan region, for Sunday marked the anniversary of China's "peaceful liberation" of Tibet in 1951 -- which many Tibetans still view as an illegal invasion of their homeland.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 30, 2008
SHANGHAI, China -- A group of foreign diplomats, including an official from the United States, completed a two-day visit to Tibet yesterday amid conflicting reports of renewed pro-independence protests there and a possible weapons cache and mass arrests at a Buddhist monastery in southwestern China. Late yesterday, Tibet's government in exile said that there were protests near the Jokhang Temple in the capital, Lhasa, and that parts of the city were shut down, Reuters reported. Several Lhasa residents reached by telephone, however, said they heard about a scuffle between police officers and peddlers in a food market.
NEWS
March 27, 2008
In ancient Greece, war was suspended so athletes could compete in the Olympics. This year, the 130-day torch relay to the Beijing Summer Olympics is serving as the venue for a public relations war over China's repressive policies in Tibet. Protests along the torch route should keep China's dismal human rights record front and center. China can't expect a pass on this most sensitive issue in the run-up to the Games. The Olympics is a unique opportunity for host cities to showcase their accomplishments, and China is no exception.
NEWS
By Ching-Ching Ni and Ching-Ching Ni,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 2008
BEIJING -- A Chinese shopkeeper in Tibet's capital came out of hiding yesterday for the first time since mobs ransacked his herb store last week during the biggest uprising against the region's Chinese rulers in nearly two decades. Ma Zhonglong, 20, said he had had nothing but a few packets of instant noodles to eat since he ran for cover Friday when he saw hundreds of Tibetans smash and burn storefronts near the Jokhang Temple, the religious and geographical heart of Lhasa, the Tibetan capital.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick | March 17, 2008
BEIJING -- Defying a major deployment of Chinese security forces, ethnic Tibetan protesters unfurled their forbidden national flag and set fire to a police station as the violence that by some reports has claimed 80 lives spread into Sichuan province and other parts of western China. The exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, met yesterday with reporters in the mountain town of Dharamsala, India, and told them he was powerless to stop the protests. "It's a people's movement, so it's up to them.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,Los Angeles Times | March 16, 2008
XIAHE, China -- As undercover police prowled through crowds of pilgrims bedecked in traditional embroidered Tibetan costumes, the monk in the bright purple robe looked around to make sure no one was watching. Then he smiled defiantly and raised his fist. Hours earlier yesterday, in a new eruption of long-hidden Tibetan resolve and pride that has challenged the Beijing regime just months before it hosts the Summer Olympics, monks and ordinary Tibetans reportedly attacked a police station, overturned cars and raised a banned national flag in this holy city just outside the Tibet Autonomous Region.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | March 13, 2008
Cecil Archer Rush, a retired government scientist who spent much of his life collecting scholarly books and art from Tibet and India, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Northwood resident was 90. Born in Dillwyn, Va., he was the son of a letter carrier who recognized his child's love of learning. The young Mr. Rush was home schooled initially and supplemented his education by having books mailed from the Richmond public library. He earned a degree in physics and chemistry from the College of William and Mary and studied for a doctorate at the University of Texas in Austin until 1940.
NEWS
September 16, 1993
Three decades are just a blip the way Asian history is usually measured, so the border dispute between China and India hardly ranks as ancient. Still, it has been one of the more intractable disputes on that continent. Word that it is apparently on its way to peaceful resolution is welcome news.The two giants of Asia fought a short but bloody border war in some of the world's roughest terrain in 1962. With one important exception, all of the factors that led to that conflict appear to have been eliminated.
FEATURES
September 7, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/Caricature Zone is available in which languages?Tibet is under which country's occupation?Where would you find a biting bullet ant? (Go to http://www.orkin.com/danger/ to find out.)FUNNY FACESDo your ears stick out? Maybe you have a goofy haircut. Well these are the kinds of things a caricature artist loves. Caricature artists draw cartoon-like pictures of real people by exaggerating the features that make them look unique.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and By Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | February 9, 2003
Nothing satisfies like a good old-fashioned adventure story, and Jonathan Falla's first novel, Blue Poppies (Delta, 2240 pages, $11.95 softbound), is a model of the genre. Set in 1950 on the eve of the Chinese invasion of Tibet, the story follows Jamie Wilson, a young Scotsman who is hired to establish a radio outpost in a remote Himalayan village called Jyeko. Captivated by the majestic landscape and its hardy inhabitants, Jamie falls in love with a beautiful, crippled widow named Puton who has been shunned by the villagers because they believe her deformity will bring bad luck.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 7, 2002
EASTERN TIBET, China - Evening is approaching, and 10-year-old Maju Dorje has one last chore on the mountainside. He has to coax home a herd of baby yaks. He yells at them, hurls rocks at them, chases the animals down a steep, scrubby slope toward his family's tent, and finally in a chorus of grunts they arrive. One of Maju's sisters is waiting to grab each yak by the collar and tether it to a rope line. His mother is waiting with a dinner of sheep's ribs and noodles cooked over a yak dung fire.
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