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EXPLORE
October 4, 2011
If you're a history buff but don't fancy walking up and down Ellicott City's hills, take note of the new literary (and stationary) tour at Tea on the Tiber. Now you can have a seat and a sweet in the charming teahouse while listening to stories of famous folks who passed through the mill town, such as H.L. Mencken, Washington Irving, Davy Crockett and Robert E. Lee. Even the Union soldiers encamped on the hill in 1862 had something to say about their time spent here: “By rugged hills and busy mills, over dams and rocks a splashing; From wooded plains, the rumbling trains, come 'round the mountains dashing.” To hear the rest of the poem and the stories of the people mentioned above and more, register with the Ellicott City Restoration Foundation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Great conversation while dinning on delicate cucumber sandwiches. Hot, buttery scones fresh from the oven. Zesty smooth lemon curd. And don't forget the clotted cream. There's nothing like a traditional afternoon tea. Long associated with ladies of leisure, tea has experienced a resurgence in recent years at area tea rooms as people looking for a slowed-down celebration of refinement have discovered the pastime. It's not just elite, pinkie-raised women sipping on a cuppa — a new generation of women is embracing the afternoon tea as a venue for baby showers, bridal showers, gatherings of friends, and even weddings.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | January 7, 2007
Perched on a hillside above historic Ellicott City's Main Street, Howard County's new 25-unit Tiber-Hudson apartment building was designed as a welcome refuge for vulnerable older people. The earth-tone block, brick and glass building is owned by the county's Housing Commission and is designed for those ages 62 and older with limited incomes and who are struggling with a variety of medical and housing problems. The three-story, $3 million building is intended to allow residents to stay, even as they become more frail.
EXPLORE
October 4, 2011
If you're a history buff but don't fancy walking up and down Ellicott City's hills, take note of the new literary (and stationary) tour at Tea on the Tiber. Now you can have a seat and a sweet in the charming teahouse while listening to stories of famous folks who passed through the mill town, such as H.L. Mencken, Washington Irving, Davy Crockett and Robert E. Lee. Even the Union soldiers encamped on the hill in 1862 had something to say about their time spent here: “By rugged hills and busy mills, over dams and rocks a splashing; From wooded plains, the rumbling trains, come 'round the mountains dashing.” To hear the rest of the poem and the stories of the people mentioned above and more, register with the Ellicott City Restoration Foundation.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2004
Chisha Johnson fondly remembers the daily ritual of afternoon tea at the boarding schools she attended while growing up in England as the daughter of a diplomat. Now the Columbia resident enjoys introducing the tea habit to her 11-year-old daughter, Elysha. "We love tea," Johnson said as she and Elysha sat at a corner table on a recent afternoon at Tea on the Tiber, which opened last month on Main Street in historic Ellicott City. "It's a girls' day, just a time for us," said Johnson, who nibbled on a scone and sipped a chai brew while her daughter ate a cinnamon roll with an apricot blend.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1993
The owners of the Colonnade condominium and hotel complex plan to try next week to stop a creditors' bid to force the complex into bankruptcy.Colonnade attorney Paul Nussbaum was on vacation yesterday and could not be reached for comment. But Lawrence Yumkas, a lawyer in Mr. Nussbaum's firm of Whiteford, Taylor and Preston, said legal papers would be filed soon.Washington-based Tiber Construction Co. and two other creditors filed a petition Tuesday to force Colonnade L.P., which owns the Colonnade, into involuntary Chapter 7 bankruptcy, which provides for liquidation of the company.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | July 14, 1993
The auction of The Colonnade, home to one of Baltimore's fanciest luxury hotels and the Polo Grill restaurant, was halted at the last minute yesterday after three creditors sought to force the partnership that owns the upscale development into bankruptcy.The involuntary bankruptcy petition, filed in federal court in Baltimore, was a surprise move on the part of the creditors, who claimed they were owed a total of nearly $4 million.The step came just hours before the property was to be auctioned off because of the partnership's default on a $22 million construction loan to the Marine Midland Realty Credit Corp.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | October 27, 1996
25 years ago (week of Oct. 24-30, 1971):Three homes on New Cut Road in Ellicott City were condemned by Howard County and deemed "unfit for human habitation." The houses, which were rented for $8 per week, had no running water. The only sanitary facilities were outdoor toilets, which allegedly had been constructed by the landlord only after condemnation signs had been posted on the property.50 years ago (week of Oct. 20-26, 1946):Major paving work is under way near the railroad depot in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | January 29, 1992
Workmen began turning an Ellicott City eyesore into a haven for the footsore last week with the start of construction of a "pocket park" connecting lower Main Street to Tiber Alley.The $112,000 project involves building a brick-paved footbridge across the Tiber branch ofthe Patapsco River and setting up five park benches and a picnic table among shrubs on slices of land on either side of the creek."We're pretty thrilled about it, because first of all, it's getting rid of an eyesore," said Kathy Chambers, a board member of the Ellicott City Business Association.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun Old Angler's Inn The Sun Sidestreets The Sunday Sun | January 25, 1992
Dimitri'sDimitri's, 2205 Frederick Road, Catonsville, (410) 747-1927. If you want good Greek food, I usually say go to Greektown. But Dimitri's, which is partly suburban and partly down-home, can hold its own among the area's Greek restaurants. It's a casual, friendly place that seems to enjoy great popularity among residents of Catonsville, Ellicott City and thereabouts. Through the restaurant's swinging door is a bar that features country music on weekends. The food is authentic and full of flavor.
NEWS
March 23, 2007
Ravens' Stover to talk about dads, sons Baltimore Ravens kicker Matt Stover will discuss authentic father-son relationships and what it means to be a "Real Deal Dad" at 8:30 a.m. tomorrow at Oakland Mills High School, 9410 Kilimanjaro Road in Columbia. Also, Gatorade is sponsoring a Junior Training Camp for elementary and middle school-age sons who accompany their fathers. A light breakfast will be provided. "Our theme for this year is `connections,' and this event will help the school connect with fathers, and fathers connect with their sons," said Oakland Mills High School Principal Frank Eastham said in a statement.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
The Tiber Hudson Stream Team, which conducted five cleanup sessions Saturday mornings along the Tiber Hudson River and its banks in Ellicott City's historic district, has reported removing 2,819 pounds of trash from the river in the course of its fall project. Volunteers from Howard Community College and other adults participated in the project, which was sponsored by Friends of the Patapsco Valley and Heritage Greenway Inc. in partnership with the Howard County Tourism Office, Ellicott City Restoration Foundation, community residents and business owners, who helped pay for supplies.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | January 7, 2007
Perched on a hillside above historic Ellicott City's Main Street, Howard County's new 25-unit Tiber-Hudson apartment building was designed as a welcome refuge for vulnerable older people. The earth-tone block, brick and glass building is owned by the county's Housing Commission and is designed for those ages 62 and older with limited incomes and who are struggling with a variety of medical and housing problems. The three-story, $3 million building is intended to allow residents to stay, even as they become more frail.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2004
A meal at the new tea room in Ellicott City, Tea on the Tiber, can be a lovely experience, as long as you follow the rules. The small space, on the ground floor of an interior decorating shop in the historic downtown, is charming, from the crackling fireplace in the front hall to the deep eggplant walls and elaborate china place settings on highly polished wood tables. Classical music plays, and servers drift about in black dresses with white ruffled pinafores. But patrons who think they can just wander in for a meal will be disappointed.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2004
Chisha Johnson fondly remembers the daily ritual of afternoon tea at the boarding schools she attended while growing up in England as the daughter of a diplomat. Now the Columbia resident enjoys introducing the tea habit to her 11-year-old daughter, Elysha. "We love tea," Johnson said as she and Elysha sat at a corner table on a recent afternoon at Tea on the Tiber, which opened last month on Main Street in historic Ellicott City. "It's a girls' day, just a time for us," said Johnson, who nibbled on a scone and sipped a chai brew while her daughter ate a cinnamon roll with an apricot blend.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 22, 2002
Rarely do I begin a review of a restaurant by talking about parking. But the Tiber River Tavern is in Ellicott City, and those who know the historic district will understand that convenient parking is as important as, say, a fine rib-eye steak. Ellicott City's newest restaurant is just a few minutes walk away from a large, for the most part free, parking lot behind Main Street and just across Old Columbia Pike. Look for Parking Lot D. That said, the Tiber River Tavern also has a fine rib-eye steak going for it. The kitchen gussies the meat up with lots of blue cheese melted on top and candied walnuts -- don't roll your eyes -- but the quality of the well-marbled beef shines through.
NEWS
March 23, 2007
Ravens' Stover to talk about dads, sons Baltimore Ravens kicker Matt Stover will discuss authentic father-son relationships and what it means to be a "Real Deal Dad" at 8:30 a.m. tomorrow at Oakland Mills High School, 9410 Kilimanjaro Road in Columbia. Also, Gatorade is sponsoring a Junior Training Camp for elementary and middle school-age sons who accompany their fathers. A light breakfast will be provided. "Our theme for this year is `connections,' and this event will help the school connect with fathers, and fathers connect with their sons," said Oakland Mills High School Principal Frank Eastham said in a statement.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | May 1, 1995
Have you seen the big banner draped across Ellicott City's Main Street? It announces the annual May Arts Festival, which will be held Saturday.This year, you can hear the festival's theme, "The Music of Art and the Art of Music," in the air, performed by the Maryland Youth Symphony, co-sponsors of the event. Five pocket-parks in the town will serve as entertainment areas, with the Youth Symphony providing musical entertainment.Bozette the Clown will stroll while performing magical tricks and balloon sculptures for the children.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
An Ellicott City group is offering an exchange that it says will improve two streams that run through the historic town: It'll give you trees if you'll plant them. A nominal fee is involved - $5 a tree - but most of the project's cost is covered by a grant from the Environmental Protection Agency. The Ellicott City Restoration Foundation hopes that planting trees within the watershed of Tiber and Hudson streams will reduce erosion and pollutants in the water. The two streams run through historic Ellicott City and flow into the Patapsco River, which empties into the Chesapeake Bay. The streams' watershed surrounds the city's historic district, which means that any rainwater falling in the area flows into the Tiber or Hudson, said Jacquelyn Galke, project director of the foundation's Tiber-Hudson Watershed Partnership.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | October 27, 1996
25 years ago (week of Oct. 24-30, 1971):Three homes on New Cut Road in Ellicott City were condemned by Howard County and deemed "unfit for human habitation." The houses, which were rented for $8 per week, had no running water. The only sanitary facilities were outdoor toilets, which allegedly had been constructed by the landlord only after condemnation signs had been posted on the property.50 years ago (week of Oct. 20-26, 1946):Major paving work is under way near the railroad depot in Ellicott City.
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