Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTiananmen Square
IN THE NEWS

Tiananmen Square

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 6, 2000
BEIJING -- The Year of the Dragon arrived amid violence on Tiananmen Square, but hundreds of millions of Chinese elsewhere greeted the new lunar year happily yesterday with fireworks and raucous celebrations. More than 50 Falun Gong members were kicked, beaten and detained during the first few minutes of the new year on the square in central Beijing as police broke up the biggest protest in months by the outlawed spiritual group. Trouble began shortly before midnight, when dozens of members of the sect emerged from a pedestrian tunnel that opens onto the square and sat down in protest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
March 4, 2013
Caitlin Hennegan, a 2010 graduate of the John Carroll School, has had quite a year. Over the summer, Hennegan was awarded a student grant from the University of Maryland to study at Nankai University as part of the university's study abroad program. The focus of the trip was to study Chinese languages and culture. After completing her studies, Hennegan spent an additional three weeks at Tsinghua University's Immersion Camp as volunteer teaching English to Chinese adults. On weekends, she had the opportunity to take in the sites such as the Great Wall, Mount Tai and Tiananmen Square.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 14, 2001
BEIJING - Hundreds of thousands of people streamed into the streets of the Chinese capital last night to celebrate Beijing's selection as the host city for the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in one of the biggest block parties this nation has seen in many years. Beijing's otherwise staid downtown spontaneously erupted in good cheer as cars jammed the roads and filled the air with a cacophony of honking horns. Passengers stuck out of windows and sunroofs, waving whatever they could find: red Chinese flags, old T-shirts, crumpled newspapers, feather dusters and badminton rackets.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
BEIJING -- Everywhere in the Chinese capital, it seems, something new is on the rise - or something old is being renovated. These changes largely were spurred by the 2008 Olympics but will leave a lasting mark. Here are some of the things visitors will find going up around Beijing. A third terminal at Beijing Capital International Airport, about 15 miles northeast of the city, is scheduled for completion this year. It was designed by Norman Foster, the architect responsible for London's Stansted and Hong Kong's Chek Lap Kok airports, and it is expected to welcome 43 million passengers a year.
SPORTS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 23, 2001
BEIJING - In the underground walkways that lead to Tiananmen Square, police strung yellow cordons yesterday where they checked each visitor's identification card and rummaged through their bags. On the plaza above, where everyone could see, the authorities were subtler. Police monitored the crosswalks leading into the square, but did not routinely accost people. One reason: They didn't want to show how repressive they were. The scenes on and below Tiananmen Square are a metaphor of sorts for the way Beijing is handling this week's visit by delegates from the International Olympic Committee (IOC)
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 1, 1998
BEIJING -- Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright praised the way China is openly approaching its many problems as she ended a two-day trip yesterday in preparation for President Clinton's visit late this month -- the first by a U.S. president since the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 6, 2003
HONG KONG - Hong Kong's chief executive, bowing to public pressure, announced yesterday that he was withdrawing internal-security legislation that had provoked huge protests in July. The retreat by Tung Chee-hwa, the chief executive, is a startling setback for Beijing, which rarely yields to popular demand. Beijing had insisted for much of the past year that Hong Kong pass stringent security laws as soon as possible. Tung mounted a campaign to persuade the public that the bill's opponents were unpatriotic people who disliked China and, in the words of Qian Qichen, until recently China's deputy prime minister, had "devils in their hearts."
EXPLORE
March 4, 2013
Caitlin Hennegan, a 2010 graduate of the John Carroll School, has had quite a year. Over the summer, Hennegan was awarded a student grant from the University of Maryland to study at Nankai University as part of the university's study abroad program. The focus of the trip was to study Chinese languages and culture. After completing her studies, Hennegan spent an additional three weeks at Tsinghua University's Immersion Camp as volunteer teaching English to Chinese adults. On weekends, she had the opportunity to take in the sites such as the Great Wall, Mount Tai and Tiananmen Square.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 1, 2000
BEIJING -- In a sign of the times in this nominally Communist country, Beijingers rang in the New Year by flocking to department stores to take advantage of sales on everything from wide-screen televisions to wool scarves. New Year's Eve is not traditionally a big date on the Chinese calendar -- not the Western one, anyway -- but tens of thousands of people poured into the streets of the capital last night to watch fireworks displays, stroll across Tiananmen Square and hunt for bargains.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 2000
BEIJING -- China's state-controlled media acknowledged for the first time yesterday the government's persistent difficulty in stamping out the banned Falun Gong spiritual movement, even as fresh allegations emerged about police brutality toward its practitioners held in detention. Three jailed members of the movement have died as a result of beatings or hunger strikes in the past month, according to human rights groups and family members, bringing the total number of deaths to 15. The government has been mostly silent about Falun Gong in recent months, and the state media have never openly acknowledged the sporadic silent protests by small groups of its members on Tiananmen Square over the past nine months.
NEWS
By Gary Hogan | August 29, 2005
SHORTLY AFTER seizing power in 1949, China's Chairman Mao Tse-tung had a plan: He considered mobilizing all comrades in the new communist state to kill a daily quota of flies and mosquitoes in an attempt to reduce insect-borne disease among his mainly peasant masses. He did. They did. And it worked. The 1950s "Four Pests" campaign was one of many launched by the Great Helmsman in nearly 30 years as supreme leader of the People's Republic of China. Some were successful; the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution were disastrous.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall and Mark Magnier and Tyler Marshall and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 5, 2004
HONG KONG - Tens of thousands of demonstrators crowded into a Hong Kong park yesterday to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre with a candlelight vigil, songs and exhortations to build a democratic China. Organizers said 82,000 people attended the event, while police put the number at closer to 50,000. The crowd, which included many families and young people, stretched the quarter-mile length of Hong Kong's Victoria Park. In Beijing, police equipped with metal detectors and nightsticks guarded every entrance to the Chinese capital's main square, but the number of visitors was lighter than usual because of intermittent drizzle throughout much of the day. No violence was reported in either city.
NEWS
June 5, 2004
NATIONAL Bush begins 3-day Europe trip President Bush began a three-day visit to Europe yesterday, marking the beginning of a month of foreign travel and summits. His advisers hope that after weeks of dispiriting news from Iraq, Bush will appear through a more positive lens, one that could restore confidence in his leadership and his ability to work with U.S. allies. [Page 1a] Danforth picked for envoy to U.N. Former Sen. John C. Danforth of Missouri was chosen yesterday to be U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.
NEWS
By Gady Epstein and Gady Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 4, 2004
HONG KONG - The latest history textbooks here contain something new about China's recent past. For the first time, there is at least a reference to the events that occurred 15 years ago today, when the People's Liberation Army carried out a violent, bloody crackdown against thousands of protesters in Beijing's Tiananmen Square demonstrating in favor of greater democracy. But the textbook versions of that pivotal day in Chinese history are brief and make no mention that soldiers killed hundreds of the protesters.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 6, 2003
HONG KONG - Hong Kong's chief executive, bowing to public pressure, announced yesterday that he was withdrawing internal-security legislation that had provoked huge protests in July. The retreat by Tung Chee-hwa, the chief executive, is a startling setback for Beijing, which rarely yields to popular demand. Beijing had insisted for much of the past year that Hong Kong pass stringent security laws as soon as possible. Tung mounted a campaign to persuade the public that the bill's opponents were unpatriotic people who disliked China and, in the words of Qian Qichen, until recently China's deputy prime minister, had "devils in their hearts."
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 5, 2002
WASHINGTON - What's going on in Iran today is, without question, the most promising trend in the Muslim world. It is a combination of Martin Luther and Tiananmen Square - a drive for an Islamic reformation combined with a spontaneous student-led democracy movement. This movement faces a formidable opponent in Iran's conservative clerical leadership. It can't provide a quick fix to what ails relations between Islam and the West today. There is none. But it is still hugely important, because it reflects a deepening understanding by many Iranian Muslims that to thrive in the modern era they, and other Muslims, need an Islam different from the lifeless, anti-modern, anti-Western fundamentalism being imposed in Iran and propagated by the Saudi Wahhabi clerics.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 24, 2001
BEIJING - Five members of the banned spiritual meditation group Falun Gong set themselves on fire yesterday in a suicide attempt at Tiananmen Square on the eve of Chinese New Year, according to Xinhua, China's government-run news service. A woman died, and four men were injured and taken to a hospital by police, said Xinhua, which blamed the act on "the heresy of Li Hongzhi, ringleader of the evil cult Falun Gong." Falun Gong members in Hong Kong denied that the group was behind the act, saying it ran counter to the lessons of compassion, tolerance and forbearance taught by Li, the group's exiled leader.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Nancy Pelosi attributes her intolerance for Chinese human rights abuses in part to her late father -- former Baltimore Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr. -- who, she says, instilled in his children a firm belief that when people need help, the last thing to do is turn away. "As a girl, I knew what to do if someone called needing a bed in City Hospitals," said the San Francisco Democrat. "I knew how to place people in housing projects or on welfare. My parents' home was a place where people came to find respect."
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 15, 2002
BEIJING - The Communist Party of China ushered in a new, younger generation of leaders this morning by naming Hu Jintao as the party's general secretary, succeeding Jiang Zemin, and appointing Hu and eight other men as members of the committee responsible for steering the nation. Long expected, Hu's ascension marks the first transition of leadership in Communist China without death, purges or turmoil. Jiang became general secretary in 1989 after the bloody crackdown at Tiananmen Square and the purging of a reformist predecessor.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 8, 2002
BEIJING - The last time power changed hands at the top of China's Communist Party, the event was preceded by hundreds of thousands of students leading demonstrations in Beijing's Tiananmen Square and other cities demanding democratic reforms. Thirteen years later, President Jiang Zemin, 76, is set to surrender his post as general secretary of the Communist Party to his anointed successor, Vice President Hu Jintao, 59, at the party congress that opens today. And China's young, bright minds are too busy having fun and planning careers to stop and take note.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.