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By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 11, 2001
WASHINGTON - The city's newest stars made their debut at the National Zoo yesterday, two ready-for-prime-time pandas working the public like a pair of Washington professionals. Romping across a grassy lawn right on cue, they submitted to countless photo sessions, soaked up applause and waited to be adored. (It didn't take long.) The opening of the giant panda exhibition formally introduced the nation to these new celebrities, who, like stage divas, immediately began chewing up the scenery.
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TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | October 15, 2006
National Zoo's Asia Trail If you've yet to see the panda cub Tai Shan (and his parents Mei Xiang and Tian Tian) at the National Zoo in Washington, this week would be an ideal time to make the visit. Tuesday marks the grand opening of the zoo's new Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat and Asia Trail. At the Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat, visitors will be able to view the pandas playing, climbing and relaxing in an area that mimics the terrain of their native China. The new habitat adds more than 12,000 square feet to the panda exhibit and features pools and streams, rocks, shrubs and trees, a water-cooled grotto and a fog grove.
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NEWS
By Tom Lasseter and Tom Lasseter,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 3, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Millions of dollars invested. Teams of elite scientists. An international trade agreement. Media coverage that money couldn't buy. The enterprise is pandas, giant pandas, and now, giant panda sex. The National Zoo's female panda is 3 1/2 , nearing what some believe to be reproductive age. So talk about a new panda generation has begun, although it is by no means certain that the pandas are listening. The pandas, Mei Xiang (may-SHONG) and Tian Tian (tee-YEN), are huge in Washington.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Celebrity pregnancies are media magnets. But no human movie star has had to endure a Web site displaying her hormone charts, regular updates on her behavior and live shots of her bedroom interactions with the man in her life. Then again, the survival of the species is unlikely to depend on the resulting baby, as is the case with Mei Xiang and her mate, Tian Tian, the stars of the National Zoo's Giant Panda Exhibit. The fascination with the pandas' sex lives has been a springtime Washington ritual for many years, and the zoo is using its Web site, nationalzoo.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | October 15, 2006
National Zoo's Asia Trail If you've yet to see the panda cub Tai Shan (and his parents Mei Xiang and Tian Tian) at the National Zoo in Washington, this week would be an ideal time to make the visit. Tuesday marks the grand opening of the zoo's new Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat and Asia Trail. At the Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat, visitors will be able to view the pandas playing, climbing and relaxing in an area that mimics the terrain of their native China. The new habitat adds more than 12,000 square feet to the panda exhibit and features pools and streams, rocks, shrubs and trees, a water-cooled grotto and a fog grove.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,Special to the Sun | January 14, 2001
Kids cut school, adults skipped out of work, and even seasoned keepers at the National Zoo in Washington couldn't help but get swept up in the panda-monium this week as Tian Tian and Mei Xiang, those cuddly black-and-white bears, were introduced to an adoring public. The pandas, whose sprawling, $1.8 million renovated home nearly rivals the cost of the Washington abode recently bought by Bill and Hillary Clinton, are expected to more than pay for their keep: Their playful presence is expected to increase the number of visitors to the zoo by 20 percent annually.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Celebrity pregnancies are media magnets. But no human movie star has had to endure a Web site displaying her hormone charts, regular updates on her behavior and live shots of her bedroom interactions with the man in her life. Then again, the survival of the species is unlikely to depend on the resulting baby, as is the case with Mei Xiang and her mate, Tian Tian, the stars of the National Zoo's Giant Panda Exhibit. The fascination with the pandas' sex lives has been a springtime Washington ritual for many years, and the zoo is using its Web site, nationalzoo.
NEWS
February 21, 2001
Reading by 9 is a project aimed at helping Baltimore-area students learn to read well by third grade. This section will offer advice, resources and stories designed to help parents and children have fun reading together. PANDAMANIA Welcome Mei Xiang and Tian Tian at the Giant Pandas at the Smithsonian National Zoo Web site at pandas.si.edu. The site features tons of great pictures and a live Pandacam. Follow the links about panda research, and examine the map of the pandas' cool habitat.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Truman Show is now playing at the National Zoo, and it's a hit. But this time the star is not Jim Carrey, portraying a man living in a manufactured city populated by actors pretending to be his family, his every move captured on camera and beamed around the world. No, the star now is a baby panda that doesn't even have a name but has already won a place on the computer desktops, and in the hearts, of thousands. "Oh my God, he's so cute," said Beth Lacey Gill, a publications specialist at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, who logs onto the panda's Web site daily.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | November 5, 2006
Do athletes wear bows in their hair? Nine area cheerleading teams said they do as they brought an energetic combination of athleticism and showmanship to the fall South Regional high school championship at Reservoir High School in Howard County on Thursday night. Teams of 20 girls - every one sporting a beribboned ponytail and makeup - danced, shouted, threw each other in the air, flipped, cartwheeled and formed human pyramids in relentless 2 1/2 -minute routines that left the competitors breathless and, in some cases, needing ice packs and bandages.
NEWS
By Tom Lasseter and Tom Lasseter,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 3, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Millions of dollars invested. Teams of elite scientists. An international trade agreement. Media coverage that money couldn't buy. The enterprise is pandas, giant pandas, and now, giant panda sex. The National Zoo's female panda is 3 1/2 , nearing what some believe to be reproductive age. So talk about a new panda generation has begun, although it is by no means certain that the pandas are listening. The pandas, Mei Xiang (may-SHONG) and Tian Tian (tee-YEN), are huge in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,Special to the Sun | January 14, 2001
Kids cut school, adults skipped out of work, and even seasoned keepers at the National Zoo in Washington couldn't help but get swept up in the panda-monium this week as Tian Tian and Mei Xiang, those cuddly black-and-white bears, were introduced to an adoring public. The pandas, whose sprawling, $1.8 million renovated home nearly rivals the cost of the Washington abode recently bought by Bill and Hillary Clinton, are expected to more than pay for their keep: Their playful presence is expected to increase the number of visitors to the zoo by 20 percent annually.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 11, 2001
WASHINGTON - The city's newest stars made their debut at the National Zoo yesterday, two ready-for-prime-time pandas working the public like a pair of Washington professionals. Romping across a grassy lawn right on cue, they submitted to countless photo sessions, soaked up applause and waited to be adored. (It didn't take long.) The opening of the giant panda exhibition formally introduced the nation to these new celebrities, who, like stage divas, immediately began chewing up the scenery.
FEATURES
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The camera lights were so bright that it looked as though a spaceship had touched down in the thicket of bamboo outside the panda exhibit, and perhaps one had. Certainly it seemed like every earthbound news outlet was there: television crews from China, Russia and England, writers from both U.S. coasts. All told, about 100 journalists clamored to pose the important questions of the day: Did he get mommy's round eye spots or daddy's bean-shaped ones? He doesn't look like a stick of butter anymore - does he?
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | November 5, 2006
Do athletes wear bows in their hair? Nine area cheerleading teams said they do as they brought an energetic combination of athleticism and showmanship to the fall South Regional high school championship Thursday night at Reservoir High School. Teams of 20 girls - every one sporting a beribboned ponytail and makeup - danced, shouted, threw each other into the air, flipped, cartwheeled and formed human pyramids in relentless 2 1/2 -minute routines that left competitors breathless and, in some cases, needing ice packs and bandages.
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