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Thyroid Hormone

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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | February 15, 1994
Q: When I saw my doctor about a swelling in the front of my neck, he told me that I have a goiter and ordered some blood tests. What is a goiter and how is it likely to affect me?A: Goiter is a general term for an enlargement of the thyroid gland. With an enlarged thyroid, production of thyroid hormone can be excessive (hyperthyroidism), reduced (hypothyroidism) or normal.Goiters are rarely due to thyroid cancers, but an occasional thyroid malignancy may cause generalized enlargement of the thyroid.
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NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | September 1, 2008
I was prescribed Advair for asthma. It worked well for my breathing problem, but my skin became thin, and I started bruising badly. Then I experienced horrible damage to my skin, with deep gashes from a slight bump. One day, I leaned on the bathroom counter, and several inches of the skin on my arm peeled off. My lung specialist insisted Advair was not responsible for thinning skin. My pharmacist said it could be from steroids. She checked my meds and told me Advair contains a steroid. My doctor still said it was not the medication.
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HEALTH
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | September 11, 1990
*Q* What is the difference between hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and Hashimoto's Disease? How long would it take someone with Hashimoto's who is not getting treated for it to experience problems, and what kind of problems would she encounter?*A* Hyperthyroidism results from overproduction of thyroid hormone, while hypothyroidism is inadequate formation of thyroid hormone. Hashimoto's is a specific disease of the thyroid gland that is one of the most common causes of hypothyroidism.People with Hashimoto's have chronic inflammation of the thyroid gland (thyroiditis)
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | July 3, 2008
When researching my master's thesis for the preservation of a historic road, I hiked the old road with a local man. We walked through a field of shoulder-high plants for about 50 yards when he turned to me and said, "I hope you're not allergic to poison ivy, because this is a field of it." When I noticed a small spot on one hand starting to itch, the man pulled a weed along a hedgerow where he said it usually grows. He crushed the weed to produce a small amount of liquid and rubbed it on the spot.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 1997
Over the past several weeks my husband noticed gradually increased swelling in his stomach. According to his doctor, the swelling is due to fluid. I would like to know what could cause this and what can be done about it?Ascites, the medical term for an accumulation of fluid within the abdominal (peritoneal) cavity, may progress slowly and not he noticed for several months because it usually causes no pain or other symptoms during the early stages.The first hint may come when a belt or clothing feels tight.
FEATURES
By Marian Uhlman and Marian Uhlman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 11, 1998
Another screening test has been added to the recommended list for women over 50: one to check whether the thyroid gland is working properly.The newly merged American College of Physicians and American Society of Internal Medicine recently developed the new screening guidelines. The thyroid gland produces hormones that help control metabolism. Too little hormone can make people appear sluggish, depressed and forgetful. They can feel chilly and gain weight. Too much hormone can make them nervous, heat-intolerant and prone to weight loss.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 1999
Faulty thyroid can be difficult to diagnose and to treatQ. For years I suffered with fatigue, weakness, hair loss, weight gain, constipation, lack of libido, dry, rough skin and memory loss. My doctor ran thyroid tests that came back "normal." Is it true that Premarin interferes with thyroid tests?Finally another doctor found that my TSH level was elevated. She put me on Synthroid and said I would feel better, but I woke up sweating profusely at night and often felt too warm during the day. I lost more than 15 pounds without even trying, but I didn't feel good.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,BOSTON GLOBE | June 25, 1996
Three years ago, Ruth Hertz, 66, a self-described little old lady, began feeling lousy. An avid tennis player, she found herself dragging around the court. "The tiredness sort of seemed to come on suddenly," she recalled last week.In fact, Hertz was "more than tired. I was lethargic. I was doing a lot of sleeping," she says, "and I was beginning to be a little depressed."She finally confided her growing list of symptoms to another woman in her water aerobics class who immediately -- and correctly -- diagnosed her problem: an underactive thyroid gland.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 24, 2005
I have been using a baby sunscreen for my 22-month-old son. It has an SPF of 30. Whenever we go out in the sun, I slather the stuff on and then slather on more throughout the day. Someone recently told me that sunscreen can be absorbed through the skin and get into the circulation. Is this true? Are there any dangers in using sunscreen daily on a toddler? Researchers have found that some popular sunscreen ingredients are absorbed from the skin and can be measured in the urine (Journal of Investigative Dermatology, July 2004)
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,Contributing Writers King Features Syndicate | October 19, 1993
Q: I've read that estrogen may play a role in breast cancer. If so, why do so many doctors prescribe hormone therapy and tell women it is absolutely safe?I developed breast cancer after years on estrogen, though there was no family history. Now I'm on tamoxifen. The doctors tell me this is absolutely safe too, but I am skeptical. What can you tell me about this anti-cancer drug?A: When it comes to drugs, there are no absolutes. Very few studies look at the long-term effects of medicines. This is especially true when it comes to the controversial connection between estrogen and breast cancer.
FEATURES
By Mary Beckman | October 4, 2007
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on Good Morning America that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks. Winfrey then wrote about her medical condition in the October issue of her magazine, O, elaborating that she had both kinds of thyroid disease -- an overactive thyroid and then an underactive one, both considered autoimmune diseases.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
For much of the 20th century, the drugs used to treat diabetes and thyroid disease were extracted from animals - mostly cows and pigs. That started to change in the 1960s, when scientists began to mass produce synthetic thyroid hormone in the lab. The change accelerated in the 1980s, when insulin became the first synthetic drug manufactured through genetic engineering. But not everyone considers the shift to synthetics a sign of progress. Of the millions of people who rely on hormone therapies, several thousand still insist that traditional, animal-derived drugs work better and are safer than the newer synthetic versions.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON | June 2, 2006
My husband and I want to start a family, so I take my temperature every day before I get out of bed. The record I keep lets us know when I have ovulated. The problem is the thermometer. It is an old-fashioned mercury thermometer we "borrowed" from his parents. He's very sweet about shaking it down and bringing it to me, but I am afraid he might break it. I worry that being exposed to mercury just before I get pregnant would be dangerous for the baby. He says other thermometers aren't as accurate.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 24, 2005
I have been using a baby sunscreen for my 22-month-old son. It has an SPF of 30. Whenever we go out in the sun, I slather the stuff on and then slather on more throughout the day. Someone recently told me that sunscreen can be absorbed through the skin and get into the circulation. Is this true? Are there any dangers in using sunscreen daily on a toddler? Researchers have found that some popular sunscreen ingredients are absorbed from the skin and can be measured in the urine (Journal of Investigative Dermatology, July 2004)
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 15, 2000
Q. Thank you for writing about Certo and grape juice. I was having excruciating pain in the metatarsal area of my foot, which caused me great difficulty walking. After two weeks of using Certo and grape juice as you described, my feet are free of pain. Why isn't this remedy more widely known? A. So far as we know, no research has been done to determine the effectiveness of grape juice and Certo (plant pectin used for making jelly) for joint pain. This remedy goes back at least to the 1940s, and we have heard from many people like you who have had success with it: "My hands used to be stiff when I'd get up in the morning, so I tried the Certo and grape juice.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 1999
Faulty thyroid can be difficult to diagnose and to treatQ. For years I suffered with fatigue, weakness, hair loss, weight gain, constipation, lack of libido, dry, rough skin and memory loss. My doctor ran thyroid tests that came back "normal." Is it true that Premarin interferes with thyroid tests?Finally another doctor found that my TSH level was elevated. She put me on Synthroid and said I would feel better, but I woke up sweating profusely at night and often felt too warm during the day. I lost more than 15 pounds without even trying, but I didn't feel good.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON | June 2, 2006
My husband and I want to start a family, so I take my temperature every day before I get out of bed. The record I keep lets us know when I have ovulated. The problem is the thermometer. It is an old-fashioned mercury thermometer we "borrowed" from his parents. He's very sweet about shaking it down and bringing it to me, but I am afraid he might break it. I worry that being exposed to mercury just before I get pregnant would be dangerous for the baby. He says other thermometers aren't as accurate.
FEATURES
By Mary Beckman | October 4, 2007
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on Good Morning America that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks. Winfrey then wrote about her medical condition in the October issue of her magazine, O, elaborating that she had both kinds of thyroid disease -- an overactive thyroid and then an underactive one, both considered autoimmune diseases.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | May 16, 1999
Q. Your column about the dangers of low cholesterol caught my attention. For years I avoided all fat in my diet, but then I was unable to conceive. After including fat in my diet briefly, I became pregnant, but lost the baby when I returned to my no-fat regimen.After the miscarriage, my gynecologist told me my cholesterol (94) was not sufficient for making the sex hormones I need to sustain a pregnancy. I changed my diet, raised my cholesterol to 114 and had a healthy, normal, successful pregnancy.
FEATURES
By Marian Uhlman and Marian Uhlman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 11, 1998
Another screening test has been added to the recommended list for women over 50: one to check whether the thyroid gland is working properly.The newly merged American College of Physicians and American Society of Internal Medicine recently developed the new screening guidelines. The thyroid gland produces hormones that help control metabolism. Too little hormone can make people appear sluggish, depressed and forgetful. They can feel chilly and gain weight. Too much hormone can make them nervous, heat-intolerant and prone to weight loss.
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