Advertisement
HomeCollectionsThyroid Gland
IN THE NEWS

Thyroid Gland

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2004
I noticed your comment on grapefruit juice raising blood levels of some medications. This is true, but as a medical doctor, I purposely use it to increase absorption of an expensive drug. Grapefruit does not actually improve absorption of medications. It does, however, interfere with the breakdown (metabolism) of dozens of drugs. In effect, that raises blood levels and increases the impact the drug has on the body. Your strategy does require careful monitoring. The grapefruit effect is highly variable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | May 11, 2009
Question: : Can vitamin D and turmeric in combination have an impact on allergy and asthma? I suffer from both allergies and asthma, and I am usually miserable in the spring. I started taking 2,000 IU of vitamin D daily several months ago. I am also taking turmeric capsules. This spring, I have had no allergies, no sinus infections and no asthma problems at all. Perhaps these supplements are keeping my immune system from overreacting to pollen. Answer:: Your experience is fascinating.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | September 11, 1990
*Q* What is the difference between hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and Hashimoto's Disease? How long would it take someone with Hashimoto's who is not getting treated for it to experience problems, and what kind of problems would she encounter?*A* Hyperthyroidism results from overproduction of thyroid hormone, while hypothyroidism is inadequate formation of thyroid hormone. Hashimoto's is a specific disease of the thyroid gland that is one of the most common causes of hypothyroidism.People with Hashimoto's have chronic inflammation of the thyroid gland (thyroiditis)
FEATURES
By Mary Beckman | October 4, 2007
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on Good Morning America that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks. Winfrey then wrote about her medical condition in the October issue of her magazine, O, elaborating that she had both kinds of thyroid disease -- an overactive thyroid and then an underactive one, both considered autoimmune diseases.
NEWS
By PAUL W. LADENSON and NEIL SOLOMON | May 12, 1991
It is an extraordinary coincidence that both President and Mrs. Bush have had overactive thyroid glands, a condition called hyperthyroidism that affects about one out of 100 Americans. They have the most common kind of hyperthyroidism, a condition called Graves' disease, named after the Irish doctor who described it more than a century ago.In this disease, the body's immune system turns against the thyroid gland, inflames it and causes it to produce too much thyroid hormone. These hormones are chemicals that travel in blood throughout the body to regulate our metabolism and the performance of many organs, including the heart.
FEATURES
By Marian Uhlman and Marian Uhlman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 11, 1998
Another screening test has been added to the recommended list for women over 50: one to check whether the thyroid gland is working properly.The newly merged American College of Physicians and American Society of Internal Medicine recently developed the new screening guidelines. The thyroid gland produces hormones that help control metabolism. Too little hormone can make people appear sluggish, depressed and forgetful. They can feel chilly and gain weight. Too much hormone can make them nervous, heat-intolerant and prone to weight loss.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,BOSTON GLOBE | June 25, 1996
Three years ago, Ruth Hertz, 66, a self-described little old lady, began feeling lousy. An avid tennis player, she found herself dragging around the court. "The tiredness sort of seemed to come on suddenly," she recalled last week.In fact, Hertz was "more than tired. I was lethargic. I was doing a lot of sleeping," she says, "and I was beginning to be a little depressed."She finally confided her growing list of symptoms to another woman in her water aerobics class who immediately -- and correctly -- diagnosed her problem: an underactive thyroid gland.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | March 9, 1993
Q: My doctor has recommended treatment with radioactive iodine for an overactive thyroid gland. The thought of radioactivity scares me. I am only 35 and am especially afraid that the treatment may affect my ovaries and result in damage to my children if I should get pregnant again. Another concern is an increased risk of cancer. It would help me to know about the safety of radioactive iodine.A: Radioactive iodine is the safest and most economical way to treat the common causes of an overactive thyroid (thyrotoxicosis)
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | October 26, 1993
Q: After she found a lump in my thyroid gland, my internist sent me to an endocrinologist, who put a needle into the lump and told me that surgery was not necessary because the lump was not cancerous. I am still concerned about the possibility of thyroid cancer and would like to know more about the reliability of the procedure that was performed.A: The procedure performed by your endocrinologist, called a fine needle aspiration, is now the most common technique used to diagnose the cause of lumps in the thyroid gland.
FEATURES
By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Gail Devers, three-time Olympic gold medalist and "the Fastest Woman in the World," has a story she wants everyone to know.The year she turned 21, she had just set two American track and field records. But later that year, she became barely able to walk across the room without being winded.She noticed the pigmentation in her skin was fading in spots; then, she says, "My hair started to fall out in clumps, my nails became brittle and layers of my skin were just peeling off. At 21, that's not what you want to look at in the mirror every day."
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2004
I noticed your comment on grapefruit juice raising blood levels of some medications. This is true, but as a medical doctor, I purposely use it to increase absorption of an expensive drug. Grapefruit does not actually improve absorption of medications. It does, however, interfere with the breakdown (metabolism) of dozens of drugs. In effect, that raises blood levels and increases the impact the drug has on the body. Your strategy does require careful monitoring. The grapefruit effect is highly variable.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Tipper Gore underwent surgery yesterday afternoon at Johns Hopkins Hospital to remove a nodule from her thyroid gland, which doctors will test for cancer. They'll know the results in about a week.Earlier tests on the lump had been inconclusive, so physicians recommended that Gore have the surgery, according to statement released last night by Gore's spokeswoman, Camille Johnston."The only way to find out what this is is to have it removed and have it tested," Johnston said. She said Gore and her husband, Vice President Al Gore, planned to stay over at Hopkins last night.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff | December 12, 1999
Brenda Blackburn had been feeling more tired than she could ever remember. At first, the 50-year-old Harford County woman attributed the debilitating fatigue to her diabetes, but it only got worse. Finally she couldn't walk up and down stairs without weakness and exhaustion.Her physician, endocrinologist James Mersey, tested her thyroid, the gland responsible for regulating the body's metabolism, to determine how well it was functioning. The results surprised her: "He told me it was literally dead!"
FEATURES
By Marian Uhlman and Marian Uhlman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 11, 1998
Another screening test has been added to the recommended list for women over 50: one to check whether the thyroid gland is working properly.The newly merged American College of Physicians and American Society of Internal Medicine recently developed the new screening guidelines. The thyroid gland produces hormones that help control metabolism. Too little hormone can make people appear sluggish, depressed and forgetful. They can feel chilly and gain weight. Too much hormone can make them nervous, heat-intolerant and prone to weight loss.
FEATURES
By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Gail Devers, three-time Olympic gold medalist and "the Fastest Woman in the World," has a story she wants everyone to know.The year she turned 21, she had just set two American track and field records. But later that year, she became barely able to walk across the room without being winded.She noticed the pigmentation in her skin was fading in spots; then, she says, "My hair started to fall out in clumps, my nails became brittle and layers of my skin were just peeling off. At 21, that's not what you want to look at in the mirror every day."
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 1997
Let me start by saying that I love my husband dearly. He is wonderful in all respects except one -- he bites his fingernails.I have pleaded with him in vain to give up this childish behavior. It absolutely drives me crazy to watch him gnaw on his thumbnails. And when I look at those raggedy edges below the quick it makes me cringe.He tries to control himself, but this horrible habit seems to overwhelm him, especially when he is under stress. Is there something he can use to stop nail biting?
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | February 15, 1994
Q: When I saw my doctor about a swelling in the front of my neck, he told me that I have a goiter and ordered some blood tests. What is a goiter and how is it likely to affect me?A: Goiter is a general term for an enlargement of the thyroid gland. With an enlarged thyroid, production of thyroid hormone can be excessive (hyperthyroidism), reduced (hypothyroidism) or normal.Goiters are rarely due to thyroid cancers, but an occasional thyroid malignancy may cause generalized enlargement of the thyroid.
FEATURES
By Mary Beckman | October 4, 2007
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on Good Morning America that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks. Winfrey then wrote about her medical condition in the October issue of her magazine, O, elaborating that she had both kinds of thyroid disease -- an overactive thyroid and then an underactive one, both considered autoimmune diseases.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,BOSTON GLOBE | June 25, 1996
Three years ago, Ruth Hertz, 66, a self-described little old lady, began feeling lousy. An avid tennis player, she found herself dragging around the court. "The tiredness sort of seemed to come on suddenly," she recalled last week.In fact, Hertz was "more than tired. I was lethargic. I was doing a lot of sleeping," she says, "and I was beginning to be a little depressed."She finally confided her growing list of symptoms to another woman in her water aerobics class who immediately -- and correctly -- diagnosed her problem: an underactive thyroid gland.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | February 15, 1994
Q: When I saw my doctor about a swelling in the front of my neck, he told me that I have a goiter and ordered some blood tests. What is a goiter and how is it likely to affect me?A: Goiter is a general term for an enlargement of the thyroid gland. With an enlarged thyroid, production of thyroid hormone can be excessive (hyperthyroidism), reduced (hypothyroidism) or normal.Goiters are rarely due to thyroid cancers, but an occasional thyroid malignancy may cause generalized enlargement of the thyroid.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.