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Thyroid Disease

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By Marian Uhlman and Marian Uhlman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 11, 1998
Another screening test has been added to the recommended list for women over 50: one to check whether the thyroid gland is working properly.The newly merged American College of Physicians and American Society of Internal Medicine recently developed the new screening guidelines. The thyroid gland produces hormones that help control metabolism. Too little hormone can make people appear sluggish, depressed and forgetful. They can feel chilly and gain weight. Too much hormone can make them nervous, heat-intolerant and prone to weight loss.
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NEWS
October 19, 2009
Graves' disease is a disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the thyroid gland and causes it to make too much of the hormone thyroxine. Because the thyroid gland regulates the body's metabolism, weight, energy, mood and organ functions can be affected when there is a problem. Dr. Asha Thomas, an internal medicine specialist at Sinai Hospital with a sub-specialty in endocrinology and metabolism, writes about the condition. * Graves' disease can develop in anyone at any age, but it develops most often in women after the age of 20. A family history of thyroid disease is associated with increased incidence of Graves' disease.
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By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Gail Devers, three-time Olympic gold medalist and "the Fastest Woman in the World," has a story she wants everyone to know.The year she turned 21, she had just set two American track and field records. But later that year, she became barely able to walk across the room without being winded.She noticed the pigmentation in her skin was fading in spots; then, she says, "My hair started to fall out in clumps, my nails became brittle and layers of my skin were just peeling off. At 21, that's not what you want to look at in the mirror every day."
FEATURES
By Mary Beckman | October 4, 2007
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on Good Morning America that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks. Winfrey then wrote about her medical condition in the October issue of her magazine, O, elaborating that she had both kinds of thyroid disease -- an overactive thyroid and then an underactive one, both considered autoimmune diseases.
FEATURES
By Mary Beckman | October 4, 2007
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on Good Morning America that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks. Winfrey then wrote about her medical condition in the October issue of her magazine, O, elaborating that she had both kinds of thyroid disease -- an overactive thyroid and then an underactive one, both considered autoimmune diseases.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1998
Hoping to spare others the medical run-around she once endured, Kelly G. Ripken has established an education and referral program for people suffering from Graves' disease and other thyroid disorders.Ripken, the wife of Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr., will serve as co-director of a program at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Initial funding is a $250,000 donation from the Kelly & Cal Ripken Foundation.With this program, people can make a phone call to speak to someone who will find answers to questions about thyroid disorders.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
For much of the 20th century, the drugs used to treat diabetes and thyroid disease were extracted from animals - mostly cows and pigs. That started to change in the 1960s, when scientists began to mass produce synthetic thyroid hormone in the lab. The change accelerated in the 1980s, when insulin became the first synthetic drug manufactured through genetic engineering. But not everyone considers the shift to synthetics a sign of progress. Of the millions of people who rely on hormone therapies, several thousand still insist that traditional, animal-derived drugs work better and are safer than the newer synthetic versions.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | June 4, 1991
When Camille Marx was diagnosed with lupus four years ago, she had never heard of it. And she didn't have the faintest idea what an autoimmune disorder was.Now that autoimmune disorders have hit the White House, though, the condition is being discussed everywhere from scientific laboratories to radio talk shows.Lupus -- which First Dog Millie suffers from -- is an autoimmune disorder, as is Grave's disease, which has been diagnosed in both President and Barbara Bush. Both conditions are the result of the body's immune system mistaking a part of the body for a foreign invader and attacking it.For Ms. Marx, the current public interest is one more step in helping her deal with lupus, a disease that affects 1 of every 2,000 Americans, causing such symptoms as skin rashes, joint pain and swelling, sensitivity to sunlight and anemia.
NEWS
October 19, 2009
Graves' disease is a disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the thyroid gland and causes it to make too much of the hormone thyroxine. Because the thyroid gland regulates the body's metabolism, weight, energy, mood and organ functions can be affected when there is a problem. Dr. Asha Thomas, an internal medicine specialist at Sinai Hospital with a sub-specialty in endocrinology and metabolism, writes about the condition. * Graves' disease can develop in anyone at any age, but it develops most often in women after the age of 20. A family history of thyroid disease is associated with increased incidence of Graves' disease.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff | December 12, 1999
Brenda Blackburn had been feeling more tired than she could ever remember. At first, the 50-year-old Harford County woman attributed the debilitating fatigue to her diabetes, but it only got worse. Finally she couldn't walk up and down stairs without weakness and exhaustion.Her physician, endocrinologist James Mersey, tested her thyroid, the gland responsible for regulating the body's metabolism, to determine how well it was functioning. The results surprised her: "He told me it was literally dead!"
FEATURES
By Marla Cone | August 23, 2007
An epidemic of thyroid disease among pet cats could be caused by toxic flame retardants that are widely found in household dust and some pet food, government scientists reported last week. The often-lethal disease was rare in cats until the 1980s, when it began appearing widely. A the time, industry started using large volumes of brominated flame retardants in products, including furniture cushions, electronics, mattresses and carpet padding. Scientists from the Environmental Protection Agency noted a possible connection between hyperthyroidism and flame retardants.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
For much of the 20th century, the drugs used to treat diabetes and thyroid disease were extracted from animals - mostly cows and pigs. That started to change in the 1960s, when scientists began to mass produce synthetic thyroid hormone in the lab. The change accelerated in the 1980s, when insulin became the first synthetic drug manufactured through genetic engineering. But not everyone considers the shift to synthetics a sign of progress. Of the millions of people who rely on hormone therapies, several thousand still insist that traditional, animal-derived drugs work better and are safer than the newer synthetic versions.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff | December 12, 1999
Brenda Blackburn had been feeling more tired than she could ever remember. At first, the 50-year-old Harford County woman attributed the debilitating fatigue to her diabetes, but it only got worse. Finally she couldn't walk up and down stairs without weakness and exhaustion.Her physician, endocrinologist James Mersey, tested her thyroid, the gland responsible for regulating the body's metabolism, to determine how well it was functioning. The results surprised her: "He told me it was literally dead!"
FEATURES
By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Gail Devers, three-time Olympic gold medalist and "the Fastest Woman in the World," has a story she wants everyone to know.The year she turned 21, she had just set two American track and field records. But later that year, she became barely able to walk across the room without being winded.She noticed the pigmentation in her skin was fading in spots; then, she says, "My hair started to fall out in clumps, my nails became brittle and layers of my skin were just peeling off. At 21, that's not what you want to look at in the mirror every day."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1998
Hoping to spare others the medical run-around she once endured, Kelly G. Ripken has established an education and referral program for people suffering from Graves' disease and other thyroid disorders.Ripken, the wife of Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr., will serve as co-director of a program at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Initial funding is a $250,000 donation from the Kelly & Cal Ripken Foundation.With this program, people can make a phone call to speak to someone who will find answers to questions about thyroid disorders.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | June 4, 1991
When Camille Marx was diagnosed with lupus four years ago, she had never heard of it. And she didn't have the faintest idea what an autoimmune disorder was.Now that autoimmune disorders have hit the White House, though, the condition is being discussed everywhere from scientific laboratories to radio talk shows.Lupus -- which First Dog Millie suffers from -- is an autoimmune disorder, as is Grave's disease, which has been diagnosed in both President and Barbara Bush. Both conditions are the result of the body's immune system mistaking a part of the body for a foreign invader and attacking it.For Ms. Marx, the current public interest is one more step in helping her deal with lupus, a disease that affects 1 of every 2,000 Americans, causing such symptoms as skin rashes, joint pain and swelling, sensitivity to sunlight and anemia.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Doctors have ordered analyses of the water zTC supplies at the White House and other presidential and vice presidential residences to see whether they contain chemicals that may have triggered the thyroid disease afflicting both President Bush and his wife, Barbara.Presidential spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said yesterday that the White House had also asked a specialist to review the Bush family's medical history and to check for any link between the first couple's autoimmune ailment, Graves' disease, and another autoimmune disease, lupus, contracted by their dog, Millie.
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