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Thyroid Cancer

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By Newsday The New York Times also contributed to this story | September 3, 1992
A large and startling increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer, perhaps a legacy of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident, has been observed in Belarus children, according to scientists."
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Elizabeth Klein is used to the spotlight, but there was something the budding actress from Bethesda didn't want everyone to see. That was a telltale mark on her throat from thyroid surgery. "I don't want every character I play to have the same scar," said Klein, who had a thyroidectomy on Jan. 10. "It's a very obvious scar. " But Klein doesn't have a scar, at least not a visible one, anymore. Her doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital have recently begun offering a "facelift" style procedure that hides evidence of surgery behind her ear and under her hair.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Jonathan Bor and Gail Gibson and Jonathan Bor,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 26, 2004
The future face of the Supreme Court, a muted issue throughout the heated presidential race, gained urgency yesterday with the unexpected announcement that Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist has thyroid cancer and underwent surgery over the weekend in connection with the illness. Rehnquist, who at 80 is the second-oldest person to preside over the high court, was admitted Friday to the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, where doctors performed a tracheotomy Saturday, the court said in a brief statement.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2010
Thyroid disorders are not uncommon and can have a significant impact on people's lives. But often they are not diagnosed until a woman finds a lump or a family member notices changes. For a breakdown of the symptoms and treatments, we turn to Dr. William Valente, an endocrinologist with a focus on thyroid disorders at Mercy Medical Center. Question: What is the thyroid? Answer: A small gland at the base of the neck, just above the notch of the breast bone, the thyroid is about the size and shape of a butterfly.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - Amid intense speculation that he will step down in June, ailing Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist returned to the bench yesterday for the first time since he began treatments for thyroid cancer and appeared determined to pick up where he left off five months ago. Without fanfare or comment, Rehnquist took his center seat when public arguments opened at 10 a.m., then presided over the court for the next two hours, interjecting questions and,...
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Jonathan Bor and Gail Gibson and Jonathan Bor,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court met yesterday without Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, who revealed that he is undergoing chemotherapy and radiation treatments for his recently diagnosed thyroid cancer and called plans to return to work this week "too optimistic." The disclosure signaled that the court's 80-year-old leader probably is suffering from the least common and most deadly form of the disease, doctors said. It spurred speculation that Rehnquist's retirement could be imminent, all but ensuring that whoever wins today's presidential election could reshape the aging and closely divided court.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2004
Life is full of surprises, and Karen Ulmer got a well-deserved one this week when about 30 family members and colleagues ambushed her at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. There were hugs. There were flowers. There was - oh, no! - Ulmer's 5-year-old son, Joshua, prematurely poking his finger into a sheet cake decorated with pink-icing script that read "Congratulations Karen." The cause for celebration was hospital director Larry Merlis' announcement that Ulmer is one of 15 nurses nationwide who've been selected for outstanding service awards by apparel manufacturer Cherokee Uniforms.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 2004
EMMETT, Idaho - In the 1950s and early 1960s, at the height of the Cold War, people in this southeastern Idaho town thought what they occasionally saw dusting their fruit orchards and cow pastures was frost - only it was not cold to the touch, several longtime residents said. Others described it as a gray-white powder that seemed to come out of nowhere. The residents of this town of dairy and cattle farmers did not know it then, but half a century ago, northern winds blew radioactive fallout into southeastern Idaho when the federal government set off about 90 nuclear bombs at its Nevada test site near Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | November 26, 2004
I use disposable contacts that I change every day. Over the years, am I harming my eyes? Probably not, but you should have your eyes checked annually to make sure. There are all sorts of contact lenses on the market -- from rigid, gas-permeable lenses that are relatively stiff and that you change once a year, to soft, very flexible disposables that you change every day, every two weeks, once a month or once every three months. The Food and Drug Administration, which must approve contact lenses, believes all these devices are safe and effective if used according to manufacturers' instructions, a spokeswoman said.
NEWS
May 12, 2006
Oncology Injected mice cells cure tumors in others White blood cells from mice that are naturally immune to cancer cured tumors in other mice when injected and provided them with lifelong immunity to the disease, researchers reported this week. The finding indicates the existence of a biological pathway previously unsuspected in any species, and researchers are working to understand the genetic and immunological basis of the surprising phenomenon. Preliminary studies hint at the existence of a similar resistance in humans and researchers hope that harnessing the biological process could lead to a new approach to treating cancer.
FEATURES
August 9, 2007
Events Resources, Medicare facts and care options -- The Baltimore County Department of Aging is offering free discussions to help seniors find information about Medicare and other community health resources in area senior centers this month. 410-887-2594. Classes Type 2 diabetes -- Greater Baltimore Medical Center's Geckle Diabetes & Nutrition Center, 6569 N. Charles St., Physicians' Pavilion East, Suite 507, Towson / Days and times vary. Registration: 443-849-2036. Screenings Colorectal cancer -- Baltimore County Department of Health, 6401 York Road / Free colorectal cancer screenings for Baltimore County residents who meet income and age requirements.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | September 7, 2006
NEW YORK -- Death rates for most forms of cancer have continued to decline despite a surprising and inexplicable rise in the incidence of thyroid cancer in women, scientists reported yesterday. The report takes a decade-long look at cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. It was compiled by the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Cancer Society. Medical investigators report a 1.6 percent annual decline in cancer deaths for men from 1992 to 2003 and an 0.8 percent annual drop among women.
NEWS
May 12, 2006
Oncology Injected mice cells cure tumors in others White blood cells from mice that are naturally immune to cancer cured tumors in other mice when injected and provided them with lifelong immunity to the disease, researchers reported this week. The finding indicates the existence of a biological pathway previously unsuspected in any species, and researchers are working to understand the genetic and immunological basis of the surprising phenomenon. Preliminary studies hint at the existence of a similar resistance in humans and researchers hope that harnessing the biological process could lead to a new approach to treating cancer.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 14, 2005
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, ill with thyroid cancer and at the center of intense speculation that he will step down soon, was hospitalized late Tuesday with a fever, according to a brief Supreme Court statement yesterday that fueled fresh talk of an impending retirement. Rehnquist, who is 80 and has served 33 years on the Supreme Court, was taken by ambulance to the Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington and remained there yesterday "for observation and tests," the announcement from the court's press office said.
NEWS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist might be next. Or will he? Seemingly frail from his struggle with thyroid cancer, the chief justice defied expectations in the past week by not announcing his retirement. Instead, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor turned out to be the retiree who caused an explosion of Washington buzz. But Rehnquist is still considered a good candidate for retirement because of his poor health, possibly giving President Bush the rare opportunity of naming two Supreme Court justices at about the same time.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
For five years, Laurel resident Mary Kusnierz supported the fight against cancer, participating in the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life in honor of her mother, who died of breast and colon cancer. She said she had given money to the cancer society for a while before a friend suggested she attend the Relay for Life in Anne Arundel County in 2000. "I went, and I was hooked," she said. " ... Instead of just writing a check, you feel like you are accomplishing something." On Friday, she will participate in the Howard County Relay for the first time as a cancer survivor.
NEWS
October 28, 2004
NEWS THAT Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist has thyroid cancer has highlighted the important connection between presidential politics and the U.S. Supreme Court. While the court has been little more than an afterthought in a campaign dominated by terrorism, the war in Iraq and the economy, its lasting impact on important issues should reinforce for Americans on both sides of the ideological divide what's at stake in this election. The current court has not changed in a decade, allowing for one of the most stable periods in the court's history.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | June 18, 1991
Q: During a check-up last week, my doctor discovered a small lump in my thyroid gland. The possibility of thyroid cancer was suggested, and I made an appointment to see a specialist. What is the chance that a thyroid lump is cancerous and how is the diagnosis made?A: Thyroid lumps (nodules) are quite common. In adults they are present in about 6 percent of women and 2 percent of men; they are more frequent in elderly individuals. Approximately one thyroid nodule in 20 is malignant.A thyroid nodule is more likely to be malignant in men, in younger people, in those with a family history of thyroid cancer, and especially in people who had irradiation treatment to the head and neck during childhood or adolescence.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
For five years, Mary Kusnierz was involved with the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life in honor of her mother, who died of breast and colon cancer. On Friday, the Laurel resident will participate in the Howard County relay for the first time as a cancer survivor. "I'm still doing this walk for my mom, but now it's got a different meaning," said Kusnierz, 45, who successfully completed treatment for breast and thyroid cancer this year. Over 16 hours Friday night and Saturday morning, about 1,400 people will walk, jog or run around the track at Hammond High School to raise community awareness about cancer and to raise funds for the American Cancer Society.
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