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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2010
Thyroid disorders are not uncommon and can have a significant impact on people's lives. But often they are not diagnosed until a woman finds a lump or a family member notices changes. For a breakdown of the symptoms and treatments, we turn to Dr. William Valente, an endocrinologist with a focus on thyroid disorders at Mercy Medical Center. Question: What is the thyroid? Answer: A small gland at the base of the neck, just above the notch of the breast bone, the thyroid is about the size and shape of a butterfly.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Elizabeth Klein is used to the spotlight, but there was something the budding actress from Bethesda didn't want everyone to see. That was a telltale mark on her throat from thyroid surgery. "I don't want every character I play to have the same scar," said Klein, who had a thyroidectomy on Jan. 10. "It's a very obvious scar. " But Klein doesn't have a scar, at least not a visible one, anymore. Her doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital have recently begun offering a "facelift" style procedure that hides evidence of surgery behind her ear and under her hair.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | June 16, 2002
Q. I was always in good health until I hit menopause. Over the next few years, I gained weight, my blood pressure rose and so did my cholesterol. The blood pressure is under control on atenolol, but the cholesterol didn't drop with diet and exercise. My doctor wanted to prescribe a statin cholesterol drug, but I dreaded the side effects. By accident, I discovered that the psyllium hull powder I started taking for irritable bowel problems had really brought my cholesterol down. In two months the total cholesterol dropped from 220 to 180, and my LDL went from 160 to 102. I was thrilled.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Dr. William Allan Dear Jr., an internist and former head of the division of nuclear medicine at Mercy Medical Center who also was a practicing magician, died July 20 of heart disease at Union Memorial Hospital. The longtime Guilford resident was 80. "He was the father of nuclear medicine at Mercy," said Dr. Louis E. Grenzer, a Baltimore internist and cardiologist who had known Dr. Dear since they both were residents at Mercy. "In the early 1970s, when they were new, he was doing the first echocardiograms and ultrasounds at Mercy.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN; King Features Syndicate | September 3, 2000
Q. I think too many people are experimenting with a potentially dangerous food item -- soy. I myself have experienced some odd symptoms that doctors could not figure out. I finally determined that the problems appear after eating soy products. At the time of my worst symptoms, I was eating up to three pounds of tofu a week. (I loved it for breakfast, warmed with a little soy sauce, plus various recipes for dinner.) I thought I had thyroid problems causing weight gain, hair loss, depression, water retention in hands and feet and breast swelling.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 12, 1996
I recently developed Graves' disease and have been having problems with my eyes. They seem to "bulge," and are quite irritated and puffy. What causes these symptoms? Will they go away once my thyroid is treated? What can be done for my eyes?In Graves' disease, a common disorder, the thyroid gland enlarges and produces too much thyroid hormone, a condition called hyperthyroidism. With it comes anxiety and restlessness; palpitations; weight loss despite an increased appetite and food intake; excessive sweating and intolerance to heat; tremors of the fingers; fatigue and muscle weakness; and diarrhea or an increased number of bowel movements.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush bounded into the White House yesterday morning grinning broadly and flashing two fingers at reporters.Adding a little pumping motion with his arms, Mr. Bush made clear that his hand signal didn't mean victory or peace but a successful return to the jogging trail during which he completed his normal distance of two miles for the first time since developing heart and thyroid problems early last month."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | June 19, 1992
NEW ORLEANS -- Gail Devers crawled and cried.The soles of her feet were charred and covered with blood. They were so swollen she looked like she was wearing five pairs of athletic socks. They hurt so badly that she would hop from one foot to the other, until she finally fell to the floor, dragging herself across the hardwood from her bed to the bathroom, silver scales appearing on her knees, spreading to her arms and face.She had been an Olympian, a sprinter capable of soaring over hurdles.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- He'd just returned from a four-day jaunt to the Soviet Union during which he took advantage of the time difference to squeeze in four and a half days of activity. Less than two weeks earlier he was still in the midst of a nine-day mission to London, Greece and Turkey.His shoulders were slumped, and the president admitted to being tired when he returned to the White House after an emotional, 30-hour day Thursday.But Mr. Bush was back in the Oval Office by 7:15 a.m. Friday, off to Capitol Hill for a courtesy call at 9 a.m., holding forth at a press conference shortly after noon, and then in the air again for Camp David, where he met with advisers yesterday.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 12, 1998
Social calendarJuly 12: First Bea Gaddy Musicfest at Bohager's Bar & Grill, 515 S. Eden St., Fells Point. Sponsored by Bohager's and WMAR-TV. Features the music of more than two dozen bands. Benefits the fund set up to help the Baltimore activist with her medical expenses. Doors open at 4 p.m. $20. Free parking. Call 410-563-7220.July 24: A Monte Carlo Night to benefit the National Center o Institutions & Alternatives, a nonprofit organization that provides residential living for mentally challenged people.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2010
Thyroid disorders are not uncommon and can have a significant impact on people's lives. But often they are not diagnosed until a woman finds a lump or a family member notices changes. For a breakdown of the symptoms and treatments, we turn to Dr. William Valente, an endocrinologist with a focus on thyroid disorders at Mercy Medical Center. Question: What is the thyroid? Answer: A small gland at the base of the neck, just above the notch of the breast bone, the thyroid is about the size and shape of a butterfly.
FEATURES
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | December 13, 2007
I have just begun treatment for hypothyroidism, and for the first time in more than 20 years I feel like I am emerging from a fog. My mental clarity and concentration were terrible. Since starting on Synthroid, I feel like a new person. My question is about my daughter. She is 17 and has some of the same symptoms. Is she too young to have her thyroid tested? Thyroid problems can run in families, so it makes sense to have her thyroid function checked. Depression has many causes and is not always recognized as a symptom of insufficient thyroid hormone.
FEATURES
By Mary Beckman | October 4, 2007
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on Good Morning America that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks. Winfrey then wrote about her medical condition in the October issue of her magazine, O, elaborating that she had both kinds of thyroid disease -- an overactive thyroid and then an underactive one, both considered autoimmune diseases.
FEATURES
By Marla Cone | August 23, 2007
An epidemic of thyroid disease among pet cats could be caused by toxic flame retardants that are widely found in household dust and some pet food, government scientists reported last week. The often-lethal disease was rare in cats until the 1980s, when it began appearing widely. A the time, industry started using large volumes of brominated flame retardants in products, including furniture cushions, electronics, mattresses and carpet padding. Scientists from the Environmental Protection Agency noted a possible connection between hyperthyroidism and flame retardants.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | May 25, 2007
My 5-year-old granddaughter sucks her thumb. Is there something that tastes bitter or unpleasant I can buy to put on her thumb to remind her to not suck it? Most children give up on thumb-sucking before they are 5. The American Dental Association says that thumb-sucking does not cause problems until after this age. You might be more successful distracting her with activities that require two hands. If your granddaughter wants to stop sucking her thumb, painting something yucky on it may help remind her to stop.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
For much of the 20th century, the drugs used to treat diabetes and thyroid disease were extracted from animals - mostly cows and pigs. That started to change in the 1960s, when scientists began to mass produce synthetic thyroid hormone in the lab. The change accelerated in the 1980s, when insulin became the first synthetic drug manufactured through genetic engineering. But not everyone considers the shift to synthetics a sign of progress. Of the millions of people who rely on hormone therapies, several thousand still insist that traditional, animal-derived drugs work better and are safer than the newer synthetic versions.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 20, 2004
Are there any supplements or vitamins that speed up healing from bruising? I am a 38-year-old man, and I have recently started playing ice hockey again. Needless to say, bruises are a part of the game. Is there anything I can do in addition to icing the injury? I frequently take Advil before or after games to reduce inflammation in my shoulders. Does this help or hurt with respect to bruising? A number of plant derivatives have been applied to bruises to help them heal faster. Some readers are enthusiastic about castor oil, while both arnica and comfrey have a long folk tradition of use for bruises.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | May 25, 2007
My 5-year-old granddaughter sucks her thumb. Is there something that tastes bitter or unpleasant I can buy to put on her thumb to remind her to not suck it? Most children give up on thumb-sucking before they are 5. The American Dental Association says that thumb-sucking does not cause problems until after this age. You might be more successful distracting her with activities that require two hands. If your granddaughter wants to stop sucking her thumb, painting something yucky on it may help remind her to stop.
NEWS
December 30, 2005
Appointments Dalal J. Haldeman has been named vice president in charge of the newly named Office of Marketing and Corporate Communications at Johns Hopkins Medicine. She replaces Elaine K. Freeman, who is retiring after many years as vice president of corporate communications. For the past seven years, Haldeman has been director of marketing operations for the Cleveland Clinic Health System. She has also been vice president of Pediatric Medical Management Inc. and director of marketing and business development at Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital for Rehabilitation.
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