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NEWS
February 2, 2003
Jon McGovern, former executive chef of The Main Street Tower in Bel Air and The Crazy Swede in Havre de Grace, has joined Thyme for You LLC, a personal chef service in Baltimore area, which is expanding its business area to Harford County. McGovern began his cooking career in Long Island, N.Y. After training at the Culinary Institute of America in 1993 and 1994, he cooked extensively up and down the East Coast as well as in the Midwest. Thyme for You's owner is Beth Andresini. Her business will come into the home with fresh groceries, prepare meals, package them to the customer's specifications and clean up the kitchen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Local chefs share cool, creative uses for the kitchen staple. By Kit Waskom Pollard Eggs can do it all. Equally at home as breakfast on the go or as the centerpiece of an elegant dinner, it's no wonder that the simple ingredient holds a special place in chefs' hearts. Here, four local chefs share their favorite egg preparations, ranging from a simple crab omelet to delicate, sophisticated croquettes. Egg Yolk Croquettes with Bacon, Comté & Truffle Yields 6 servings In the Lord Baltimore Hotel's restaurant, The French Kitchen, Chef Jordan Miller experiments with high-tech toys, turning out dishes that combine ambition with great flavor - such as these carefully constructed croquettes in heady cheese-truffle-bacon sauce.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | December 22, 2002
When I was in Europe last month, I caught a cold and developed an awful cough. Luckily, a German pharmacist understood my sign language and sold me a miracle cure that cleared it up in a few days. The medicine is Makatussin, and it contains "Thymianfluid-extrakt" and "Sternanisol." It comes as drops to be put on a sugar cube or in tea. It worked so much better than my regular cough medicine that I would like to find something similar here. Is there a medicine like it? Makatussin contains extract of thyme and star anise oil. The German government has approved both herbs for colds and coughs.
NEWS
By Amy Landsman Linker | January 2, 2013
Reaching way back in a kitchen cabinet, I grab a jar of what's billed as orange marmalade. It's really not marmalade, just sugar glop without any orange in it at all, masquerading as the real thing. It was a "bonus" in a crate of Florida citrus we got a while back. We ate the grapefruit and oranges ages ago, but at this point it's clear no one in our family is ever going to touch that alleged marmalade. I toss it. I've been reading recently about how much food is wasted by the average American family.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 14, 1998
HERBS AND HISTORY come together at the Friendly Thyme Herb Club's annual Herb Day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday in the rose garden of the Flag House Museum, 844 E. Pratt St. in Baltimore.The club moved the event to the Flag House this year because the previous location, the 1840 House, is part of the Baltimore City Life Museums, which have closed."Herb Day provides an excellent opportunity to further the club's purpose, which is to gain and share knowledge of herbs," said Sue Latini, who will cook dishes over the open fireplace in the museum from her cookbook, "Hearth Cooking: Early American Recipes."
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 1, 2000
FRIENDLY THYME Herb Club's first Herbal Symposium, held last weekend at St. John Lutheran Church, was a resounding success. Under the chairmanship of member Sue Latini, the symposium proved to be one of the club's most energetic endeavors - a delightful day of learning, fun and camaraderie. The mood was set for herbal learning and enjoyment from the moment of entering the building, with a tastefully decorated welcoming table featuring garden statuary, ivy topiary and fresh flowers. Greeters gave each person an elegantly decorated bag filled with herbal information and goodies, and speakers shared their knowledge about the wide use of herbs.
NEWS
By Rosalie M. Falter | August 11, 1992
It was "Thyme For Tea" at the Ferndale-Linthicum Senior Center on Friday as Friendly Thyme Herb Club members turned the building into a lovely English country inn.The Bereavement Center of Hospice of the Chesapeake is offering a free support group for adults grieving the suicide death of a loved one.The group meets on the second and fourth Monday of every month from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at hospice office, 403 Headquarters Drive, Suite 1, Millersville.The...
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 1996
A HOT CUP OF TEA is soothing refreshment on a damp, cold day. And, getting together with friends for a tea party is one way to ease through the winter doldrums.A tea party by the Friendly Thyme Herb Club will follow the group's 10 a.m. meeting Friday.Members who mix their own blend of tea, herbal or otherwise, will share recipes and discuss whether their blend is made for its taste or for medicinal reasons.Members are reminded to bring their china teapot, cup and saucer, and any books on tea they would like to share.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | April 20, 2003
After my first attempt at boeuf bourguignon in high school, I complained to my French teacher that something was missing. His advice was concise: "Add thyme." I tried again, this time, simmering the stew with a liberal dose of dried French thyme. What a difference! But it wasn't until I grew my own thyme that I learned how much that single herb enhances soups, stews, pates, vegetables and more. "Thyme is a good universal herb," says Rolfe Hagen, owner of the Thyme Garden Herb Co. in Alsea, Ore., which grew out of Hagen's gourmet restaurant there.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 1998
The thyme -- er -- time has come to reintroduce one of history's great herbs! For those who associate thyme only with cooking, it may come as a surprise to find that this plant has a long and glorious history, much of it unrelated to gustatory pleasures.The several different kinds of thyme fall into two major categories: Thymus vulgaris, the common thyme used in cooking, which most of us are familiar with, and the other thymes, including T. praecox, which is also called creeping thyme, wild thyme or mother-of-thyme.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
Radishes are lucky to be at any American table. Used in salads as filler and crudités plates for color they are always the last to be eaten (if they're eaten at all). It's understandable, though, because the varieties we buy from the supermarket are extremely bitter and rather unpleasant by themselves. The varieties of radish at the farmers market are more varied, but even the milder English versions are peppery and conducive to eating by themselves. The way to bite back at these is to roast them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2012
For those of us who grew up in Baltimore, cantaloupe brings back memories of the a-rabs walking down the street with their horse-drawn carts bellowing in that wonderful sing-song cadence to come out for fruit. Going out with my mother to buy fruit (and to water and pet the horse) was always a treat, especially knowing that we'd come home with a cantaloupe. My mother liked it plain with a little salt "to bring out the sweetness," and it was my introduction to the beautiful interplay between sweet and savory.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
This spring, if you compare your food and drink menus, you might see a few striking similarities. Move over, mint. As the weather gets warmer, basil, dill, thyme and lavender — herbs once relegated to the kitchen — are popping up in mixed drinks at Baltimore bars and restaurants. Bartenders are taking chances by muddling basil and strawberries in a spiked lemonade, tossing dried thyme into martinis made with tomato-infused vodka and swapping the lime in gin and tonics for cucumber and dill.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | November 25, 2007
This chowder does not take long to prepare (count on about 20 minutes for prepping and 30 for cooking) and calls for ingredients you are likely to have on hand if you prepared Thanksgiving dinner. A recipe serves 6, but can easily be doubled. I plan to serve this rich, delectable chowder with a salad and some warm bread for lunch or supper. Betty Rosbottom writes for Tribune Media Services. `AFTER THANKSGIVING' TURKEY, SWEET POTATO AND BACON CHOWDER Serves 6 5 slices lean smoked bacon 1 cup chopped onion 3/4 cup chopped celery 2 cups cubed ( 1/2 -inch dice)
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | October 10, 2007
Olives and fennel are two common ingredients of the Mediterranean region. I love to combine them with fresh fish, and though we may not get the same species found in that sun-dappled area of the world, we have our choice of plenty from our own coasts. I find halibut works well with these simple flavors, but red snapper or even fresh-water trout can shine here. Team the dish with ripe tomatoes, tossed in a salad, and a lemon tart from the bakery. Carol Mighton Haddix is food editor of the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
FEATURES
By MARIAN HENGEMIHLE | July 21, 2007
Creeping Thyme (Thymus sp.) Searching for a low groundcover that deer don't eat? A sunny spot in your garden may be perfect for creeping thyme. This herbaceous perennial forms a mat about 3 to 5 inches tall by creeping stems. Tiny glossy leaves range from green to gold to variegated, depending upon species and cultivar. Midsummer flowers of pink, lavender, red or white attract bees to their rich nectar. Creeping thyme requires excellent drainage, but, once established, this drought-tolerant groundcover makes a scented carpet underfoot.
FEATURES
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1997
Homemaker Shirley Ponemone loves cooking for a crowd. That will be proved again Saturday when she fires up her gas grill and camp stove for cooking demonstrations at the Baltimore Herb Festival in West Baltimore's Leakin Park.Free samples of Shirley's herb-scented foods are a key attraction of the daylong festival, which each year features a different herb. Versatile thyme is the star this year.Ponemone's lips are sealed as to what's on Saturday's menu: "It's always a secret. We want our recipes to be a total surprise."
FEATURES
June 9, 2007
Tip -- Wine pairing -- Sauvignon blanc is a fine partner for food cooked with herbs, such as fish with dill or chicken with sage or thyme. -- thejoykitchen.com
FEATURES
June 9, 2007
Tip -- Wine pairing -- Sauvignon blanc is a fine partner for food cooked with herbs, such as fish with dill or chicken with sage or thyme. -- thejoykitchen.com
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