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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 29, 2008
William B. Thurmond Sr., a retired American Can Co. executive, died of a heart attack April 22 at Memorial Hospital in Easton. The McDaniel resident was 81. Mr. Thurmond was born and raised in Faber, Va., and graduated in 1943 from E.C. Glass High School in Lynchburg, Va. Mr. Thurmond tried to enlist in the service three times during World War II but was turned down because of bone disease, family members said. In 1943, he came to Baltimore and went to work in the shipping department of American Can Co. "Through determination and hard work, he was transferred to numerous manufacturing facilities in the Northeast, Midwest and South," said a daughter, Lori Ann White of Centennial, Colo.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 29, 2008
William B. Thurmond Sr., a retired American Can Co. executive, died of a heart attack April 22 at Memorial Hospital in Easton. The McDaniel resident was 81. Mr. Thurmond was born and raised in Faber, Va., and graduated in 1943 from E.C. Glass High School in Lynchburg, Va. Mr. Thurmond tried to enlist in the service three times during World War II but was turned down because of bone disease, family members said. In 1943, he came to Baltimore and went to work in the shipping department of American Can Co. "Through determination and hard work, he was transferred to numerous manufacturing facilities in the Northeast, Midwest and South," said a daughter, Lori Ann White of Centennial, Colo.
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NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - Senate Republican leader Trent Lott, under mounting pressure from opponents to relinquish his leadership position, apologized again yesterday for recent comments praising the 1948 pro-segregation presidential candidacy of Sen. Strom Thurmond. Lott told a conservative talk-show host that his words, which have been widely denounced as racially offensive, were "poorly chosen and insensitive." With civil rights groups, prominent Democrats and black political leaders clamoring for Lott to forgo the post of Senate majority leader, which he is to assume next month, the Mississippi senator tried to defuse the uproar over remarks he made at Thurmond's 100th birthday party.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 26, 2007
Lynne Cheney recently sparked a big laugh at a National Press Club luncheon with her remarks about the criticism her husband, Vice President Dick Cheney, has taken from Sen. Barack Obama. "Now, I have told Barack," she said, "he really does need to keep these disputes in the family." Rim shot. Laughter. Applause. Mrs. Cheney was referring to her discovery, while researching her newly released memoir, that the Illinois Democrat is a distant cousin to her Republican husband. "I just thought it was such an amazing American story," she said, "that one ancestor could be responsible down the family line for lives that have taken such different and varied paths."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - After a lifetime of public silence, a 78-year-old Los Angeles woman is stepping forward to say she is the daughter of the late Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina and a black woman who once worked as the Thurmond family maid. The woman, Essie Mae Washington-Williams, a retired vocational school teacher, says she has incontrovertible evidence, including personal notes and financial receipts and cashier's checks demonstrating his support for her - showing that Thurmond, once one of the nation's leading segregationists, was her father.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, was chosen yesterday to lead the Congressional Black Caucus and immediately criticized Senate Republican Leader Trent Lott for hailing the 1948 presidential bid of retiring Sen. Strom Thurmond. Thurmond, a South Carolina Republican, ran for president on a "Dixiecrat" ticket that opposed "social intermingling of the races." Cummings called Lott's remarks, made at a 100th birthday party for Thurmond, "extremely upsetting" and vowed that "action will be taken" by the caucus.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In an unprecedented concession to age, 94-year-old Strom Thurmond declared yesterday that he won't seek re-election in 2002 as South Carolina's oh-so-senior senator."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - The roll was still being called on a late afternoon vote last week when 98-year-old Sen. Strom Thurmond, who had arrived early as usual, decided to take his leave from the Senate chamber. With two aides bracing each arm, the South Carolina Republican painstakingly shuffled the few steps from his desk near the well of the chamber to where his wheelchair was waiting in the private lobby outside. Sen. Jesse Helms, an 80-year-old North Carolina Republican who parks his motorized scooter nearby, had rolled out a few minutes earlier.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 8, 2001
WASHINGTON - In the midst of a routine task he's performed hundreds, maybe thousands, of times before, Strom Thurmond recently made a mistake in the order of the ceremonial opening of the Senate. He began the daily proceedings not with the customary prayer but with the Pledge of Allegiance. Normally, this might be a matter of importance only to the chaplain, who gave the Senate's Republican president pro tem a gentle nudge to get him back on track. At 98, Thurmond has for years been acknowledged to be a shrunken, shuffling shadow of his robust former self.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | April 3, 1991
Washington.-- They buried Lee Atwater the other day in South Carolina, and all the Republicans who came to the funeral said nice things about him. By the time he died, after apologizing for some of the nasty things he had done to Democrats, even some of them were willing to say nice things about him.What remains unseen is whether any of the politicians who benefited from Mr. Atwater's campaign tactics intend to change their ways after reading and reflecting on...
NEWS
July 8, 2007
On June 30, 2007, LYNETTE JANCE; Friends may call at the CHATMAN- HARRIS FUNERAL HOME EAST, 4210 Belair Road. Monday, 1- 8 P.M. The Funeral Service will be Tuesday, 10 A.M. at the Faith Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1900 E. North Avenue. Interment Crownsville Veterans Cemetery.
NEWS
By JILL ZUCKMAN and JILL ZUCKMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As the Senate struggled recently to resolve an impasse over immigration reform, Sen. John Cornyn needed advice from an expert. He did not turn to President Bush nor to Majority Leader Bill Frist. "I said, `Trent, how do we get out of this mess?'" said Cornyn, a Texas Republican, referring to Sen. Trent Lott, the former Senate Republican leader from Mississippi whose knack for legislative strategy remains undiminished, if newly appreciated. Lott was forced from his leadership post in 2002 after he praised then-Sen.
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | December 22, 2003
THE SKELETON that rattled in the late South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond's closet when Essie Mae Washington-Williams revealed that she's his daughter also rattled for me. My two granddaughters are her great-granddaughters. That means that they are Mr. Thurmond's great-great-granddaughters. This was not really news to me. At family functions, Mr. Thurmond's relationship with Ms. Washington-Williams was the subject of much gossip and speculation. That's always where it ended, since she would not utter a word one way or another on the subject.
NEWS
December 18, 2003
A PUBLIC man, a private heart, a Southern secret, a daughter's duty: In setting straight the record of her birthright, a retired Los Angeles schoolteacher yesterday confirmed the power of decency to trump a scandal. "I am Essie Mae Washington-Williams, and at last I feel completely free," announced the mixed-race and out-of-wedlock daughter of the late Sen. Strom Thurmond. With that, she spared her four children, 13 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren the lifetime burden to which she'd been a conspirator: She endured almost eight decades of rumor, whispers, innuendo.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 18, 2003
COLUMBIA, S.C. - The daughter of a one-time segregationist senator - born to his 16-year-old African-American maid when he was 22 - claimed her place among his children and in the nation's troubled history of race yesterday. Essie Mae Washington-Williams, 78, said she decided to speak about being the daughter of Sen. Strom Thurmond, who died this year at age 100, not out of bitterness but to help her children understand their past. "In fact, there is a great sense of peace that has come over me in the past year," she said at a news conference.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - After a lifetime of public silence, a 78-year-old Los Angeles woman is stepping forward to say she is the daughter of the late Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina and a black woman who once worked as the Thurmond family maid. The woman, Essie Mae Washington-Williams, a retired vocational school teacher, says she has incontrovertible evidence, including personal notes and financial receipts and cashier's checks demonstrating his support for her - showing that Thurmond, once one of the nation's leading segregationists, was her father.
FEATURES
By Theo Lippmann, Jr. and Theo Lippmann, Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 1998
"Ol' Strom," by Jack Bass and Marilyn W. Thompson. Longstreet. 359 pages. $24. South Carolina's Strom Thurmond has been a U.S. senator for more than 43 years, longer than anyone else in history. But if you want to see his monument, don't look around the Senate or in the U.S. Code. He twice has been voted the "least effective" senator. That was long before old age overcame him in the 1990s.In 1986, he was more or less a spectator as the Armed Services Committee revamped the nation's military establishment, even though he was the senior Republican on the committee.
NEWS
By Earl Ofari Hutchinson | December 22, 2003
THE SKELETON that rattled in the late South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond's closet when Essie Mae Washington-Williams revealed that she's his daughter also rattled for me. My two granddaughters are her great-granddaughters. That means that they are Mr. Thurmond's great-great-granddaughters. This was not really news to me. At family functions, Mr. Thurmond's relationship with Ms. Washington-Williams was the subject of much gossip and speculation. That's always where it ended, since she would not utter a word one way or another on the subject.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - Former Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, a one-time Democratic segregationist who helped fuel the rise of the modern conservative Republican Party in the South, died last night, his family announced. He was 100 and had been the longest-serving senator in history. Mr. Thurmond, whose physical and political endurance were legendary - he holds the record for solo Senate filibustering - retired on Jan. 5 after more than 48 years in office. Last night in the U.S. Senate, lawmakers working feverishly on proposed Medicare expansion stopped their work for a moment of silence in Mr. Thurmond's honor.
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