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By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
Years before anyone chanted "Black Power!" or armed Black Panthers struck aggressive poses on the evening news, a small-town NAACP leader in North Carolina named Robert F. Williams said it was time for black Americans to "meet violence with violence."It was 1959. Eisenhower and Khrushchev waged the Cold War. A black man was lynched in Mississippi. Black leaders normally kept any thoughts of armed resistance to themselves.Williams was a burly, goateed former Marine who wrote poetry. The day after he made his fiery declaration to reporters on the steps of the Monroe, N.C., courthouse, word came down from NAACP headquarters: Williams was suspended.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
As a long-haired teen growing up in the 1960s, Jim McCullough had little clue what he wanted to do with his life, but two things did stir him: He hated the way some people in Laurel, his hometown, looked down on his African-American friends, and he loved using the wood lathe in shop class. He has traded the hippie locks for a grandfather's trim goatee. He long ago gained renown in the region as a master furniture craftsman, at times for his work on pieces used by government officials from presidents to attorneys general.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Three Thurgood Marshalls played bit parts in a small family drama at the Supreme Court yesterday.Grandfather Thurgood Marshall, a justice on the court since 1970 -- its first and only black member -- removed his robe, came down from the bench, and walked to the lawyer's lectern, occasionally leaning on a cane. He will be 83 next Tuesday.Addressing his colleagues in a brief but forceful way, the justice asked them to allow a lawyer to join the court's bar and practice there: his son, Thurgood Marshall Jr. At the same time, he asked that his daughter-in-law, Colleen P. Mahoney, Thurgood's wife, be admitted.
NEWS
By Michael Higginbotham | January 23, 2013
Thursday marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Baltimore-born Thurgood Marshall, the civil rights lawyer and first black Supreme Court justice who was instrumental in ending Jim Crow segregation. His representation of schoolgirl Linda Brown resulted in the landmark 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education, which ended separation practiced in a wide variety of public facilities and institutions. Yet Marshall sought more than just desegregation. Explaining his vision, Marshall proclaimed that "a child born to a black mother in a state like Mississippi … has exactly the same rights as a white baby born to the wealthiest person in the United States.
FEATURES
January 24, 2006
Jan. 24 1848: James W. Marshall discovered a gold nugget at Sutter's Mill in northern California, a discovery that led to the gold rush of '49. 1908: The first Boy Scout troop was organized in England by Robert Baden-Powell. 1993: Retired Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall died in Bethesda at age 84.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | May 11, 2008
New York -- From a second-floor classroom in the Baltimore school called Colored High, a teenage Thurgood Marshall watched white officers beat up black prisoners. But that's also the place where the budding civil rights activist first memorized the U.S. Constitution. It was on a Baltimore trolley car that the youth was called a racial slur, took a swing at the white man who had insulted him, and was arrested. On stage Thurgood, through July 20 at the Booth Theatre, 222 W. 45th St., New York.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- She stepped slowly but heartily up the stairs, up through the cold shadows of white marble columns, past the huge bronze doors and into the Great Hall of the Supreme Court. There the coffered ceiling towered above her and Evelyn Edwards seemed, like everyone else, a little lost in the mighty splendor of the place.But now Mrs. Edwards walked toward the flag-draped casket of Thurgood Marshall and, just then, she remembered a schoolhouse.She remembered a poor little place -- "Nothing you ever heard of, not even on the map" -- called Charlotte Court House, Va. Years ago, Evelyn Edwards attended the school, and the school, of course, was full of black children -- only black children.
NEWS
By Terry Eastland | July 1, 1991
JUSTICE Thurgood Marshall will be lucky to rank somewhere in the middle of the 105 Supreme Court justices who have served the United States. He wrote few opinions of major significance, either for the Supreme Court or in dissent. He was not an intellectual force. Of course, he did vote, and during his 24 years on the court, his, a liberal vote, was always the most predictable one.Marshall worked well with Justice William J. Brennan Jr.; the two voted together 94 percent of the time during the 1980s, the highest degree of congruence of any two justices.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | January 19, 2006
A gust of wind sent the top of a large tree crashing onto the windshield of a car traveling yesterday on the Beltway in Baltimore County, state police said. The accident occurred about 1 p.m. on the inner loop near the Greenspring Avenue exit. Two women in the car, ages 81 and 63, were treated for minor injuries at area hospitals and released, police said. "It landed right on that car and stopped it dead in its tracks," said Jeremiah Fowler, 29, who was driving his pickup nearby. The National Weather Service recorded a wind gust of 46 mph at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport just before the accident.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 19, 2007
Usually when I arrive at an airport, as so many holiday travelers will next week, my stomach is churning. I have anxiety about getting through security and making my flight. Most airlines have stopped serving real, complimentary meals in coach. My solution: Find some takeout fare at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport to soothe my stomach. Here is what I found, terminal by terminal, beyond security. Chesapeake Bay Roasting Co. Location --Terminal D Phone --410-859-1154 Hours --5 a.m.-8:30 p.m. daily This coffee shop offers pre-packaged sandwiches.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Forty-three years of letters, photographs, campaign buttons, itineraries and the occasional miniature flag are crammed into 2,000 fat binders lining three walls - floor to ceiling - of a storage room in the University of Maryland School of Law. They amount to a meticulous chronicle of Larry S. Gibson's professional life from 1965, when he was still a law student, to 2008, when he was active in a presidential election in Ghana. And that doesn't include 160 binders worth of material that's still in boxes, plus 200 more at Gibson's home and his law school office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
American television is generally awful when it comes to talking about race. Afraid of possibly offending anyone and absolutely terrified of tackling complex subject matter, most networks and major cable channels have come to largely avoid the topic in recent years — even during Black History Month. That timid TV backdrop is part of what makes HBO's "Thurgood," which debuts at 9 p.m. Thursday, such a special program. The film version of the one-man play starring Laurence Fishburne as Thurgood Marshall, the Baltimore-born civil rights attorney and the first black Supreme Court justice,l is one of the most frank, informed and searing discussions of race you will ever see on TV. But that exploration of African-American identity is only of several factors that distinguishes this production written and produced by 14-time Emmy-winner George Stevens Jr., of " Kennedy Center Honors" acclaim.
NEWS
By John Paul Rollert | July 12, 2010
The Elena Kagan hearings were a sleepy affair. With no 12th-hour revelations and a candidate who acquitted herself as cagey and well qualified, the solicitor general proved adept at the kabuki dance of the Supreme Court confirmation process. Yet there was one exception to the otherwise humdrum hearings: the bewildering decision by Republicans to taint Ms. Kagan by her association with Thurgood Marshall. Yes, that Thurgood Marshall — Baltimore native, hero of the civil rights movement, mastermind of Brown v. Board of Education, and the first African-American Supreme Court justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
In a cool bit of timing, "Thurgood," George Stevens Jr.'s vivid one-actor play about the first African American Supreme Court justice, is in Washington as senators are pondering the nomination of Thurgood Marshall's former law clerk, Elena Kagan, for a seat on the highest bench in the land. Add in all the talk onstage about interpreting the 14th Amendment and other civil rights cases, and the show exudes a remarkably contemporary feel (Rand Paul might pick up some useful perspectives from it)
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
The most direct road to old Baltimore next week might run through Washington. Actor Laurence Fishburne takes to the stage at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on Tuesday to perform the title role in "Thurgood," a one-actor play about the first African-American appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. And, as Fishburne embodies Thurgood Marshall delivering a lecture on his life at Howard University, audiences will also get a glimpse into the city where the future justice grew up. Theatergoers will meet Marshall's formidable grandmother, Annie, who launched possibly the first sit-down strike ever held in the city from her grocery store at the corner of Dolphin and Division streets.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2010
Republican National Chairman Michael Steele is calling Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan to account for her comments in support of Thurgood Marshall, the first black justice on the nation's highest court. Steele's statement is attracting plenty of attention from liberal bloggers, who never miss a chance to whack the Republican Party's first black chairman. Minutes after Obama announced his nomination, Steele said that Senate Republicans would raise "serious and tough questions" about Kagan's legal philosophy.
NEWS
April 13, 2005
THE ISSUE: RENAMING THE AIRPORT The General Assembly has passed a bill that would rename Baltimore-Washington International Airport in honor of Supreme Court justice and civil rights leader Thurgood Marshall, a Baltimore native who died in 1993. As a compromise, lawmakers agreed to add Marshall's name to the end of the airport's name and require Board of Public Works approval. Some worried that changing the airport's name would obscure the identity of Maryland's largest airport and hurt efforts to compete with Washington's two airports.
NEWS
April 11, 1991
Charles T. Burns' parents wanted him to become a lawyer. Instead, the Morgan graduate got into the numbers racket after seeing his first cousin, Thurgood Marshall, unable to find legal work.Yet when Mr. Burns opened his first grocery store in 1938 on Baltimore's Madison Avenue, he insisted, "In any business it is not a question of color, it is a question of giving people what they want, when they want it, accompanied by equal and better service."In 1970, Mr. Burns bought a bankrupt supermarket.
NEWS
By Stephanie Citron and Stephanie Citron,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2009
Annapolis is well-known for its historic vibe. The cobblestone streets, the well-kept Colonial homes, the maritime ties - they're just a few of the highlights that make the city, one of the earliest settlements of Colonists, a destination of choice for history buffs. Nevertheless, even some historians are largely unaware of the significant role that Maryland's capital city has played in the progression of African-American history. Annapolis was a prominent port for slave ships in the 18th century.
NEWS
By Andrew Kipkemboi and Andrew Kipkemboi,Sun reporter | June 19, 2008
A new city commission has been given the task of devising a plan to renovate and reuse P.S. 103, a historic West Baltimore elementary school attended by Thurgood Marshall and other African-Americans during the days of segregation. Built in 1877, P.S. 103 sits at 1315 Division St. and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Marshall attended P.S. 103 from 1914 to 1920, and it is there he first experienced the inequities of school segregation. From P.S. 103 he rose to become a legendary civil rights lawyer, acclaimed for his role in Brown v. Board of Education, the legal case that outlawed school segregation.
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