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Thrust Reversers

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By Seattle Times | August 25, 1991
SEATTLE -- The Federal Aviation Administration late Friday notified operators of 82 twin-engine Boeing 767s, powered by General Electric and Rolls-Royce engines, that they can resume using thrust reversers, which help slow jetliners after landing.Planes equipped with Pratt & Whitney engines, like those on the Lauda Air 767 that crashed May 26 in Thailand, must continue to keep their thrust reversers pinned closed while additional investigation and testing continue. Investigators are searching to find possible malfunctions that could cause the thrusters to deploy in flight.
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BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2004
About 340 manufacturing employees at Middle River Aircraft Systems are set to strike Thursday barring an agreement with management on a new four-year contract. Members of United Auto Workers Local 738 narrowly rejected the company's contract offer Oct. 30, starting a 10-day cooling-off period before employees could walk off the job. The vote was 135-132 against the proposed pact, which includes increases in health care costs and changes in disability benefits for injured and sick workers.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | January 30, 1993
A billion-dollar-plus contract that the people at Martin Marietta Corp.'s Middle River division thought they had in their back pocket has slipped away.Martin said yesterday that it was unable to reach a final agreement with Pratt & Whitney on a contract for jet engine thrust reversers that Martin had said earlier was to have "a positive and very big impact" on its Middle River operations.Pratt & Whitney wanted Martin "to take risks that we judged to be outside the limits of good business practice," Joseph D. Antinucci, president of Martin's Aero & Naval Systems division, said in a statement late yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
Two months after it unveiled a new line of jet-engine thrust reversers, uncertain whether anyone would ever buy one, Middle River Aircraft Systems has won an order with the precocious young airline JetBlue that could be worth as much as $120 million. JetBlue announced Tuesday that it will buy 100 regional jets from the Brazilian aircraft maker Embraer for roughly $3 billion, with an option to buy another 100 when delivery is completed in 2011. Middle River Aircraft Systems on Eastern Boulevard will build the thrust reversers -- the brakes, essentially -- for the twin-engine aircraft, as a subcontractor to the engines' manufacturer, General Electric Co. JetBlue's decision to buy a fleet of Embraer 190 aircraft with GE engines will shore up a business at Middle River Aircraft Systems that the company has struggled to maintain since the airline industry collapse that began in late 2001, company officials said.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | September 3, 1992
It didn't come easily, but the local Martin Marietta Corp. division has landed a $155 million General Electric contract to built thrust reversers for commercial jetliners.Yesterday's award came as the result of a major reorganization of the Aero & Naval Systems unit that was designed to boost the division's competitiveness and position the company for aircraft work in the years ahead by cutting production costs 25 percent.GE laid down the challenge back in June, Joseph D. Antinucci, president of the local division, said in an interview at his office.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1997
Beatles or Rolling Stones, Orioles or Yankees -- some choices are more passion than performance.The pending deal to change owners from Lockheed Martin to General Electric at the historic airplane parts plant in Middle River fits that mold: It may bruise feelings, but it isn't likely to harm much else.The Fairfield, Conn.-based GE is even bigger and richer than Lockheed Martin. What's more, it is making an extraordinary push into the same business areas that define the Middle River Aerostructures factory.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | January 8, 1995
Martin Marietta Corp. has taken a section of its sprawling Middle River complex and turned it into something similar to a one-stop shopping center where airlines from around the world can come for repair parts.The Commercial Customer Support Distribution Center, housed in a 50,000-square-foot warehouse not far from where an earlier generation of workers built the Titan II rockets that powered the Gemini astronauts into space in the 1960s, will stock all the parts needed to repair or overhaul the thrust reversers used on the General Electric Co.'s CF6 family of jet engines.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1996
Alcore Inc. advances as a Lockheed supplierAlcore Inc., an aerospace materials manufacturing company with plants in Jessup and Belcamp, has achieved most favored supplier status with Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Middle River plant.As a result, Lockheed Martin has awarded Alcore a three-year contract valued at $1 million for the construction of honeycomb aluminum sections to be used in the Pratt & Whitney thrust reversers built at Lockheed Martin.Thrust reversers act like brakes to slow jetliners once they have touched down on the runway.
NEWS
By HOUSTON CHRONICLE | November 4, 1999
NEWPORT, R.I. -- After a harrowing 40-second dive in which EgyptAir Flight 990 lost half its altitude, the jetliner climbed nearly 8,000 feet before plummeting again and breaking apart, radar data released last night indicated.Although National Transportation Safety Board officials refused to speculate about what happened on board the doomed airliner Sunday, the finding raised assumptions that its pilots managed to regain control of the aircraft before a final catastrophic crash into the Atlantic Ocean, killing 217 people.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1997
General Electric Co., which earlier this week announced plans to buy the Middle River thrust reverser plant from Lockheed Martin Corp., has an option to buy a similar business owned by Northrop Grumman Corp.Analysts said that if GE is signaling a serious push into the market, the once-desperate Middle River plant could be in for flush times.GE "has the money and they have the reputation for being fairly aggressive in completing their objectives," said Brett Lambert, an aerospace analyst with DFI International.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
The Air Force is expected to complete within several days a plan to lease 100 air-refueling tankers from Boeing Co., a $21 billion deal that would give the battered plane maker a critical infusion over the next decade as it struggles to overcome declines in the commercial aircraft market. And on Eastern Boulevard, where employees of Middle River Aircraft Systems are struggling with their own workload drought, the decision could reverberate throughout the factory. If Middle River is asked to build the planes' thrust reversers - a strong possibility, given its history - then the local plant's main production line will also get a multiyear boost, just when its future seems dire.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2002
Middle River Aircraft Systems has been selected to design and build the engine casings, thrust reversers and other components for a new Chinese commercial jet, work that is expected to bring as much as $750 million to the Baltimore-area plant over the next two decades. The contract could mean dozens of new jobs in Middle River, company officials said, but it also opens a lucrative new market for a plant whose industry - commercial aircraft construction - is foundering. "This is a tremendous strategic step for us," said Michael Chanatry, executive vice president and general manager of Middle River Aircraft Systems.
NEWS
By HOUSTON CHRONICLE | November 4, 1999
NEWPORT, R.I. -- After a harrowing 40-second dive in which EgyptAir Flight 990 lost half its altitude, the jetliner climbed nearly 8,000 feet before plummeting again and breaking apart, radar data released last night indicated.Although National Transportation Safety Board officials refused to speculate about what happened on board the doomed airliner Sunday, the finding raised assumptions that its pilots managed to regain control of the aircraft before a final catastrophic crash into the Atlantic Ocean, killing 217 people.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 2, 1999
A thrust-reverser malfunction that caused heavy damage to an EgyptAir jet two years ago could become relevant in the investigation into Sunday's crash of a sister plane off Nantucket, Mass.Although they have not ruled out other scenarios, authorities investigating the crash of EgyptAir Flight 990, a Boeing 767-300ER (extended-range) jetliner, will closely examine a scenario in which the inadvertent, in-flight deployment of an engine braking device used on landing, called a thrust reverser, flipped the jet into a sudden dive.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1997
Beatles or Rolling Stones, Orioles or Yankees -- some choices are more passion than performance.The pending deal to change owners from Lockheed Martin to General Electric at the historic airplane parts plant in Middle River fits that mold: It may bruise feelings, but it isn't likely to harm much else.The Fairfield, Conn.-based GE is even bigger and richer than Lockheed Martin. What's more, it is making an extraordinary push into the same business areas that define the Middle River Aerostructures factory.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1997
General Electric Co., which earlier this week announced plans to buy the Middle River thrust reverser plant from Lockheed Martin Corp., has an option to buy a similar business owned by Northrop Grumman Corp.Analysts said that if GE is signaling a serious push into the market, the once-desperate Middle River plant could be in for flush times.GE "has the money and they have the reputation for being fairly aggressive in completing their objectives," said Brett Lambert, an aerospace analyst with DFI International.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Martin Marietta Corp.'s Aero and Naval Systems Division in Middle River has been selected by Pratt & Whitney to build more than $1 billion worth of jet engine components, the head of the Baltimore County division told a state legislative committee yesterday.Joseph D. Antinucci, president of Martin's Middle River operation, said a contract still needs to be negotiated, but added: "They have selected us. There's no ambiguity about that."Mr. Antinucci was in Annapolis yesterday to testify at a hearing of the House Appropriations Committee on the state government's role in helping Maryland defense contractors adjust to a peacetime economy.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | December 16, 1993
Martin Marietta Corp. is scheduled today to announce an aerospace contract that is expected to secure the future of its Middle River complex and the jobs of its 1,400 employees.The company said yesterday that Norman R. Augustine, chairman and chief executive of Bethesda-based Martin Marietta, along with Gov. William Donald Schaefer and other federal, state and county officials, would make "a major program announcement" at the Baltimore County complex this morning, although it declined to disclose details.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1997
Spring may seem a long way off, but life is stirring at Lockheed Martin Corp.'s historic aircraft facility in Middle River.The sometimes beleaguered factory has struck a pair of significant business deals this month and opened a metal-working shop in Florida."
BUSINESS
March 21, 1996
Alcore Inc. advances as a Lockheed supplierAlcore Inc., an aerospace materials manufacturing company with plants in Jessup and Belcamp, has achieved most favored supplier status with Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Middle River plant.As a result, Lockheed Martin has awarded Alcore a three-year contract valued at $1 million for the construction of honeycomb aluminum sections to be used in the Pratt & Whitney thrust reversers built at Lockheed Martin.Thrust reversers act like brakes to slow jetliners once they have touched down on the runway.
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