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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Even in our LED age, there is still something deliciously spooky about the sight of gas jets getting fainter, for no apparent reason, inside the glass lamps of a lush Victorian parlor. It's the unforgettable visual motif many a movie fan will always associate with “Gaslight,” the 1944 hit that won Ingrid Bergman an Academy Award as a pitiful wife being slowly driven insane by her husband - mysterious dimming had a lot to do with it. The inspiration for that film, Patrick Hamilton's sturdy little thriller “Angel Street,” doesn't enjoy quite as much fame these days, which makes the play's handsome revival by the Olney Theatre Center all the more welcome.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
It was the eeriness of the situation that struck Baltimore writer Dan Fesperman. Drone pilots for the Air Force would spend weeks watching what amounted to a real-life silent movie of a small town thousands of miles away - all the while plotting the destruction of some of the inhabitants. Fesperman interviewed drone operators stationed at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada while doing research for his ninth thriller, "Unmanned," which is being released Wednesday. Most drone operators, he found, are former elite fighter pilots.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
The Baltimore-born author Justin Kramon's supporting characters are so quirky and funny, you'd swear they were drawn from real life. There's the landfill operator who shows a visitor a photograph of a hatchet-faced woman in her 60s and then complains that no one understands the burden of having a pretty wife. And there's the big-bellied, bearded lodge owner who's secretly addicted to online shopping. But the 33-year-old Kramon, who will read Tuesday at the Ivy Bookshop from his second novel, "The Preservationist," swears that he invented every oddball character.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
One by one, the sacred cows hit the ground, adroitly tipped over by the best-selling author Steve Berry in his 13th historical novel, "The Lincoln Myth. " Berry, 59, is a Florida-based former attorney and county commissioner turned author whose previous 12 books have sold more than 17 million copies in 51 countries. The sales are a tribute to the author's skill at folding his research into little-known historical puzzles inside murder mysteries starring Cotton Malone, a retired U.S. Justice Department operative turned book-seller.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 28, 2002
This is the last weekend to see the Vagabond Players' take on Stephen Mallatratt's thriller The Woman in Black. Adapted from Susan Hill's novel of the same name, the play takes place in a Victorian theater, where a British lawyer hires an actor to help him tell -- and, he hopes, lay to rest -- the story of a terrifying and tragic event from his past. Mary Bova directs the production. Tom Blair plays the lawyer, and Tony Colavito is the actor. Show times at the Vagabonds, 806 S. Broadway, are 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
By George Grella | February 7, 1993
POINT OF IMPACT.Stephen Hunter.Bantam.` 451 pages. $24.95.Strange as it may seem, not every heart was gladdened by the remarkable international events of the past few years, including the destruction of the Berlin Wall, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War.Besides certain members of the military services, right-wing columnists and that bloated welfare system known as the defense industry, those novelists who specialize in the twin...
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | October 4, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Jennifer Jason Leigh plays the girlfriend of Billy Baldwin, and Scott Glenn plays a veteran fireman in "Backdraft," Imagine Films' thriller about an arson investigation in Chicago, which also stars Kurt Russell. Ron Howard will direct and Richard B. Lewis will produce Greg Widen's screenplay. Filming on the Universal release began in the Windy City during the summer.Donald Sutherland will star opposite Emma Thompson and Kenneth Branagh in Paramount's "Dead Again," which Branagh will also direct.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 15, 1991
$TC HOLLYWOOD -- Artist David Salle -- a post-modernist who rose to prominence with his figure portraits in the early 1980s -- may be making his directorial debut with an erotic thriller for producer Robert De Niro.Casting materials for "Nothing Compares to You" call for "extreme nudity" from actresses who consider themselves "sexually adventurous."Told from a woman's point of view, the story is about a wife who goes off for a weekend on her own after learning of her husband's affair. When a burglar shows up in her hotel room, she embarks on a sexual quest.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 5, 2007
A whacked-out serial killer, obsessed with the number three and telephone terrorism. A seminary student who may be his next victim. A deranged aunt who layers on her makeup with a trowel. Riddles that, if answered properly, might keep death at bay. Phone Booth. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? Se7en. Saw. Most of the fun to be had with Thr3e is to spot the movies from which it cribs. Beyond that, what one has is a conventional psychological thriller that cheats too often and depends on actors determined to play only one note.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 2003
NEW YORK - This may not be the biggest bit of fallout from Michael Jackson's arrest on child molesting charges, but when one high school band struts in front of the cameras during Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade next week, the trombonists, sousaphonists and mellophonists will not play the piece they rehearsed for months. That would be Jackson's 1983 hit "Thriller." Instead, in a late scramble to keep everyone happy in Herald Square on Thursday, the marching band from Bloomington High School North in Bloomington, Ind., will strike up "R.O.
SPORTS
By Paul Tierney, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Before Towson's Senior Night matchup with William and Mary on Saturday at SECU Arena, Tigers coach Pat Skerry nearly came to tears while addressing his four seniors, who helped the program rebuild itself after a 1-31 record two seasons ago. It didn't matter for Towson that, on paper, the game was meaningless. As Jerrelle Benimon and the rest of the Tigers senior class walked to center court for senior ceremonies, Delaware was putting the finishing touches on its victory over the College of Charleston, locking Towson into the No. 2 seed in the Colonial Athletic Association tournament, which begins March 7, and stripping them of a chance at an automatic berth to the National Invitation Tournament.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
The Baltimore-born author Justin Kramon's supporting characters are so quirky and funny, you'd swear they were drawn from real life. There's the landfill operator who shows a visitor a photograph of a hatchet-faced woman in her 60s and then complains that no one understands the burden of having a pretty wife. And there's the big-bellied, bearded lodge owner who's secretly addicted to online shopping. But the 33-year-old Kramon, who will read Tuesday at the Ivy Bookshop from his second novel, "The Preservationist," swears that he invented every oddball character.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, whose death was announced today , almost single-handedly created the techno-thriller genre and some of his books, including "The Hunt for Red October," have become classics. The Baltimore author introduced complex military terms to millions of readers, in hefty books that ran hundreds of pages. But he never got lost in the alphabet soup of Pentagon and Kremlin acronyms. He created compelling characters such as Jack Ryan, who was played by Harrison Ford in movies such as "Clear and Present Danger" and "Patriot Games.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy, the prolific Baltimore-born author whose novels "The Hunt for Red October" and "Patriot Games" inspired blockbuster movies and action-packed video games, earning him the nickname "king of the techno-thriller," died Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after a brief illness. He was 66. "When he published 'The Hunt for Red October' he redefined and expanded the genre and as a consequence of that, a lot of people were able to publish such books who had previously been unable to do so," said Stephen C. Hunter, a Baltimore author and Pulitzer Prize-winning former film critic for The Washington Post.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy didn't realize he was forever changing the spy novel back in 1982, while working in obscurity on his first book, a Cold War thriller centering on the defection of a Soviet naval captain and the technologically advanced submarine he includes in the bargain. But then "The Hunt for Red October" was published, and things would never be the same - not for spy fiction, which was given new life by the detail-obsessed "techno-thriller" genre he invented, and certainly not for Clancy, who seemingly out of nowhere became one of the country's most prominent authors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
At the start of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel "Dracula," a London lawyer named Harker visits Transylvania to facilitate a real estate deal for a mysterious count who desires new digs in England. Not anything freshly built, or even modestly rehabbed, mind you. Something old and crumbling will do fine, along the lines of the count's longtime castle, with its "dark window openings" and "frowning walls" that form "a jagged line against the sky. " Harker has found just the thing, he tells the count, an "ancient structure, built of heavy stones," a property that "has not been repaired for a large number of years" and has many trees that "make it in places gloomy.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 30, 2003
No doubt about it - actress Laurel Burggraf can scream with the best of 'em. When she lets loose a blood-curdling yell - which she does early and often in Peter Colley's I'll Be Back Before Midnight - she makes you want to run for cover. And that's as it should be since Colley's play is a thriller, which has opened just in time for Halloween at the Vagabond Players. But aside from Burggraf's strong vocal cords (and strong overall performance), this is a rather troubled production. The chief problem is that, under James Knipple's direction, it's difficult to tell whether the show is intended as a psychological chiller or a merely a spoof of one. I suspect it's the former, largely because much of the laughter it elicited on opening night seemed to be of the "laughing at," not "laughing with," variety.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | August 30, 2009
About 40 purported grown-ups recently got in touch with their inner zombies - though it's probably fair to say that precious few actual representatives of the moldering undead give way to fits of giggles while performing the Booty Swim. Rose Bean, 56, of Taneytown, a stalwart of not one, but two, roller-skating clubs, couldn't suppress a very un-zombielike "hee-hee" as she tried to replicate the dance move demonstrated by instructor Cheryl Goodman, which consists of a rapid butt-wriggle coupled with a breast-stroking motion made by the arms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Even in our LED age, there is still something deliciously spooky about the sight of gas jets getting fainter, for no apparent reason, inside the glass lamps of a lush Victorian parlor. It's the unforgettable visual motif many a movie fan will always associate with “Gaslight,” the 1944 hit that won Ingrid Bergman an Academy Award as a pitiful wife being slowly driven insane by her husband - mysterious dimming had a lot to do with it. The inspiration for that film, Patrick Hamilton's sturdy little thriller “Angel Street,” doesn't enjoy quite as much fame these days, which makes the play's handsome revival by the Olney Theatre Center all the more welcome.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
In one way or another, Manil Suri has spent his entire life charting what happens when polar opposites are brought together in unexpected and at times startling juxtapositions. Suri, 53, is an acclaimed novelist, and a career mathematician who teaches at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He spent the first two decades of his life in India and the past three in the United States. Though all his books to date have been set in Mumbai, they are written in English. Suri's debut novel, "The Death of Vishnu," set off a bidding war between 11 publishing houses in 2001.
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