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Three Months

BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2002
Borrowers repaying student loans may have more money in their pockets beginning this summer, when the variable interest rates on their loans are expected to drop to the lowest level in the program's history. Variable interest rates on federally backed student loans are adjusted each July. They are tied to the three-month Treasury bill rate as of the last auction in May, which occurs next week. With recent rates holding steady, loan experts are predicting that the rate on Stafford loans now being repaid could be around 4.1 percent, a drop of nearly 2 percentage points.
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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Hart Senate Office Building, which had been sealed for months as an anthrax hot zone, reopened yesterday like a time capsule. Fax machines rumbled to life, spitting out documents stuck in their memories from last fall. Bagged lunches awaited their owners, moldy in office refrigerators. Long-lost jackets and dress shoes sat at desks. Calendars were frozen on Oct. 17, the last day that workers had occupied their offices. "Look what I found," said Carrie Markey, an assistant to Sen. Harry Reid, a Nevada Democrat.
BUSINESS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 2001
A little more than a year ago, Joe and Toni Shaney were living a happy and comfortable life in a beautiful five-bedroom, 3 1/2 -bath home on Charles Street in Baltimore County. Joe Shaney tended to the half-acre, while she enjoyed working her garden. At the time he was 57 and held a position as a computer specialist at the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay. She was 53 and working in the guidance office at Dumbarton Middle School. The plan was to stay in the home for another 10 years, retire and then move into a condominium where they could enjoy their golden years.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2001
Assaults on Howard County police officers jumped substantially in the first quarter of this year, compared with the same period last year, and robberies also showed an increase from a year ago, police reported yesterday. The increase in the number of robberies, from 36 to 48, and the number of homicides, from zero to three, during the first three months of the year counterbalanced a drop in the number of aggravated assaults - resulting in a 6.7 percent overall increase in violent crime, compared with the first quarter of last year.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2001
Howard County builders will have to put their development plans on hold until October because of a delay in getting more-accurate school enrollment projections, the key to Howard's complex system of development controls. The projections usually are available in May so that the council can vote in July. This year, because a consultant was hired, the numbers will not be ready until July, and the council, which does not meet in August, will not vote until October. To avoid confusion, the Robey administration has decided to wait for the more-accurate numbers the consultant is preparing.
NEWS
April 30, 2001
JUNICHIRO Koizumi, the brash reformer, beat the bosses for rank-and-file support to lead the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) and become prime minister of Japan. He is an unlikely rebel, a third-generation LDP member of parliament and Cabinet minister. The same may be said of his blunt-speaking foreign minister, Makiko Tanaka, the first woman in the post, the most popular politician in Japan and daughter of a former prime minister and LDP patronage boss. Japan certainly needs economic reforms, bank reforms and drastic reduction in feather-bedded government employment.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 3, 2001
WASHINGTON - An index of U.S. manufacturing unexpectedly rose in March for the second straight month, suggesting that factory weakness is a diminishing threat to the economy's record-long expansion. The National Association of Purchasing Management's factory index rose to 43.1 last month from 41.9 in February. In January, the index fell to 41.2, the lowest level in a decade, as manufacturers cut production to reduce overstocked inventories. March's index was also the first since December to be above 42.7, the level that NAPM says historically corresponds to conditions of a recession.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2001
Maryland lawmakers may like to think they serve their constituents, their political party - their country, even. But their one true and heartless master is time. In the last days before the General Assembly adjourns Monday, when dozens of legislators remain standing thanks to antibiotics and Coca-Cola, no policy tool is more deftly manipulated or resented than the clock. With about 2,400 bills to consider across three months, the inviolability of the 24-hour day means that decisions about domestic violence, abandoned babies, anti-discrimination law and drunken driving are sometimes made under great pressure - and long after many people's bedtime.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Laura Vozzella and Lorraine Mirabella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2001
Bibelot, the homegrown bookstore chain that became a neighborhood hangout and forum for local authors, is shutting its doors nearly six years after it emerged on a retail scene dominated by bigger national stores. The Baltimore area's largest independent book and music seller filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Friday in Baltimore. It plans to close its four stores and lay off an estimated 100 employees within three months. "It's a real loss for the independent book-selling world," said Avin Mark Domnitz, chief executive officer of the American Booksellers Association in Tarrytown, N.Y. "They were really kind of a beacon that the world of independents was not synonymous with small, that independents come in all sizes and all specialties."
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2001
Expected seasonal layoffs pushed Maryland's unemployment rate up to 4.0 percent in January, but economists warned yesterday that the worst is yet to come. Many expect the first signs of an economic slowdown to surface over the next three months as more companies close their doors or downsize in the face of slumping sales. That means the number of jobless will probably grow in Maryland. "We really have not yet begun to see the impact of a lot of the layoffs in Maryland that have been announced but have yet to take place," said Anirban Basu, chief economist for RESI, the economic forecasting arm of Towson University.
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