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Three Months

NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - After a three-month search, American inspectors have found no chemical, biological or nuclear weapons in Iraq and don't know whether any existed before the United States led an invasion of the country in March, the inspections coordinator told Congress yesterday. But David Kay, the search coordinator, said in what he called an interim report that his team had found "dozens" of activities related to unconventional weapons programs and evidence that Saddam Hussein intended to resume development and production of the weapons once sanctions imposed by the United Nations were lifted.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2003
The Maryland Jockey Club announced yesterday that it will close the Pimlico Race Course stables for three months this winter, forcing trainers with horses at the Baltimore track to move to Laurel Park, the Bowie Training Center or private farms. Lou Raffetto Jr., chief operating officer of the jockey club, said the closure will save the track money and facilitate barn cleanup and repairs, as well as rodent eradication. He said the horse population at Pimlico during the winter is about 400. The stables will be closed from Nov. 29 to March 1, a period when racing takes place at Laurel Park.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2003
Monika Sherman was looking forward to a quiet celebration in Baldwin for her 60th birthday on April 15 -- just her husband, Anthony, and any of their four children and nine grandchildren who could join them. Her son and her three daughters had other plans. After nearly three months of undercover calls and espionage-style e-mails from one family member to another, they managed to pull off a surprise just a few days earlier that included a reunion with Sherman's only sister, Gisela Chavanne, who lives in Oregon and whom she hadn't seen in nearly 20 years.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2003
The Maryland Transit Administration will add "quiet cars" to 10 morning MARC trains starting Monday, after a three-month experiment with the concept proved highly popular with commuters. On the MARC Penn Line, the early-morning trains 401 and 503 have had designated quiet cars since January. The rules are simple: No cell phones, no pagers, no children, and conversation must be hushed. Starting Monday, each morning Penn Line train headed to Washington through the 8:10 a.m. departure will have a designated quiet car. They include trains 405, 507, 409, 511, 413 and 415. Also, a quiet car will be added to Camden Line trains 841 and 843 and Brunswick Line trains 870 and 890 - the first two Washington-bound departures of the morning on those routes.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2003
The Carroll commissioners took another step toward revamping the county's procedure for enforcing ethics standards yesterday, appointing an eight-member task force to rewrite the ethics code in more specific language and to develop a consistent procedure for reviewing allegations against county officials. The commissioners said they expect the group, led by recently appointed county ethics officer Richard J. Simmons, to give them recommendations for changes to the ethics code within three months.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - Economists scaled back forecasts of economic growth for a second-straight month as expectations waned for a rebound in consumer spending and inventory building, the latest Blue Chip Economic Indicators survey found yesterday. The economy will probably expand 2.6 percent this year, down from the forecast of 2.7 percent that the survey found last month, according to the consensus of 54 economists. Gross domestic product grew 2.4 percent in 2002. The outlook "continued to deteriorate over the past month as surging energy prices, the likelihood of an imminent U.S. war with Iraq and severe winter weather caused many panel members to trim estimates of GDP in the first half of the year," this month's report said.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2002
Three plastic grocery bags cartwheeled in a strong wind down a Southwest Baltimore street, fluttering past Lt. Jerry VanDerMeulen's unmarked patrol car. For an instant, VanDerMeulen focused on the bags before returning his attention to the corner, scanning for potential trouble. But the streets were deserted - an unusual circumstance for a Friday night at West Pratt and Monroe streets, an intersection with a reputation for drug dealing. The empty corner did not surprise VanDerMeulen, a 31-year veteran.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2002
And on the fifth day, Wall Street rested. After starting the week with a 269-point drop and following it with three days of triple-digit gains, the Dow Jones industrial average took a breather yesterday and added 33.43 points on a day of light trading. The 30-stock blue-chip index was down more than 135 points in the first hour of trading but quickly recovered and spent the rest of the day swinging between modest gains and losses before closing at 8,745.45. "Everybody is taking a three-day vacation.
NEWS
By Andrew Jacobs and Andrew Jacobs,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 2002
KINGSTON, N.J. - It's hard to imagine anyone, let alone George Washington, sleeping at Rockingham, the 288-year-old clapboard mansion that served as his final headquarters toward the end of the American Revolution. Like some beached and eviscerated whale, the house sits along the main road here with one facade stripped of its double-height balcony and another sheathed in jarring white plastic. Carpenter bees are boring into the pea-soup green siding, water is collecting in the basement and splotches of mildew are spreading through the plaster and oak ballroom where Martha Washington entertained James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and members of the Continental Congress.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Howard Libit and Andrew A. Green and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2002
The race for the 8th Congressional District seat in Montgomery County is on pace to be one of the most expensive in the nation, with the incumbent and her two challengers having raised more than $1 million each, financial disclosure reports filed yesterday show. While candidates in Baltimore County's 2nd District haven't been able to match those figures, fund raising in that race - which got under way three months ago - has also gotten off to a healthy start, with County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger reporting more than $460,000 in donations, more than twice as much as the leading Republican, former U.S. Rep. Helen Delich Bentley.
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