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Three Months

NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 4, 2007
CHICAGO -- A new drug looks poised to become the first effective treatment for liver cancer, one of the deadliest and most common cancers in the world, whose incidence has been rising in the United States, doctors said yesterday. In a large clinical trial, the drug, called Nexavar, extended the lives of patients by almost three months, or 44 percent. While that is far from a cure, experts say it represents a breakthrough after years of efforts to find a drug that works. "We did not have anything for these patients," said Dr. Josep M. Llovet, one of the principal investigators in the trial.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Three months after the United States successfully pressed the United Nations to impose strict sanctions on North Korea because of the country's nuclear test, Bush administration officials allowed Ethiopia to complete a secret arms purchase from North Korea, in what appears to be a violation of the restrictions, according to senior U.S. officials. The United States allowed the arms delivery to go through in January in part because Ethiopian troops were in the midst of a military offensive against Islamic militias inside Somalia, a campaign that aided the U.S. policy of combating religious extremists in the Horn of Africa.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2005
Two years ago, the Howard County state's attorney's office packed up its files and moved from the circuit courthouse up the street to plusher and roomier space in the Carroll Building, planning to stay for a while. Three months ago, part of the county planning and zoning staff moved into the same building in the Ellicott City county government complex off Court House Drive. Now, both groups are being forced to find temporary office space. All 65 employees in the Carroll Building are relocating for a few months after traces of asbestos were discovered in the ceiling above the first floor.
NEWS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
Jerry Volker couldn't be prouder of his son, Chris, these days. And vice versa. Rightly so. While Chris, a senior captain on Old Mill's wrestling team, has been a dominating presence in the middle of the third-ranked Patriots' lineup this season, his father has been serving in a more global arena. A manager with the U.S. Department of Defense, Jerry Volker recently returned home after a three-month stay in Baghdad. "I really look up to my dad. He volunteered for that, and I really respect him for that," said Chris Volker, who accepted an appointment at the U.S. Military Academy, where he'll play lacrosse.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2005
Until July, Paula Casagrande never gave much thought to owning a home. She was content in her rented Victorian house on Ontario Street in downtown Havre de Grace. "A flood forced me out," she says, remembering the day six months ago when a storm damaged many low-lying areas near the Susquehanna River. Casagrande, 42, is owner of Big House Signs, a company that makes banners and lettering for vehicle windows. After the flood, Casagrande stayed with neighbors but discovered early on that she needed her own kitchen.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
A 26-year-old Taneytown man was sentenced yesterday to serve three consecutive 18-month terms at the Carroll County Detention Center on multiple convictions, including the theft of four contractors' work vans that had been left running in the cold weather last winter, a county prosecutor said. David Robert Leatherman of the first block of Fairground Ave. was convicted in August of theft of motor vehicles - three from homes and one near a convenience store, said Jennifer L. Darby, assistant state's attorney.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2004
To understand both sides of Baltimore County's debate on summer reading, meet the Diggins family. Alyssa, 13, is in the eighth grade at Perry Hall Middle School, where summer reading was optional - albeit strongly recommended - this year. She started a few books but didn't finish any. Brett, 16, is a junior in Advanced Placement classes at Perry Hall High. By the first day of school, he had to have read The Catcher in the Rye and The Grapes of Wrath, and completed 25 journal entries on Catcher.
NEWS
By Brian Patterson and Brian Patterson,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
For more than three decades, a mid-19th-century buggy has been part of the Carroll County Farm Museum's transportation exhibit, but now it has become the centerpiece of the display after being decked out with a new custom-designed leather interior and a paint job. The restoration of the horse-powered buggy took three months and cost $3,400. The buggy is a unique and important piece of the collection because it is the best example of early transportation the museum owns, said Victoria Fowler, farm museum curator.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
TAKOMA PARK - It's not yet Thanksgiving - it's not even Halloween, for goodness' sake - but Christmas displays have already popped up in discount stores, vying with mountains of toy pumpkins and candy corn for shoppers' attention. After years of watching this ever-expanding holiday blur, the Center for a New American Dream says enough, already. The Montgomery County-based nonprofit group, whose slogan is "More Fun, Less Stuff," encourages people to consume responsibly to protect the environment.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Andrea F. Siegel and Stephen Kiehl and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2003
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - One truckload of evidence. Five new metal detectors. Ten new sheriff's deputies. Seventy concrete barriers around the courthouse - and enough deluxe portable toilets to handle a press corps of presidential proportions. The trial of sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad begins Tuesday in Virginia Beach, and the preparations have gone far beyond assembling the evidence and witnesses to prove his guilt or innocence. Lawyers and law enforcement authorities are facing all sorts of other pressing questions, such as: Where do you store the evidence in Virginia Beach?
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