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NEWS
June 23, 2014
The Washington Redskins registered their trademark with the U.S. Patent Office in 1967. From all accounts, there were no complaints. That same office, acting arbitrarily, capriciously and unreasonably, revoked the trademark this week, bowing to continuing pressure from groups opposed to the name as a "racial slur" ( "Washington's offensive line," June 20). Oklahoma, which got it's name from the Choctaw Indians, means, "red people"! Should the state be forced to change it's name, also?
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NEWS
June 23, 2014
The Washington Redskins registered their trademark with the U.S. Patent Office in 1967. From all accounts, there were no complaints. That same office, acting arbitrarily, capriciously and unreasonably, revoked the trademark this week, bowing to continuing pressure from groups opposed to the name as a "racial slur" ( "Washington's offensive line," June 20). Oklahoma, which got it's name from the Choctaw Indians, means, "red people"! Should the state be forced to change it's name, also?
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NEWS
By Ralph E. Shaffer and R. William Robinson | November 19, 2007
With overwhelming bipartisan support, Rep. Jane Harman's "Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism Prevention Act" passed the House 404-6 late last month and now rests in Sen. Joe Lieberman's Homeland Security Committee. Swift Senate passage appears certain. Not since the "Patriot Act" of 2001 has any bill so threatened our constitutionally guaranteed rights. The historian Henry Steele Commager, denouncing President John Adams' suppression of free speech in the 1790s, argued that the Bill of Rights was not written to protect government from dissenters but to provide a legal means for citizens to oppose a government they didn't trust.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling may be a lot of things, probably negative to most people, but first and foremost he is a citizen of the United States. If a person is engaged in an intimate or personal conversation, he would presume that it is one of a private nature. I guess the liberal media doesn't respect First Amendment rights! They have taken to this story like lions to the Christians! The left wing often explains freedom of speech as "protection of words that most find abhorrent"; where are they on this one?
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 12, 2000
VLADIMIR Ilyich -- aka Bud -- Selig, premier of the Stalinist Republic of Major League Baseball, has decreed that Atlanta Braves relief pitcher John Rocker undergo psychological evaluation before the commissioner decides whether he will discipline Rocker for his perceived sins. To briefly rehash, Rocker made comments to Sports Illustrated magazine in which he offended America's gay lobby, minority lobby and our ever-expanding "won't learn English even if you put a gun to our heads" lobby.
FEATURES
By Josh Getlin and Josh Getlin,Los Angeles Times | January 25, 1994
Michael Crichton looks like a winner but feels like a dinosaur.True, he stands to make millions from his new novel, "Disclosure," just as he did with "Jurassic Park," "Rising Sun" and other blockbusters. Yet to hear him talk, he and other free-thinkers face extinction in a fight for survival with feminists and the pooh-bahs of political correctness."There's absolutely a chill in the workplace these days," Mr. Crichton says, picking lint off his Armani suit and scowling down at Central Park, 43 floors below his hotel suite.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 14, 1996
Read more, folks. It'll inform ya.For instance, I didn't know before reading the latest copy of Emerge magazine that Sidney Poitier's roles in the films "To Sir With Love" and "Lilies of the Field" were racially degrading.But if Emerge is quoting singer/actor Harry Belafonte correctly, I've been harboring a delusion all these years. "To Sir With Love" and "Lilies of the Field" are two of my favorite films. But to Belafonte, the Poitier roles in those films were "racially offensive."Goes to show you how "racially offensive" matters are strictly in the eyes of the beholder.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling may be a lot of things, probably negative to most people, but first and foremost he is a citizen of the United States. If a person is engaged in an intimate or personal conversation, he would presume that it is one of a private nature. I guess the liberal media doesn't respect First Amendment rights! They have taken to this story like lions to the Christians! The left wing often explains freedom of speech as "protection of words that most find abhorrent"; where are they on this one?
FEATURES
By Crystal Williams | July 5, 2000
Each landing, opposite the lift-shaft, the poster with the enormous face gazed from the wall. It was one of those pictures, which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran."- from Chapter One of "Nineteen Eighty-Four," by George Orwell When CBS' "Big Brother" takes to the airwaves tonight, George Orwell might be turning over in his grave: His nightmarish vision of a totalitarian future has been co-opted as the inspiration for a much-anticipated TV game show.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
Apparently the thought police are alive and well. How is it possible that in a country where everyone is supposed to be entitled to their opinion, a person can be judged unfit to write a comic book just because they oppose gay marriage ("Superman author choice won't fly, some fans say," Feb. 22)? What has the one thing got to do with the other? How many people reading a Superman comic even know the author's position on gay marriage, or care? Those who oppose gay marriage are just supposed to accept it without complaint, while those who support it are entitled to keep vilifying those who take a different view.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
Apparently the thought police are alive and well. How is it possible that in a country where everyone is supposed to be entitled to their opinion, a person can be judged unfit to write a comic book just because they oppose gay marriage ("Superman author choice won't fly, some fans say," Feb. 22)? What has the one thing got to do with the other? How many people reading a Superman comic even know the author's position on gay marriage, or care? Those who oppose gay marriage are just supposed to accept it without complaint, while those who support it are entitled to keep vilifying those who take a different view.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | June 3, 2009
The Baltimore police officer who rescued the pit bull that was set on fire last week has a pit bull herself. The pup's name is Blu, and is chocolate-brown with white markings, silky fur and green eyes. "He's a cutie," Officer Syreeta Teel said, showing off a picture on her iPhone of her pet slobbering a wet kiss on her face. "If anyone did that to my dog, I'd be crushed." Last Wednesday, two days before her own dog's first birthday, Teel turned her squad car around a corner, saw smoke and an animal similar to Blu in flames.
NEWS
November 26, 2007
No right to plan an act of violence Ralph E. Shaffer and R. William Robinson miss the point in the column "Here come the thought police" (Opinion * Commentary, Nov. 19). They view Rep. Jane Harman's new anti-terrorism bill as an ominous threat to free speech. In particular, they claim that the bill's definition of "home-grown terrorism" (as involving "planned" or "threatened" use of force to coerce the government or the people in the promotion of "political or social objectives") would allow the government to punish the mere thought of using force.
NEWS
By Ralph E. Shaffer and R. William Robinson | November 19, 2007
With overwhelming bipartisan support, Rep. Jane Harman's "Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism Prevention Act" passed the House 404-6 late last month and now rests in Sen. Joe Lieberman's Homeland Security Committee. Swift Senate passage appears certain. Not since the "Patriot Act" of 2001 has any bill so threatened our constitutionally guaranteed rights. The historian Henry Steele Commager, denouncing President John Adams' suppression of free speech in the 1790s, argued that the Bill of Rights was not written to protect government from dissenters but to provide a legal means for citizens to oppose a government they didn't trust.
FEATURES
By Crystal Williams | July 5, 2000
Each landing, opposite the lift-shaft, the poster with the enormous face gazed from the wall. It was one of those pictures, which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran."- from Chapter One of "Nineteen Eighty-Four," by George Orwell When CBS' "Big Brother" takes to the airwaves tonight, George Orwell might be turning over in his grave: His nightmarish vision of a totalitarian future has been co-opted as the inspiration for a much-anticipated TV game show.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 12, 2000
VLADIMIR Ilyich -- aka Bud -- Selig, premier of the Stalinist Republic of Major League Baseball, has decreed that Atlanta Braves relief pitcher John Rocker undergo psychological evaluation before the commissioner decides whether he will discipline Rocker for his perceived sins. To briefly rehash, Rocker made comments to Sports Illustrated magazine in which he offended America's gay lobby, minority lobby and our ever-expanding "won't learn English even if you put a gun to our heads" lobby.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1997
A kitchen supervisor at a popular Harborplace seafood restaurant was charged yesterday with fatally stabbing a cook in what city police say is the first slaying at the Inner Harbor since it was transformed into a tourist attraction in 1980.A handful of customers was finishing all-you-can-eat buffet meals at Phillips Harborplace Express about 9: 20 p.m. Wednesday when the suspect allegedly grabbed a chef's knife with a 12-inch blade and stabbed the victim in the left side of the chest.The cook, identified in court papers as Darryl Luttrell, 20, was attacked in an area between the kitchen and a buffet counter, apparently out of view of most patrons, police said.
NEWS
July 2, 1997
India, Pakistan should make realistic gainsThe June 24 news story, ''India, Pakistan to discuss Kashmir, other disputes,'' highlights the fact that relations between the two South Asian neighbors have been strained for 50 years over Kashmir.As a significant first step, both nations have agreed to stop propaganda and provocative actions against each other. At long last, it appears, there is hope on the Indian subcontinent.Prime Ministers Inder K. Gujral of India and Nawaz Sharif of Pakistan deserve a lot of credit for taking bold steps.
NEWS
By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
State police released audits yesterday showing that failures to properly log domestic restraining orders, to prevent accused abusers from buying guns, are more pervasive than officials previously acknowledged.All of the 21 jurisdictions audited by the state police frequently failed to correctly enter the protective orders, listing the wrong gender, name or race.The audits released yesterday were of mostly rural jurisdictions. The state police plan to begin auditing Baltimore City today."We are suffering from lack of staff, and I know people are tired of hearing that, but it is very much a reality," said George F. Johnson IV, president of the Maryland Sheriff's Association.
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