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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2004
Rosecroft Raceway and the state's thoroughbred interests have agreed to a 90-day resumption of thoroughbred simulcasting at Rosecroft, the harness track in Prince George's County, and the return of night simulcasting at Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park, the state's major thoroughbred tracks. Representatives of the two sides began negotiating after Tuesday's contentious Maryland Racing Commission meeting at which thoroughbred leaders objected vehemently to Rosecroft's request to begin simulcasting thoroughbred races without compensating the state's thoroughbred interests.
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NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | April 3, 2009
Interest in Maryland's thoroughbred tracks put up for auction by their bankrupt owner is growing with the emergence of another potential buyer, who envisions razing historic Pimlico Race Course and building a shopping center in its place. Pikesville developer Carl Verstandig, whose America's Realty LLC often invests in distressed urban retail projects, said Thursday that he will not bid on the Preakness Stakes, the storied racing event held at Pimlico and the second leg of the Triple Crown.
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SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2002
Maryland's major thoroughbred racetracks doubled their combined profit last year, thanks to a record Preakness Stakes, according to financial statements released yesterday. Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore posted a profit of $3.9 million, double that of the year before, because of strong Preakness attendance and wagering, as well as troubles at sister track Laurel Park. Pimlico's gain was, however, Laurel's loss: the Anne Arundel County track reported a loss of $2.4 million, nearly twice the $1.3 million loss posted the year before.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2004
Rosecroft Raceway and the state's thoroughbred interests have agreed to a 90-day resumption of thoroughbred simulcasting at Rosecroft, the harness track in Prince George's County, and the return of night simulcasting at Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park, the state's major thoroughbred tracks. Representatives of the two sides began negotiating after Tuesday's contentious Maryland Racing Commission meeting at which thoroughbred leaders objected vehemently to Rosecroft's request to begin simulcasting thoroughbred races without compensating the state's thoroughbred interests.
NEWS
November 8, 1997
MARYLAND'S racing commission acted wisely in its recent decision to reject a plan by harness-racing interests to compete against the state's thoroughbred tracks for crucial simulcasting wagering dollars. The last thing the troubled equine industry needs is a bitter feud within the family.Now the two squabbling sides ought to sit down and work out a plan to help them regain financial health. A Lone Ranger approach not only would be divisive but would divert attention and energy from the tracks' main danger: the loss of top horses, trainers and bettors to the slots-rich Delaware tracks.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman | June 5, 2004
Fans at Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park who want to bet on today's Belmont Stakes - and cash out if they win - will be able to, despite the continuing dispute between the thoroughbred tracks and the state's standardbred tracks over how to share revenue from simulcasting. In April, Pimlico and Laurel Park began closing at night because state law says that in a dispute over simulcasting, the standardbred side can shut down the thoroughbred tracks after 6:15 p.m. Post time for today's Belmont Stakes is scheduled for 6:38 p.m. But, according to Pimlico spokesman Mike Gathagan, the rule doesn't apply on so-called "big days."
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | September 11, 1999
An appeals court has ruled against an effort by Rosecroft Raceway, a harness racing track near Washington, to simulcast thoroughbred racing independent of the state's thoroughbred tracks.For several years, thoroughbred and harness tracks have telecast and accepted bets on each other's races and those coming from out of state through a complicated agreement in which they shared tracks and revenue. Last year, Rosecroft withdrew from the agreement with the thoroughbred tracks -- owned by the Maryland Jockey Club -- and sought permission from the Maryland Racing Commission to simulcast out-of-town thoroughbred races in competition with the Jockey Club.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | February 22, 1991
The state's thoroughbred tracks wannt to initiate twilight racing at its summer meets, starting in June at Pimlico.However, the move is expected to be opposed by harness racing representatives who see it as an infringement into the night racing time slot traditionally allotted to the trotters.The move requires a change in the existing law that now requires thoroughbred racing to end at 6:15 p.m.However, a bill to change that has been introduced on behalf of the thoroughbred tracks by state senators Thomas Bromwell (D-Baltimore County)
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | December 8, 1992
Harness racing has moved a step closer to having a nighttime simulcast center in Baltimore.Last night, harness horsemen met in Kent Island and unanimously approved a financial agreement with the management of Rosecroft and Delmarva raceways that paves the way for standardbred races to be simulcast into Laurel and Pimlico thoroughbred tracks at night.The intertrack "cross-breed" arrangement, in which thoroughbred races then would be simulcast in the afternoons at Rosecroft and Delmarva, is expected to start Jan. 22, according to an official of the harness tracks.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1997
State Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. urged racing regulators yesterday to defer to the General Assembly on the contentious issue of who can profit from "simulcasting" out-of-state horse races to Maryland bettors.Curran's stance could prompt the Maryland Racing Commission tomorrow to delay a decision in a long-simmering dispute between the state's thoroughbred track owners and the Bally hotel-casino company.Bally Entertainment Corp., which owns a Standardbred track near Ocean City, has challenged the status quo in Maryland racing by seeking to build an off-track betting facility in Hagerstown to simulcast out-of-state thoroughbred races without sharing profits with Maryland's track owners.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman | June 5, 2004
Fans at Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park who want to bet on today's Belmont Stakes - and cash out if they win - will be able to, despite the continuing dispute between the thoroughbred tracks and the state's standardbred tracks over how to share revenue from simulcasting. In April, Pimlico and Laurel Park began closing at night because state law says that in a dispute over simulcasting, the standardbred side can shut down the thoroughbred tracks after 6:15 p.m. Post time for today's Belmont Stakes is scheduled for 6:38 p.m. But, according to Pimlico spokesman Mike Gathagan, the rule doesn't apply on so-called "big days."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
NORTH EAST - Rosecroft Raceway might lay off 100 to 125 employees within two weeks, and Pimlico and Laurel Park have already laid off 20 to 25 workers as the result of a dispute over simulcast revenues, heads of the tracks said yesterday. News of the layoffs emerged during the Maryland Racing Commission's contentious hearing of Northwind Racing's application to buy Rosecroft, a harness track in Prince George's County. The commission met at the North East Racing and Sports Club - the former Poor Jimmy's OTB - and will resume the hearing this morning at Pimlico.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2003
Largely invisible to the outside world, the racetrack backstretch exists as home to the thoroughbreds that power an industry and to the people who take care of them. Inside fences and behind guarded gates, 539 people who groom and walk horses live at Pimlico, Laurel Park or the Bowie Training Center. No one gets in without a pass or worker's ID. The residents rise before dawn and live by a rhythm set by their animals and set apart from society. Their communities are dilapidated. The three backstretches have become unsightly mishmashes of rundown barns, rutted horse paths, potholes, uneven pavement, abandoned vehicles, uncollected trash, standing water and muck.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2002
Maryland's major thoroughbred racetracks doubled their combined profit last year, thanks to a record Preakness Stakes, according to financial statements released yesterday. Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore posted a profit of $3.9 million, double that of the year before, because of strong Preakness attendance and wagering, as well as troubles at sister track Laurel Park. Pimlico's gain was, however, Laurel's loss: the Anne Arundel County track reported a loss of $2.4 million, nearly twice the $1.3 million loss posted the year before.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2000
Maryland's major thoroughbred racetracks have pared their expenses and last year posted their highest profit since 1995, according to financial results reported to state regulators. The Maryland Jockey Club, owner of Pimlico Racecourse and Laurel Park, reported a combined profit of $2.46 million for 1999. That is up considerably from the $136,547 net income reported the previous year, when the tracks spent $2.4 million on a campaign to win legalization of slot machine gaming in the state.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | March 26, 2000
WHAT WOULD a General Assembly session be without a horse-racing feud? We've got a doozy this year. Everyone in Annapolis wants to tell track owners how to run their business. So does a powerful competitor from Delaware. This has been complicated by a power play from the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association against the rival harness-racing industry. The group wants to run night races at Laurel and Pimlico in direct competition with harness tracks. All of this is placing in jeopardy a plan to renovate Laurel, Pimlico and Rosecroft.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
Operators of the state's thoroughbred and harness tracks met for the second time in four days yesterday, but again failed to reach an agreement that could keep alive an experimental, cross-breed simulcasting program between the two sets of tracks.However, the two sides will meet again on Friday. In the meantime, they will continue to operate the inter-track program, although Pimlico/Laurel operator Joe De Francis originally had threatened to shut it down on Thursday.De Francis reiterated yesterday his intention to stop the program, under the terms agreed to by both parties before the experiment began about three weeks ago, if financial terms are not reworked.
NEWS
March 11, 1999
OPENING a third thoroughbred racetrack in Maryland would be a losing proposition. Anyone making such an investment would be doing so for reasons other than turning a profit.That's the judgment of experts in the field who view Gov. Parris N. Glendening's proposal to authorize additional thoroughbred tracks as a none-too-subtle attempt to punish Joseph A. De Francis, owner of the Laurel and Pimlico tracks -- who gave strong support to Mr. Glendening's foes in last year's elections.Horse racing is an industry tottering on the edge.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | September 11, 1999
An appeals court has ruled against an effort by Rosecroft Raceway, a harness racing track near Washington, to simulcast thoroughbred racing independent of the state's thoroughbred tracks.For several years, thoroughbred and harness tracks have telecast and accepted bets on each other's races and those coming from out of state through a complicated agreement in which they shared tracks and revenue. Last year, Rosecroft withdrew from the agreement with the thoroughbred tracks -- owned by the Maryland Jockey Club -- and sought permission from the Maryland Racing Commission to simulcast out-of-town thoroughbred races in competition with the Jockey Club.
NEWS
March 11, 1999
OPENING a third thoroughbred racetrack in Maryland would be a losing proposition. Anyone making such an investment would be doing so for reasons other than turning a profit.That's the judgment of experts in the field who view Gov. Parris N. Glendening's proposal to authorize additional thoroughbred tracks as a none-too-subtle attempt to punish Joseph A. De Francis, owner of the Laurel and Pimlico tracks -- who gave strong support to Mr. Glendening's foes in last year's elections.Horse racing is an industry tottering on the edge.
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