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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2002
Milton Jenkins Dance Jr., an internationally known horse auctioneer, thoroughbred owner and cancer survivor who endowed the Milton J. Dance Jr. Head and Neck Cancer Rehabilitation Center at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died of a heart attack Thursday at his home in Manalapan, Fla. He was 76. Mr. Dance, who was known as Laddie, was born and raised in Glen Arm, the son of Milton J. Dance Sr., who established an auction and appraisal business in...
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Allan Vought and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Durbar II has been shocking people for more than a century. When the 3-year-old, French-bred, American-owned Thoroughbred won England's prestigious Epsom Derby in 1914, despite going off as a 20-1 long shot, the genteel world of English horse-racing was turned upside-down. When he made it out of war-torn Paris in the early days of World War I, at a time when many horses were being pressed into military service, he again bucked the odds. And today, when people hear that this famed Thoroughbred is buried in Bel Air, on the grounds of Harford Community College - well, it's safe to say that's news to most Harford County residents.
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NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1996
It's still not an investment for the weak of heart, but the market for thoroughbreds has begun climbing out of a steep slide that only a few years ago plunged farms into bankruptcy and sent race horses to meat-packing houses."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Priscilla Fuller Menzies, an equine painter whose subjects included the fabled thoroughbreds Native Dancer and Secretariat, died of complications from a stroke Aug. 24 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The former Butler resident was 94. Born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville and Upperco, she was the daughter of Perry Wade Fuller, a stamp and coin dealer, and Anita Sherwood Fuller, a sports enthusiast. She was a 1938 graduate of Garrison Forest School. She earned a bachelor's degree at what is now the Maryland Institute College of Art and studied with Jacques Maroger, a French-born painter who explored the own paint medium using old techniques and had been on the staff of the Louvre.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2003
WHEN PEOPLE think of Harford County, the horse industry might not immediately come to mind. But large commercial thoroughbred operations, as well as an influx of people into the county over the past 10 years, has built this segment of the area's agriculture. Growth in the horse industry is something John Sullivan, the county's agriculture director, likes to point out. "Equine and horticulture are on the upward trend. They are the fastest-growing agricultural industries in the county," Sullivan said.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2002
Fasig-Tipton Midlantic's winter mixed auction of thoroughbreds posted gains in gross and average yesterday at the sales pavilion in Timonium. A total of 123 horses were sold for $900,700, an average of $7,323 per horse. The average was up 18 percent and the gross up less than 1 percent over last year's sale. "You've got to be pleased with any `up,' " said T. Mason Grasty, executive vice president of the Elkton-based sales company. "The market was strong." Especially indicative of that was the number of horses taken back by their owners because bidding did not reach a predetermined minimum.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2004
The Fasig-Tipton Midlantic December mixed sale of thoroughbreds concluded yesterday at the Timonium fairgrounds with steep increases over last year's sale. The auction concluded a stellar year in horse sales at Timonium. Sunday and yesterday, 363 horses sold for $3,862,300, a 42.9 percent increase over last year's total. The average price of $10,640 was a 41.8 percent rise, and the median increased by 40.5 percent to $5,100. Weanlings, yearlings and racehorses were featured yesterday, and a Malibu Moon colt born March 10 topped the sale.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
Adelaide Close Riggs, one of the great supporters of Maryland's thoroughbred horse breeding and racing industry, rode until the age of 77, when her favorite pony had to be put down and she decided she was too old to break in a new one.Mrs. Riggs died Dec. 31 from complications of pneumonia at Happy Retreat, her 540-acre farm near the Howard County village of Daisy between West Friendship and Lisbon. She was 90."She was certainly one of the grandes dames of Maryland racing and an absolutely wonderful sportswoman," said Snowden Carter, retired editor of Maryland Horse magazine.
SPORTS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2000
Five jockeys and two thoroughbred owners have agreed to plead guilty to fixing races earlier this year at Penn National race track, federal prosecutors said yesterday. Under the plea agreements, filed yesterday in U.S. District Court in Harrisburg, each of the owners and jockeys could be sentenced to up to five years in prison and fined $250,000. David M. Barasch, United States attorney for the Middle District of Pennsylvania, said he does not expect any of the defendants to receive the maximum sentence.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1997
The regular monthly meeting of the Maryland Racing Commission was postponed yesterday because it lacked a quorum, and no progress was reported in the simulcasting feud between the states' thoroughbred and harness interests."
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | June 6, 2014
The case can be made that there is a lot more riding on California Chrome than a 100-pound jockey and a chance to be mentioned in the same conversation with the greatest thoroughbreds of all time. The case can be made that when Chrome bursts out of the starting gate at Belmont Park on Saturday, he'll be carrying the weight of the horse racing world on his chestnut shoulders. He won't just be chasing history. He won't just be trying to end a 36-year Triple Crown drought, though that's the main headline.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
Seventeen months after he became a one-day sensation by bolting free down U.S. 1, thoroughbred Bullet Catcher is set for a gentle retirement. Now 5 years old, with 20 starts behind him, the gelding is munching hay on a Montgomery County farm, waiting to be adopted. “He's just been a thrilling horse,” says owner Gina Rosenthal. “And now I really want a special person to take him and give him that good life.” Though a solid racer, Bullet Catcher was never destined to achieve fame on the track because of creaky knees.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Louis Edward "Scotty" Scott, a retired rider and thoroughbred trainer, died May 3 of heart disease at Sinai Hospital. He was 92 and lived in Pikesville. Born in Sparks, he was the son of Edward Scott, a horse trainer, and the former Cordelia Whye. He attended Sparks Elementary School. He began riding at the age of 12 and rode at Maryland race courses in the 1940s. He was an exercise rider for John Bosley Sr., who owned the Foxhall Keene Farm in Monkton in the early 1950s.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
This year's Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes have reminded America about what's great about horse racing. California Chrome has been a display of magnificence, and his story, and those of his trainer and owners, have been endearingly human. The mere possibility of the first Triple Crown winner in nearly four decades has rekindled the optimism that must be at the heart of every racing fan. But this year's Belmont Stakes has the potential to remind America about what's so maddening about horse racing.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Thoroughbred racing will resume at Pimlico Race Course on Thursday afternoon with a nine-race card to kick off the track's 35-day spring meeting. The schedule will be highlighted by the 139 t h Preakness Stakes, with a richer purse of $1.5 million, up from $1 million in 2013. Pimlico will host racing Thursday through Sunday until the May 17 Preakness and Friday through Sunday between the Preakness and the June 7 Belmont Stakes in New York. The Pimlico schedule will include 25 stakes races with purses totaling about $4.7 million.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
Thomas Horne Voss, a nationally known thoroughbred trainer and a lifelong Maryland horseman, died of an apparent heart attack Tuesday at his Monkton home. He was 63. Mr. Voss trained his horses at Atlanta Hall, a 1,200-acre farm in Monkton, where he developed a state-of-the-art thoroughbred racing training center for both flat runners and jumpers. "He was extremely intuitive when it came to understanding the psyche of horses and loved them with all of his heart and soul," said Ross Peddicord, executive director of the Maryland Horse Industry Board.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | March 11, 2004
The state's standardbred and thoroughbred industries have hoped for years that slots would come to Maryland and subsidize sagging purses, the prizes paid to top-finishing horses. Purses at competing tracks in Delaware and West Virginia soared after they installed slots. The Senate bill would designate 10 percent of slots proceeds (from track sites only) into a pool for purses. That would then be divided between the thoroughbred and standardbred segments by a formula based on horse race betting.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 27, 2007
Marguerite Finney Dance, retired senior editor of The Maryland Horse magazine and its successor publication, Mid-Atlantic Thoroughbred, died of pneumonia Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice. The North Baltimore resident was 74. Born Laura Marguerite Stanley Finney in Annapolis and raised in Towson, she was a 1948 graduate of Towson High School and earned a history degree with honors at what is now Randolph-Macon College in Lynchburg, Va. Family members said she grew up in a home where her father, Humphrey Stanley Finney, was field secretary of the Maryland Horse Breeders Association and founding editor of The Maryland Horse.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
In March, change came to Torrey Smith nearly as fast as one of his trademark fly patterns. Veteran wide receiver Anquan Boldin had been traded to the San Francisco 49ers after a contract dispute, and Smith was suddenly the Ravens' top receiver. The Ravens never needed a formal announcement to show their trust in Smith. But in dealing Boldin, they made certain that the former Maryland standout would take on a far more significant role in the Ravens' Super Bowl defense. Their faith now seems justified: Heading into Sunday's game against the Miami Dolphins at Sun Life Stadium, Smith has emerged as one of the best young receivers in the game.
NEWS
By Leah Polakoff, Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 29, 2013
I grew up riding horses and jumped at the chance to tune my skills with a lesson at Touch of Class Riding School in Aberdeen. Pulling into the driveway leading to Compass Farm, I realized I was in a thoroughbred sanctuary. Theresa Crowther, owner of the school, has 10 thoroughbreds and six ponies. While she spent most of her career working with racehorses, she has been teaching English riding for almost 10 years. The riding school offers lessons, summer camps, birthday parties and the chance to earn Scout badges.
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