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Thomas Wolfe

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By Michael Harris and Michael Harris,Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1992
THE LOST BOY.Thomas Wolfe.University of North Carolina.81 pages. $16.50.In 1937, a year before he died, Thomas Wolfe wrote a novella based on the death of his brother, Grover, from typhoid fever in 1904. Grover then was 12 and Thomas, the youngest child, only 4. The absence of Grover -- a precociously grave and gentle boy, his mother's favorite -- left a void in the family that, for Wolfe, was haunted by faint, elusive memories.The result was "The Lost Boy," a continuation of the Gant family saga that began with "Look Homeward, Angel."
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2009
In its second play of the season, Colonial Players delivers Richard Greenberg's "The Violet Hour," riveting, reflective theater that takes the audience into nostalgic and challenging territory. It is to my knowledge the first work performed in the area of the acclaimed contemporary playwright. He has written 27 plays, receiving numerous awards, including the Tony and Drama Desk, and is revered for his intellect and unpredictability. Set in 1919, "The Violet Hour" tells the story of a Princeton University-educated independent publisher launching his business and trying to decide which of two authors' books to publish - a friend's over-written work containing some brilliant writing, or that of his current love interest, a seductive African-American singer's honest autobiography.
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NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2001
ASHEVILLE, N.C. - In this small, restful city, the train still arrives daily over the Appalachian Mountains from Tennessee and the spa resorts still advertise the healing powers of fresh mountain air, just as they did almost a century ago. And in the small town squares, artisans and city folk still gather around the fountain steps and statues as they have for decades extolling the liberal, easygoing nature of the town, a shelter from the conservative politics...
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2001
ASHEVILLE, N.C. - In this small, restful city, the train still arrives daily over the Appalachian Mountains from Tennessee and the spa resorts still advertise the healing powers of fresh mountain air, just as they did almost a century ago. And in the small town squares, artisans and city folk still gather around the fountain steps and statues as they have for decades extolling the liberal, easygoing nature of the town, a shelter from the conservative politics...
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1997
Thomas Clayton Wolfe, the legendary author of "Look Homeward, Angel" and "Of Time and the River," arrived in Baltimore in the fall of 1937 from New York with the intention of possibly settling here.Baltimore seemed a quieter, more old-fashioned city.He had tried living in Manhattan but was continually bothered by people interrupting his work.He then moved to an apartment in Brooklyn that overlooked the harbor, "which he loves. Boats and trains have always fascinated him," said The Evening Sun in 1935.
FEATURES
By Jack Hurst and Jack Hurst,Chicago Tribune | April 2, 1995
Nestled in the shadows of the Smoky Mountains, Asheville, N.C., is rich with attractions, and two of them are residences that represent decidedly opposite ends of the spectrum.At one end is the 8,000-acre Biltmore Estate, which includes the 4-acre, 255-room Biltmore House built by world traveler George W. Vanderbilt, a New York shipping and railroad heir whose Carolina digs remain the largest private home in the United States.A few miles from the Biltmore's regal gate is the Old Kentucky Home, a comparatively Spartan 29-room boardinghouse that provided early shelter to star-crossed novelist Thomas Wolfe.
NEWS
By Nancy Pate and Nancy Pate,Orlando Sentinel | November 3, 1991
"O lost and by the wind grieved, ghost, come back again."I never read those words from "Look Homeward, Angel" without a sigh for the man who wrote them.In fact, when I was a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the mid-1970s I occasionally would visit the stone marker on campus dedicated to Thomas Wolfe, who was a student there in the 'teens, and read the words aloud. At that time, Wolfe was my all-time favorite writer and "Look Homeward, Angel," in all its youthful rhapsody, my favorite book.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2009
In its second play of the season, Colonial Players delivers Richard Greenberg's "The Violet Hour," riveting, reflective theater that takes the audience into nostalgic and challenging territory. It is to my knowledge the first work performed in the area of the acclaimed contemporary playwright. He has written 27 plays, receiving numerous awards, including the Tony and Drama Desk, and is revered for his intellect and unpredictability. Set in 1919, "The Violet Hour" tells the story of a Princeton University-educated independent publisher launching his business and trying to decide which of two authors' books to publish - a friend's over-written work containing some brilliant writing, or that of his current love interest, a seductive African-American singer's honest autobiography.
NEWS
March 10, 2005
Nell Caroline Roberts, 106, a globe-trotting bon vivant and one of Tennessee's oldest residents, died Sunday. Working in New York as an administrator at the Greenwich Village YWCA for 33 years, she befriended the likes of novelist Thomas Wolfe, sports journalist Red Smith and Frederick Franklin, a primary dancer with the Ballet Russe. When she retired from the YWCA in 1961, Ms. Roberts went on a months-long sailing voyage around the world. She had traveled to South America, Africa, Thailand and all the capitals of Europe.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | November 12, 2000
THOMAS WOLFE, the American romantic who spent his short life trying to cram the universe into a single sentence, had a big birthday last month. On Oct. 3, the day the United States Postal Service honored the author of "Look Homeward, Angel" with a stamp celebrating his life and work, Wolfe would have been 100. Instead, he died two weeks short of his 38th birthday of tuberculosis that destroyed his brain. In the late summer of 1938, Wolfe -- having visited every national park in the western United States in two weeks -- contracted pneumonia after downing a pint of liquor with a derelict on a ferryboat.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1997
Thomas Clayton Wolfe, the legendary author of "Look Homeward, Angel" and "Of Time and the River," arrived in Baltimore in the fall of 1937 from New York with the intention of possibly settling here.Baltimore seemed a quieter, more old-fashioned city.He had tried living in Manhattan but was continually bothered by people interrupting his work.He then moved to an apartment in Brooklyn that overlooked the harbor, "which he loves. Boats and trains have always fascinated him," said The Evening Sun in 1935.
FEATURES
By Jack Hurst and Jack Hurst,Chicago Tribune | April 2, 1995
Nestled in the shadows of the Smoky Mountains, Asheville, N.C., is rich with attractions, and two of them are residences that represent decidedly opposite ends of the spectrum.At one end is the 8,000-acre Biltmore Estate, which includes the 4-acre, 255-room Biltmore House built by world traveler George W. Vanderbilt, a New York shipping and railroad heir whose Carolina digs remain the largest private home in the United States.A few miles from the Biltmore's regal gate is the Old Kentucky Home, a comparatively Spartan 29-room boardinghouse that provided early shelter to star-crossed novelist Thomas Wolfe.
NEWS
By Michael Harris and Michael Harris,Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1992
THE LOST BOY.Thomas Wolfe.University of North Carolina.81 pages. $16.50.In 1937, a year before he died, Thomas Wolfe wrote a novella based on the death of his brother, Grover, from typhoid fever in 1904. Grover then was 12 and Thomas, the youngest child, only 4. The absence of Grover -- a precociously grave and gentle boy, his mother's favorite -- left a void in the family that, for Wolfe, was haunted by faint, elusive memories.The result was "The Lost Boy," a continuation of the Gant family saga that began with "Look Homeward, Angel."
NEWS
By Nancy Pate and Nancy Pate,Orlando Sentinel | November 3, 1991
"O lost and by the wind grieved, ghost, come back again."I never read those words from "Look Homeward, Angel" without a sigh for the man who wrote them.In fact, when I was a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the mid-1970s I occasionally would visit the stone marker on campus dedicated to Thomas Wolfe, who was a student there in the 'teens, and read the words aloud. At that time, Wolfe was my all-time favorite writer and "Look Homeward, Angel," in all its youthful rhapsody, my favorite book.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Last week, when I posted about training oneself to be an editor , someone commented on Facebook: " I'm curious, does any part of editor training involve breaking it to people gently? I would be surprised if it did, but I think that would be the hard part of editing, handing/sending back the document without making the writer want to quit writing. " Writer and editor experience an odd intimacy. Much as professionals school themselves to think that the text is an artifact, a product rather than an extension of the self, that text is still a personal expression.
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