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Thomas Viaduct

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By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
A 3-D animated video that reveals centuries-old construction secrets might hold the key to jump-starting local interest in restoring a beloved bridge to its original majesty. The Friends of Patapsco Valley and Heritage Greenway, self-appointed caretakers of the river valley that was first settled in the 1690s, hope so. While the age of any historic structure is usually enough to whip up avid support for its preservation, the Thomas Viaduct has a lot more going for it than its impressive July 4, 1835, birthday.
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NEWS
May 6, 2014
As a resident of the Relay/St. Denis community in Halethorpe and a member of the Relay Improvement Association, I was interested to read your recent article about the CSX railroad and the destruction on Charles Village's 26th Street ( "Deluge causes landslide in Charles Village, floods roadways across state," May 1). If the residents of 26th Street or the citizens of Baltimore expect anything from the CSX Corporation, they are wasting their time. We have been fighting this railroad for nearly 25 years while the Thomas Viaduct across the Patapsco River continues to deteriorate.
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NEWS
May 6, 2014
As a resident of the Relay/St. Denis community in Halethorpe and a member of the Relay Improvement Association, I was interested to read your recent article about the CSX railroad and the destruction on Charles Village's 26th Street ( "Deluge causes landslide in Charles Village, floods roadways across state," May 1). If the residents of 26th Street or the citizens of Baltimore expect anything from the CSX Corporation, they are wasting their time. We have been fighting this railroad for nearly 25 years while the Thomas Viaduct across the Patapsco River continues to deteriorate.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
There's a reason people want to own or visit properties that back up to open spaces: Nature enhances lives. And that's why protecting and preserving the Patapsco Valley "is really all about quality of life," says John Slater, president of Patapsco Heritage Greenway, a 13-year-old organization dedicated to ensuring the valley's future. With an eye toward moving that mission forward, the group will host a public forum at 7 p.m. Monday. The event, "Envision the Valley," will be held at St. Augustine School in Elkridge and is a repeat of presentation of a consultant's final report given this week in Catonsville.
NEWS
By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2000
ELKRIDGE, LIKE many towns in Maryland, is a fusion of old and new. With origins dating to the 17th century, Elkridge is the oldest settlement in Howard County. However, the recent residential and commercial development boom has concealed much of that history from all but longtime residents and discerning observers. Last week, longtime Elkridge resident Helen Voris conducted an Elkridge heritage tour, pointing out historic sites in the community. Sponsored by the Elk Ridge Heritage Society, the tour began with a slide presentation at the Elkridge library branch - a building with a modern design that epitomizes the new Elkridge.
BUSINESS
By Mary Medland and Mary Medland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 23, 1998
Set in the shadow of the historic Thomas Viaduct, Lawyers Hill is, most likely, one of Baltimore's oldest suburbs.And today, the area located near Relay and Elkridge still resonates of the past. "We're trying to preserve this neighborhood as a way of life that is a little less hurried," said one longtime resident."The neighborhood has a candlelight tour every Christmas, and the tours still have the feel of an old-time get-together," said Ellicott City attorney David Thomas.One of the area's first residents was Judge George W. Dobbin, who visited the country setting in the early 1840s to find relief from his asthma.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
There's a reason people want to own or visit properties that back up to open spaces: Nature enhances lives. And that's why protecting and preserving the Patapsco Valley "is really all about quality of life," says John Slater, president of Patapsco Heritage Greenway, a 13-year-old organization dedicated to ensuring the valley's future. With an eye toward moving that mission forward, the group will host a public forum at 7 p.m. Monday. The event, "Envision the Valley," will be held at St. Augustine School in Elkridge and is a repeat of presentation of a consultant's final report given this week in Catonsville.
EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | August 2, 2011
100 Years Ago Woodbine Notes "Mrs. A.W. Hoffman of Baltimore is visiting relatives near here; Mrs. Eugene Trayer and children visited her sister, Mrs. Fleming, last week; Mrs. M.C. Mills spent one day last week with Mrs. Robert Pickett here; Mr. Howard W. Owings has returned to Woodbine, after spending a week with his parents Mr. and Mrs. Brian Owings of Middleton W. Va. " 75 Years Ago Step right up and tie...
EXPLORE
June 7, 2011
One thing has always been clear to the residents of Lawyers Hill, a historic neighborhood perched along a dramatic ridge of land where the state's tidewater basin leaps 300 feet to the Piedmont Plateau and sweeping views of the Patapsco River Valley are common. The world will change around them, even if they resist. The small Elkridge neighborhood, located at Interstate 95 just south of the Patapsco River, began in the 1840s as a summer retreat for prominent Baltimore families escaping the bustle of the city, who built ornate homes veiled by acres of woods.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2011
Howard County is often seen as a young, fast-growing suburb, but an annual list of the county's top 10 endangered historic sites compiled by the group Preservation Howard County tells another story. For Fred Dorsey, president of Preservation Howard County, that story began in 1642 when his ancestor, Edward Dorsey — known as "Edward the Immigrant" — arrived in Virginia from England. To escape persecution for his Quaker faith, that original Dorsey migrated north into Maryland, Fred Dorsey said, and ended up in what is now Howard County.
EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | August 2, 2011
100 Years Ago Woodbine Notes "Mrs. A.W. Hoffman of Baltimore is visiting relatives near here; Mrs. Eugene Trayer and children visited her sister, Mrs. Fleming, last week; Mrs. M.C. Mills spent one day last week with Mrs. Robert Pickett here; Mr. Howard W. Owings has returned to Woodbine, after spending a week with his parents Mr. and Mrs. Brian Owings of Middleton W. Va. " 75 Years Ago Step right up and tie...
EXPLORE
June 7, 2011
One thing has always been clear to the residents of Lawyers Hill, a historic neighborhood perched along a dramatic ridge of land where the state's tidewater basin leaps 300 feet to the Piedmont Plateau and sweeping views of the Patapsco River Valley are common. The world will change around them, even if they resist. The small Elkridge neighborhood, located at Interstate 95 just south of the Patapsco River, began in the 1840s as a summer retreat for prominent Baltimore families escaping the bustle of the city, who built ornate homes veiled by acres of woods.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2011
Howard County is often seen as a young, fast-growing suburb, but an annual list of the county's top 10 endangered historic sites compiled by the group Preservation Howard County tells another story. For Fred Dorsey, president of Preservation Howard County, that story began in 1642 when his ancestor, Edward Dorsey — known as "Edward the Immigrant" — arrived in Virginia from England. To escape persecution for his Quaker faith, that original Dorsey migrated north into Maryland, Fred Dorsey said, and ended up in what is now Howard County.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
A 3-D animated video that reveals centuries-old construction secrets might hold the key to jump-starting local interest in restoring a beloved bridge to its original majesty. The Friends of Patapsco Valley and Heritage Greenway, self-appointed caretakers of the river valley that was first settled in the 1690s, hope so. While the age of any historic structure is usually enough to whip up avid support for its preservation, the Thomas Viaduct has a lot more going for it than its impressive July 4, 1835, birthday.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
The stone bridge project left several laborers dead and injured, Patapsco River floods occasionally stopped the work and once a trestle collapsed, dropping granite loads into a millrace. The Thomas Viaduct was completed nonetheless and stands to this day, 174 years later - the country's oldest main line railroad span. Trains have gotten bigger, heavier and longer, but still they roll over the eight granite arches heading north and south with freight and MARC passengers, wheels squealing through the river valley.
NEWS
By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2000
ELKRIDGE, LIKE many towns in Maryland, is a fusion of old and new. With origins dating to the 17th century, Elkridge is the oldest settlement in Howard County. However, the recent residential and commercial development boom has concealed much of that history from all but longtime residents and discerning observers. Last week, longtime Elkridge resident Helen Voris conducted an Elkridge heritage tour, pointing out historic sites in the community. Sponsored by the Elk Ridge Heritage Society, the tour began with a slide presentation at the Elkridge library branch - a building with a modern design that epitomizes the new Elkridge.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
The stone bridge project left several laborers dead and injured, Patapsco River floods occasionally stopped the work and once a trestle collapsed, dropping granite loads into a millrace. The Thomas Viaduct was completed nonetheless and stands to this day, 174 years later - the country's oldest main line railroad span. Trains have gotten bigger, heavier and longer, but still they roll over the eight granite arches heading north and south with freight and MARC passengers, wheels squealing through the river valley.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | June 23, 1996
25 years ago (week of June 20-26, 1971):The Thomas Viaduct in Elkridge was declared a National Historic Landmark by the U.S. Department of the Interior.Plans were announced for the Institute for the Study of the Black Experience in Howard County under the sponsorship of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Institute volunteers planned to reconstruct the county's black heritage from church records and similar documentation, as well as from interviews with older county residents.
BUSINESS
By Mary Medland and Mary Medland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 23, 1998
Set in the shadow of the historic Thomas Viaduct, Lawyers Hill is, most likely, one of Baltimore's oldest suburbs.And today, the area located near Relay and Elkridge still resonates of the past. "We're trying to preserve this neighborhood as a way of life that is a little less hurried," said one longtime resident."The neighborhood has a candlelight tour every Christmas, and the tours still have the feel of an old-time get-together," said Ellicott City attorney David Thomas.One of the area's first residents was Judge George W. Dobbin, who visited the country setting in the early 1840s to find relief from his asthma.
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