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Thomas Penfield Jackson

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By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- When he drew the last great antitrust case of the 20th century, Thomas Penfield Jackson swore he wouldn't let United States vs. Microsoft become his legal Vietnam.He knew what happened to David Edelstein, the New York judge who postponed retirement in 1971 to take over a case against IBM that dragged on for 13 years.He knew what happened to Judge Harold Greene, who played baby sitter to a million documents during the Justice Department's eight-year assault on AT&T.Instead, the courtly 62-year-old Jackson whipped through the Microsoft case in just 76 trial days.
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NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- When he drew the last great antitrust case of the 20th century, Thomas Penfield Jackson swore he wouldn't let United States vs. Microsoft become his legal Vietnam.He knew what happened to David Edelstein, the New York judge who postponed retirement in 1971 to take over a case against IBM that dragged on for 13 years.He knew what happened to Judge Harold Greene, who played baby sitter to a million documents during the Justice Department's eight-year assault on AT&T.Instead, the courtly 62-year-old Jackson whipped through the Microsoft case in just 76 trial days.
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NEWS
February 10, 1994
Oklahoma Gov. David Walters, who pleaded guilty last year to violating campaign finance laws, narrowly avoided an impeachment inquiry when the Oklahoma House voted against the move."
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Barring a last-minute settlement, the Microsoft antitrust trial will enter the payoff phase, probably late this month, with the warring parties seeking to overcome weak spots in their initial arguments.The Justice Department and Microsoft Corp. each named three rebuttal witnesses yesterday. They will use those witnesses to try to gain the upper hand during the crucial period of the case, which promises to shape antitrust law in the high-technology field for the coming century.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Barring a last-minute settlement, the Microsoft antitrust trial will enter the payoff phase, probably late this month, with the warring parties seeking to overcome weak spots in their initial arguments.The Justice Department and Microsoft Corp. each named three rebuttal witnesses yesterday. They will use those witnesses to try to gain the upper hand during the crucial period of the case, which promises to shape antitrust law in the high-technology field for the coming century.
BUSINESS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 17, 2000
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department and 19 states told a federal appeals court yesterday that the Microsoft Corp. antitrust case could be headed for the Supreme Court next week, with all issues wrapped up in a single case. Rejecting a claim by the software company that the case will be split into two, with one in the appeals court even if the other goes on to the high court, prosecutors said they would follow a procedure to assure that just one appeal goes forward. Microsoft has asked the appeals court to block all parts of the order by U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson to break up the company and impose tight restrictions on its business behavior.
NEWS
November 6, 1999
A time line of events in the Microsoft case:Allegation1991: Federal Trade Commission investigates claims that Microsoft monopolizes personal computer operating system market1993: FTC drops case; Justice Department begins investigationSettlement1994: Microsoft and Justice Dept. reach settlement; Microsoft changes PC maker contracts, lifts restrictions on other software firmsFeb. 1995: Federal judge rejects settlement as an inadequate remedy to Microsoft "monopoly"'Bundling' investigation1996: Federal investigation of Microsoft's "bundling" its Internet browser with Windows 95Oct.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 12, 2000
WASHINGTON - Giving Microsoft Corp. a chance to mount a sweeping challenge to the court order that would break the company in two, a federal appeals court issued a lengthy schedule yesterday for reviewing the software company's antitrust appeal. Although Microsoft did not get all the time, or the allowed space in written briefs, that it had asked, the order by the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington was generous toward the company's requests. Instead of allowing it 60 days to prepare its primary brief, the court gave the company 52 days.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 15, 2000
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department and 19 states urged an appeals court yesterday to stay out of the Microsoft Corp. antitrust case until a federal judge decides whether to send it directly to the Supreme Court. The case has gone, at least temporarily, to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, the tribunal where Microsoft wants it to remain, expecting more sympathetic treatment there. If the case is shifted to the Supreme Court, the Justice Department and the states noted in a new filing, the appeals court will lose its authority to take any action on the case as long as it is before the Supreme Court.
NEWS
April 5, 2000
SHED NO TEARS for Bill Gates, now that a federal court has declared Microsoft a monopoly. Any punishment Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson conjures for the software giant will likely leave Mr. Gates richer or, at the very least, no worse off. The judge will have to find more creative solutions to help consumers damaged by Microsoft's practices. Mr. Gates is a little like Br'er Rabbit in this situation -- facing a penalty that might seem to anyone else like a joy. Break up Microsoft? Oh, no!
NEWS
February 10, 1994
Oklahoma Gov. David Walters, who pleaded guilty last year to violating campaign finance laws, narrowly avoided an impeachment inquiry when the Oklahoma House voted against the move."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Microsoft Corp. said yesterday that antitrust allegations against it by federal and state enforcers are unsupported by the evidence and should be thrown out by a federal judge.In a 48-page filing, Microsoft also said one of its biggest rivals -- Netscape Communications Corp. -- confirmed for the Justice Department that Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser is "seamlessly integrated" into Windows 98.Federal and state antitrust enforcers allege that Microsoft illegally tied these two separate products together to thwart competition from Netscape and other browsers.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Microsoft Corp. executive Paul Maritz denied yesterday at the software giant's antitrust trial a government lawyer's suggestion that the company rewrote the history of its business practices as its legal troubles mounted.Maritz was confronted with Microsoft e-mail written four months before the U.S. Justice Department and 19 states filed antitrust lawsuits last spring. The message ordered deletion of references to Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser as a separate product from its Windows 98 computer operating system.
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