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NEWS
October 15, 1991
Moscow joined the Third World at the annual meeting of the International Monetary Fund in Thailand this week, opening itself to scrutiny and financial discipline long imposed on less developed countries. Such a step downward for the leader of the Second World was not acknowledged, nor was it welcomed by endemically poor countries that fear their share in First World riches will diminish.Yet there was no denying that the collapse of the Soviet Union is at the top of the world economic agenda.
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | June 27, 2013
On the second night of the Phillips 66 National Championships at the Indiana University Natatorium in Indianapolis, several swimmers with local ties clinched spots in Barcelona, Spain, for next month's FINA World Aquatic Championships. Elizabeth Pelton, 19, a California sophomore from Towson, qualified for her third world championships on Wednesday after finishing second in the 200-meter backstroke behind the world-record holder, a future college teammate, Missy Franklin. Pelton's time of 2 minutes, 6.29 seconds topped her personal best by more than 1.2 seconds and is the second-fastest swim in the world this year.
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NEWS
By JOEL KOTKIN | January 7, 1993
Bill Clinton's obsession with America's First World rivals could lead him to mistakenly fight the last economic war when we need to prepare for the next.Although barely noted by the academics around the president-elect, the economic key to the 1990s may lie not in relations among the ''Triad'' competitors -- Japan, Western Europe and the U.S. -- but in adjusting to the inexorable economic rise of what used to be Third World countries. Last year, for example, overall growth in the developing nations neared 6 percent, three times the rate for the stumbling Triad.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
The tragic assassination attempt in Pakistan against 14-year-old student Malala Yousafzai, merely because she was a female who spoke out for women's education, is a disturbing reminder that there are still places in our world where an educated woman is considered a threat. More disturbing still is that it occurred in a nation which 24 years ago elected Benazir Bhutto as the first female prime minister of a Muslim country. It is a potent reminder that progress for women does not always proceed linearly.
FEATURES
By Edward J. Sozanski and Edward J. Sozanski,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- How different the world looks when we see it though the eyes of someone who doesn't share our biases, especially when that observer comes from beyond the orbit of the world's wealthy, industrialized nations. Much of the world lies outside that orbit, and thus fails to register in our social and political consciousness.How much of the world is that, actually? Well, judging by our mass media, most of Central and South America, almost all of Africa and substantial portions of Asia and Southeast Asia, violent revolutions excepted.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | July 5, 1991
London -- In the aftermath of the Gulf War, some clever people are arguing a silly point: that the worry about ballistic-missile development in the Third World is overstated.Yes, they say, they may indeed have them -- some countries like Saudi Arabia, Israel and India, with intercontinental range -- but they are so inaccurate, so prone to mislaunch, short on payload and, not least, totally unintegrated into any viable war-fighting scenario and strategy, that they are not much more than status symbols.
NEWS
By BEN BARBER | May 17, 1993
Washington. -- Thirty years ago, the invention of small-scale technologies such as portable electric-power generators and radio phones led to the dream of a planet in which people would consume less and waste less, sharing the earth's bounty under an ethic known as ''small is beautiful.''Solar cells would open pasture gates or irrigation channels; remote villages would be alerted to impending storms, pests or the changing market prices of their crops; television would bring primary and high school education where there were no roads or schools.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1994
For decades, the U.S. Agency for International Development has sent Americans into the Third World to attack the problems of developing countries: infant mortality and childhood illness, unplanned births and sexually transmitted diseases, poverty and chronic unemployment.Now AID wants to teach at home what it has learned abroad. In Baltimore and elsewhere, the agency wants to share remedies for the ills of urban America -- infant mortality and childhood illness, unplanned births and sexually transmitted diseases, poverty and chronic unemployment.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | December 16, 1993
FROM THE important but largely unsung elections in Venezuela, my respected colleague Andres Oppenheimer of the Miami Herald reported some surprising -- and extremely important -- findings.The election itself on Dec. 5 offered no surprises: Elderly but respected former president Rafael Caldera won. The reason was clear: The incumbent president, Carlos Andres Perez, was in disgrace over financial "irregularities." And the state itself, once the model for democracy in Latin America, had turned out in essence to be so centrally controlled by a few enriched politicians that it was on the verge of military coup or street upheaval.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | February 12, 1993
London. -- Every so often some intellectual writes a book or an essay that turns America's head.Rachel Carson did it in the 1950s with ''The Silent Spring'' that planted the first snowdrops of the environmental movement. John Kenneth Galbraith did it in the 1960s with ''The Affluent Society'' that first made modern-day Americans start to question naked capitalism. More recently Francis Fukuyama did it with ''The End of History.''Now, I think, Steven David, professor of political science at the John Hopkins University, might have done it with an essay deceptively entitled ''Why the Third World Still Matters.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 18, 2011
Dr. Ross Joseph Brechner, a mathematician turned ophthalmologist who abandoned private practice for a second career in public health, died Aug. 4 of heart disease at his Catonsville home. He was 71. "Ross was a fine ophthalmologist who changed careers late in life after being a highly trained epidemiologist. He was passionate about finding a better way to treat patients with a variety of diseases including blindness of the eyes," said Dr. Morton F. Goldberg, former director of the Wilmer Eye Institute and professor of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | August 2, 2011
Visitors to Baltimore not shepherded through on official tours or staying in the Inner Harbor see what members of the Society for International Development would describe as the Third World. The organization, whose members are luminaries of foreign aid, held its triennial meeting at the posh Omni Shoreham Hotel inWashington last weekend as debt ceiling battles were raging a couple miles away in the Capitol. It would have been better for the group to hold its meeting in Baltimore, as some of the suggestions aimed at bettering far-away places in Africa and Asia could have been picked up immediately here.
NEWS
January 28, 2011
There appear to be two ways (or maybe a melding of the two) to face up to Ron Smith's "brutal truth about entitlements" (Jan. 28). The first is to raise taxes, recognizing that, compared with the "first world" nations of Western Europe, ours are low, somewhere around 25 percent below the average of those countries. The second is to accept the fact that America is a capitalist country where we are all expected to be on our own and go ahead and make those painful cuts in Medicare.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 11, 2010
Carl E. Taylor, the founder of the academic discipline of international health at what is now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who devoted his life to the medical well-being of the world's marginalized people, died Feb. 4 at his Lake Roland-area home. He was 93. "Carl was a pioneer. He was quite special and a visionary," said Dr. Robert E. Black, who succeeded Dr. Taylor as chairman of the department. "He understood the concept of tropical medicine and the cross-cultural problems in developing countries," Dr. Black said.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 14, 2009
WASHINGTON - Them Jews aren't going to let President Obama talk to me." - the Rev. Jeremiah Wright "I hate gay people ..." - Tim Hardaway, former NBA star "A Third World country."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 24, 2008
NEW YORK - Bill Gates and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg announced yesterday that they will spend $500 million to stop people around the world from smoking. The World Health Organization estimates that tobacco will kill up to a billion people in the 21st century, most of them in poor and middle-income countries. In an effort to cut that number, Bloomberg's foundation plans to commit $250 million over four years on top of $125 million he announced two years ago. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is allocating $125 million over five years.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila | September 14, 1996
CENSUS FIGURES confirm what we already knew: With increasing numbers of African Americans joining the decades-old white middle-class flight to the surrounding counties, Baltimore is rapidly becoming a city of even starker contrasts between overwhelming poverty and isolated islands of wealth.I lived in Africa for three years, followed by five in the Soviet Union. Recently, I have been startled to see how rapidly Baltimore is acquiring some lifestyle features of underdeveloped Third World countries.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 25, 1991
UNITED NATIONS -- A cold silence was all the General Assembly delegates had to offer Monday as President Bush called for the repeal of one of their most provocative votes: the 1975 resolution equating Zionism with racism.Beneath the silence, there may also have been a tinge of nostalgia for the heady pinnacle of Third World defiance of both the United States and its irksome ally, Israel.For the president's decision to issue the challenge demonstrated more than confidence that he could win that issue.
FEATURES
By Ann Powers | August 23, 2007
Mya Arulpragasam has a habit of scrunching up her mouth. In photographs, she often pulls her purple- or orange-painted lips into a hard-core rapper's sneer - or a punk's, a bit of old Sid Vicious creeping into the visage of this 30-year-old, London-born, frequently displaced daughter of Sri Lanka. It's not a pretty girl's look. Her voice, at the center of her continent-hopping, avant-garde, beat-happy songs, emerges from that wry face. It's not always easy to take or, for some, to take seriously.
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