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By Scott McLemee and Scott McLemee,Newsday | March 14, 2004
The Coming of the Third Reich, by Richard J. Evans. Penguin Press. 622 pages. $34.95. In cynical moments, it sometimes appears that the first law of commercial nonfiction book-publishing runs: "If you put Nazis in it, they will come." After more than half a century, the Third Reich retains its extraordinary hold on the public imagination. Its only rival, at least in America, is the Civil War. (One historian I know jokes that if he could find a way to get both into one book, he might be able to retire.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
Watching "Eichmann" on Holocaust Remembrance Day in the Baltimore Jewish Film Festival will remind viewers of the power movies can get from timing and circumstance. It's not a crackerjack film, but it's a strong conversation-starter. (Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin will be the guest speaker.) It centers on an Israeli police interrogator, Capt. Avner Less, who relentlessly questioned Adolph Eichmann, a prime engineer of Hitler's Final Solution, from May 29, 1960 (shortly after Eichmann's capture in a Buenos Aires suburb)
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By New York Times News Service | May 10, 2007
MOSCOW -- President Vladimir V. Putin obliquely compared the foreign policy of the United States to the Third Reich in a speech yesterday commemorating the 62nd anniversary of the defeat of Nazi Germany, apparently in an escalation of anti-American rhetoric within the Russian government. The comments were the latest in a series of sharply worded Russian criticisms of U.S. policy on Iraq, missile defense, NATO expansion and, more broadly, U.S. unilateralism in foreign affairs. Many Russians say the sharper edge reflects a frustration that Russia's views, in particular opposition to NATO expansion, have been ignored in the West.
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By New York Times News Service | May 10, 2007
MOSCOW -- President Vladimir V. Putin obliquely compared the foreign policy of the United States to the Third Reich in a speech yesterday commemorating the 62nd anniversary of the defeat of Nazi Germany, apparently in an escalation of anti-American rhetoric within the Russian government. The comments were the latest in a series of sharply worded Russian criticisms of U.S. policy on Iraq, missile defense, NATO expansion and, more broadly, U.S. unilateralism in foreign affairs. Many Russians say the sharper edge reflects a frustration that Russia's views, in particular opposition to NATO expansion, have been ignored in the West.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1998
After World War II, Holocaust survivors and relatives of victims pressed insurance claims against German and Italian companies, which denied many of them because the claimants lacked death certificates, policy numbers or other documentation.But now researchers have recovered from government and private archives documents that strengthen those claims and show how the top executives of the biggest German insurance company, Allianz AG, worked closely with the Third Reich to seize policies owned by Jews, to expand Allianz's business in conquered countries and to limit claims from riots the Nazis orchestrated to destroy Jews' property.
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By Los Angeles Times | September 10, 1992
AROLSEN, Germany -- It was the red snow that haunted her, that made her think of Lucy. Of Lucy, and of Auschwitz.Friends and family kept telling Renee Duering that she was living in the past, that she should try to forget what happened so long ago. She had survived the Holocaust. She has a nice home near San Francisco, a decent life, two grandsons.But there was an emptiness in Ms. Duering, an aching void Lucy left behind. She had never had a friendship that meant so much. "I had to find her," Ms. Duering explained simply.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 1, 1996
When Hitler had his office in the Reich Chancellery decorated in 1939, the art placed in it played a significant role. Representations of Bismarck, Frederick the Great and former President von Hindenburg suggested that the current leader was the heir of a distinguished lineage. A school of Rubens painting, "Hercules and Omphale," referred both to classical times and to a great hero. Angelica Kauffmann's painting "Hermann's Return from the Battle of the Teutoburger Forest" recorded a German victory over the Romans.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 12, 2000
"I know that a single performance of a great masterpiece was a stronger and more vital negation of the spirit of Buchenwald and Auschwitz than words," the character of conductor Wilhelm Furtwangler says in Ronald Harwood's 1995 play "Taking Sides." "Human beings are free wherever Wagner and Beethoven are played. Music transported them to regions where torturers and murderers could do them no harm." Depending on your personal view of history and music, those words will either persuade you with their eloquence, or offend you with their self-justifying logic.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 15, 2000
"Nuremberg," a four-hour film about the trial of 22 Nazi war criminals at Nuremberg after World War II, is the kind of made-for-TV movie the broadcast networks rarely make anymore - a historical work of social conscience with a rock-ribbed moral center. And they should be ashamed. Lucky for us, cable television channels such as HBO and TNT have stepped in to fill the void. And they should be commended. "Nuremberg," which premieres tomorrow night on TNT, is one of the more important made-for-TV movie events of the year.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 17, 1996
LONDON -- David Irving may now be the world's most reviled historian.Banned from Germany and pilloried in the United States, the British-born Irving remains unrepentant. He clings to a revisionist view of the Third Reich that has earned him scorn as a "a Nazi apologist" and "Hitler's PR man.""I've been called Britain's most disliked historian," he says. "I can live with that. Is it an historian's job to be liked? It's not your job to be liked. Churchill said the historian's job is to find out what happened and why. Very good description."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN BOOK EDITOR | February 26, 2006
Witnesses of War: Children's Lives Under the Nazis Nicholas Stargardt Alfred A. Knopf / 512 pages / $30 With Germany's defeat a foregone conclusion in the last months of World War II, Adolf Hitler nonetheless chose to hurl the nation's last human resource into the maw of destruction. He ordered teenage boys into combat and to senseless deaths. It was a final exhibition of the Third Reich's ultimate nihilism. At the end, nothing mattered beyond fanaticism itself. "Now, the very youth in whose name the Nazi regime pursued its utopian vision was to be sacrificed for its defense," Australian historian Nicholas Stargardt writes in Witnesses of War, his monumental, penetrating exploration of the lives of children who came under Nazi rule.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott McLemee and Scott McLemee,Newsday | March 14, 2004
The Coming of the Third Reich, by Richard J. Evans. Penguin Press. 622 pages. $34.95. In cynical moments, it sometimes appears that the first law of commercial nonfiction book-publishing runs: "If you put Nazis in it, they will come." After more than half a century, the Third Reich retains its extraordinary hold on the public imagination. Its only rival, at least in America, is the Civil War. (One historian I know jokes that if he could find a way to get both into one book, he might be able to retire.
FEATURES
By Alan Riding and Alan Riding,NEW YORK TIMES | September 10, 2003
Leni Riefenstahl, the German filmmaker whose daringly innovative documentaries about a Nazi rally in Nuremberg in 1934 and the Berlin Olympics of 1936 earned her both acclaim as a cinematic genius and contempt as a propagandist for Hitler, died Monday night at her home in Poecking, south of Munich. She was 101. After the defeat of Germany in 1945, Riefenstahl was pronounced a Nazi sympathizer by the Allies and never again found work as a movie director. But such was the influence of her revolutionary film techniques on subsequent generations of documentary makers that the debate over whether her talent could be separated from her prewar political views continued unabated until her death.
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2002
WASHINGTON - At the end of World War II, advancing Allied armies freed tens of thousands of wraiths still breathing in Nazi camps. Jewish survivors were liberated. So were Gypsies and clerical opponents of the regime. Communists, too. But not homosexuals. After the war, an unknown number of men in Nazi concentration camps because of homosexuality were required to serve out sentences by the Allied Military government. They were not considered the victims of tyranny. They were criminals.
NEWS
March 11, 2001
Talk on German industry and Holocaust scheduled Holocaust historian Peter Hayes will present "German Industry and the Holocaust" at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday in McDaniel Lounge at Western Maryland College. The free public lecture is part of a spring semester course on Germany's Third Reich. Hayes, professor of history at Northwestern University, specializes in Germany in the 20th century and has written and edited four books, including a prize-winning study of the IG Farben Corp. during the Nazi era. The 1997-1998 Shapiro Senior Scholar-in-Residence at the U.S. Holocaust Museum, he is working on "Profits and Persecution: German Big Business and the Holocaust," and "Degussa in the Third Reich."
TOPIC
By Edwin Black | February 25, 2001
SOCIETY TYPICALLY consigns the writing of history to historians. The reporting of history is the duty of journalists. But can history be written by journalists? It can, as has been proved again and again. William Shirer, the Berlin correspondent of Columbia Broadcasting, wrote "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich," which has stood the test of time as arguably the best chronicle of Hitler's regime. James Toland did it with his monumental study "Hitler." Many others have used their journalistic skills to capture and portray the historical record.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 1997
BONN, Germany -- Still reeling from charges that it helped prolong World War II through financial dealings with the Third Reich, Switzerland faced newly published accusations yesterday that its wartime arms industry profited from -- and favored -- Hitler's Germany in a weapons trade worth millions of dollars.The disclosure will heap further discredit on a nation that cast itself as a wartime neutral but whose actions are seen increasingly, both by outsiders and some Swiss, as those of a power that collaborated broadly with Nazi Germany under the cloak of that neutrality.
FEATURES
April 5, 1996
St. Martin's Press has dropped plans to publish in America a biography of Hitler's propaganda chief, Joseph Goebbels, branding the book an anti-Semitic, "insidious piece of Goebbels-like propaganda.""There's no worse way to compound a mistake than by not admitting it and not correcting it if you can," said Thomas J. McCormack, chairman of the publishing house."Goebbels: Mastermind of the Third Reich" -- which is already out in England -- was written by David Irving, a British author who contends among other things that Hitler did not know Jews were being exterminated and that there's no proof gas chambers at Auschwitz were used to kill Jews.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 23, 2001
"Into the Arms of Strangers," an Oscar-nominated documentary on British efforts to rescue German and other children targeted by the Third Reich, is this weekend's Cinema Sundays offering. Director Mark Jonathan Harris' film looks at the Kindertransport, a rescue effort that saved more than 10,000 children from the Nazi concentration camps. Transported to Britain, the children were placed in foster homes or hostels, with the idea that they would be reunited with their families at war's end. For most, the war ended with no family left to return to. One of those children was the mother of "Into the Arms of Strangers" producer Deborah Oppenheimer.
TOPIC
By Ernest F. Imhoff | December 31, 2000
IT IS JUST A SMALL family irony, but interesting. The death Dec. 6 of Werner Klemperer, 80, a star in the comedy TV show "Hogan's Heroes," refocused attention on an old controversy over the propriety of deriving humor from a Nazi prisoner-of-war camp, picturing it as a wacky place where fictional bumbling German officers were outwitted each week by their clever American captives. Klemperer played the Nazi prison commander and chief buffoon, Col. Wilhelm Klink. The show ran from 1965 to 1971 and is now seen in reruns.
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