Advertisement
HomeCollectionsThings In Life
IN THE NEWS

Things In Life

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Robin Stratton | September 8, 1992
we only know the least important things in life the rest we believe
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | September 25, 2005
The best things in life may be free, but don't be so quick to discount what money can buy. Before anyone starts howling, consider this an appreciation for all the things that we, as consummate consumers, have bought over the years that tickled us in some way. Good salespeople know we don't just spend out of need, but that we also spend purely to fulfill some emotion. More often than not and right or wrong, we spend to feel good. Whether it's derived from something big or small, ridiculously expensive or gratifyingly cheap matters not. It's only pertinent that the object brought a smile to our face, triggered some sort of fuzzy feel-good memory or made life easier somehow.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1998
Steve Little began boxing professionally at 18 as a four-round fighter. He enjoyed a brief taste of glory as super middleweight champion in 1994 after upsetting Michael Nunn, but is now back to scuffling in the same intimate fight clubs where he began his career 15 years ago.But Little, now 33 and unranked in the cruiserweight class, knows exactly why he is still fighting and headlining the card at Martin's West in Woodlawn on Tuesday night in an eight-rounder against...
FEATURES
By Paul Horsley and Paul Horsley,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 3, 2003
Kitty Carlisle Hart hasn't had what you'd call a career, exactly. She's had half a dozen. The New Orleans-born singer-actress starred on the Broadway stage when George Gershwin, Jerome Kern and Cole Porter were just the best of dozens of Tin Pan Alley masters. She played opposite Groucho Marx in A Night at the Opera and Bing Crosby in She Loves Me Not, then a half-century later appeared in Radio Days and Six Degrees of Separation. She had a minor operatic career, performing in Britten's The Rape of Lucretia and portraying Prince Orlofsky at the Metropolitan Opera's Die Fledermaus in 1967.
NEWS
October 3, 1990
Persian Gulf duty is not'just a jobRussell Baker's pen misfired in his Sept. 24 column. Despite the elegance of his prose, he missed the essence of what always has been the strength of America's fighting men and women: a dedication to principle that transcends dollars and cents and fringe benefits; ideals that are clearly worth the family separations and sacrifices even when it means serving in the deserts of the Middle East, the barren plateaus of Korea...
BUSINESS
March 30, 1997
Pricey moderation: Despite economists' concerns, inflation has been moderate for some time -- even for some of the pricier things in life. The people who make Moet & Chandon champagne looked at the cost of several high-priced items and found they were generally stable in 1996. A pound of Teuscher chocolate truffles was $49, the same as in 1995. A Rolex watch that cost $15,900 in 1995 remained at that price.No funny business: If potential customers and clients don't leave messages on your answering machine, maybe it's because you don't sound so hot. That's the suggestion of Home Office Computing magazine, which says to forget trying to be funny or cute, unless it fits the image you're trying to project.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | April 19, 1992
Karen Colvin's disability enabled her to tap her greatest 0) talentBy age 14, Karen Colvin knew she wanted to help the handicapped. She didn't know, however, she would wind up a member of the group she was helping."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1998
Baltimore businessman Tim Mackie survived the 13th annual Marathon des Sables and was in his office at Prudential Insurance Company yesterday, wiser, thinner and with one blistered foot.Mackie finished the six-day, 150-mile Sahara desert run in 56 hours, 18 minutes and 52 seconds last Saturday, to place 385th among 432 runners who finished. Sixty-nine runners did not finish, including Bryant McKinley, Mackie's blind teammate who was part of the World T.E.A.M. Sports entry.The winner, Mohame Ahansal, completed the course in 16: 22.29.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | April 10, 1997
Where to find the Finer ThingsThe Finer Things in Life Cafe (10921 York Road, 410-329-1391) is Hunt Valley's best-kept restaurant secret. (Some would argue that the Hunt Valley Szechuan is. But that's another story.) Even though the cafe has been open since January, I only heard about it recently. The Finer Things has seating for only 18 people, takes no credit cards and is BYOB, but people are lining up for owner Donald Fisher's duck and pear salad, shrimp in lobster garlic sauce and emu Milanaise.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON DDTCCO: ROGER SIMON | June 2, 1991
BOSTON -- By 1988, the average television viewer in America had the set on for six hours and 59 minutes each day.That's quite a lot considering we use part of each day for non-essential things like eating and sleeping and brushing our teeth.In a single week, the average viewer sees about 1,000 TV commercials. And this, I always figured, is how television sells us things.But I was only partially correct. As I learned from listening recently to George Gerbner, dean of the Annenberg School of Communications at the University of Pennsylvania, television sells us things much more profound than products and in a much more powerful and subtle way than through commercials.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1998
Steve Little began boxing professionally at 18 as a four-round fighter. He enjoyed a brief taste of glory as super middleweight champion in 1994 after upsetting Michael Nunn, but is now back to scuffling in the same intimate fight clubs where he began his career 15 years ago.But Little, now 33 and unranked in the cruiserweight class, knows exactly why he is still fighting and headlining the card at Martin's West in Woodlawn on Tuesday night in an eight-rounder against...
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1998
Baltimore businessman Tim Mackie survived the 13th annual Marathon des Sables and was in his office at Prudential Insurance Company yesterday, wiser, thinner and with one blistered foot.Mackie finished the six-day, 150-mile Sahara desert run in 56 hours, 18 minutes and 52 seconds last Saturday, to place 385th among 432 runners who finished. Sixty-nine runners did not finish, including Bryant McKinley, Mackie's blind teammate who was part of the World T.E.A.M. Sports entry.The winner, Mohame Ahansal, completed the course in 16: 22.29.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | May 4, 1997
The friend who first told me about the Finer Things in Life Cafe also brought me a copy of the menu. It was a lovely menu, befitting a cafe that takes no credit cards and is BYOB. Everything was under $10. Half the menu consisted of appealing sandwiches, like sliced chicken and roasted vegetables on sourdough with tarragon-shallot mayonnaise. The other half was interesting salads and "samplers," which included everything from a fruit and cheese plate to shrimp and goat-cheese pizza.So off I went, planning to meet a couple of friends there for dinner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | April 10, 1997
Where to find the Finer ThingsThe Finer Things in Life Cafe (10921 York Road, 410-329-1391) is Hunt Valley's best-kept restaurant secret. (Some would argue that the Hunt Valley Szechuan is. But that's another story.) Even though the cafe has been open since January, I only heard about it recently. The Finer Things has seating for only 18 people, takes no credit cards and is BYOB, but people are lining up for owner Donald Fisher's duck and pear salad, shrimp in lobster garlic sauce and emu Milanaise.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1997
Pricey moderation: Despite economists' concerns, inflation has been moderate for some time -- even for some of the pricier things in life. The people who make Moet & Chandon champagne looked at the cost of several high-priced items and found they were generally stable in 1996. A pound of Teuscher chocolate truffles was $49, the same as in 1995. A Rolex watch that cost $15,900 in 1995 remained at that price.No funny business: If potential customers and clients don't leave messages on your answering machine, maybe it's because you don't sound so hot. That's the suggestion of Home Office Computing magazine, which says to forget trying to be funny or cute, unless it fits the image you're trying to project.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 13, 1996
EMILY LUCHETTI has little tolerance for people who disdain dessert. When people come to her with their heads held high and announce that they don't eat sugar anymore, she responds by asking these naysayers how long they have had this problem and have they considered seeking help.Enjoying a well-made dessert, she said, is like buying a new pair of shoes. It is a wonderful part of life, something you don't do everyday. "You don't eat dessert all the time," she said. "And you can't afford to buy all the shoes in the store."
SPORTS
By Ron Rapoport and Ron Rapoport,Los Angeles Daily News | December 30, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Magic got sick. Lonnie lost sight of the ball. Schottzie died.So tell me. How was your year?There is one good thing to be said about 1991, I suppose. It's over. Would somebody please slam the door? It might decide to come back.Is it sports or is it us? They are supposed to be a diversion, after all. So why is it so hard to find things that aren't ultimately as depressing as the latest unemployment figures?Nothing seems to work any more. Nothing lasts. Victories turn sour in an instant.
NEWS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | September 25, 2005
The best things in life may be free, but don't be so quick to discount what money can buy. Before anyone starts howling, consider this an appreciation for all the things that we, as consummate consumers, have bought over the years that tickled us in some way. Good salespeople know we don't just spend out of need, but that we also spend purely to fulfill some emotion. More often than not and right or wrong, we spend to feel good. Whether it's derived from something big or small, ridiculously expensive or gratifyingly cheap matters not. It's only pertinent that the object brought a smile to our face, triggered some sort of fuzzy feel-good memory or made life easier somehow.
NEWS
By Robin Stratton | September 8, 1992
we only know the least important things in life the rest we believe
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.