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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | August 5, 1994
In staging "A Midsummer Night's Dream" at the Cloisters Amphitheater as its inaugural production, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival has chosen the Shakespearean play best suited to being performed outdoors on a summer night. And the fledgling theater company is taking full advantage of its open-air venue -- on the evening I attended, even a brief rain shower failed to interrupt the action on stage.But above and beyond the lovely, appropriate setting, the most interesting aspect of this solid production is that it isn't merely a light romp in the woods, as the play is often interpreted.
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By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 2005
Shakespeare wrote A Midsummer Night's Dream as a fun show for audiences in 1595. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, staging the play outdoors in the ruins of Patapsco Female Institute in Ellicott City, proves it can still be fun 410 years later. It is a situation comedy about romantic mix-ups. Lysander and Demetrius are both in love with Hermia. She loves Lysander, but her father wants her to marry Demetrius. A young woman named Helena is mad for Demetrius, but he has no interest in her. Hermia appeals to the local duke, Theseus.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 10, 1997
With its quartet of amorous couples and woodland setting replete with fairies, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is not only one of Shakespeare's most lavish romantic comedies, but one that offers a wealth of opportunities for an imaginative director and designers.Center Stage's season-opening production takes full advantage and delivers a fanciful, visually lush interpretation that reinforces the theme of the mysteries and blindness of true love, whose course never does run smooth.The visual opulence begins with designer Tony Straiges' set, which resembles a gigantic, two-level gilded bird cage surrounded by topiaries that float up magically, as if in a Magritte painting, when Puck arrives.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 25, 2002
The Maryland Stage Company's production of Shakespeare's magical A Midsummer Night's Dream is a mixed bag of tricks. Love is a difficult and sometimes dark struggle in director Xerxes Mehta's interpretation. One of the leads is seriously miscast, and there's far too much yelling for this ethereal comedy to truly work its spell. But most of the acting is just fine, and Mehta uses some effective (if not especially original) double casting to reinforce one of the play's major themes - the notion that love is blind.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Beginning with its very title, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is the ultimate surrealistic Shakespeare play.So it's fitting that the design of the Royal Shakespeare Company's magical production at Kennedy Center, on its way to Broadway, is a homage to the great surrealist painter Rene Magritte.Umbrellas -- a favorite Magritte motif -- are a major feature of Anthony Ward's design. Against a deep blue background, Puck makes his entrance holding onto an umbrella that floats down to the stage, and the bed of Titania, the fairy queen, is a giant, upturned fuchsia umbrella, padded with matching velvet cushions.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
Never has professional football seemed so distant or foreign as in the grand, marbled lobby of the Maryland Institute, College of Art, where students sit cross-legged or sprawled out on the floor to sketch the larger-than-life Grecian statues in residence. One couldn't feel farther from a sports bar or sports talk radio. Here, students study the shadows and light in such works as "Theseus: From the Parthenon." Their drawings attempt to capture classic human form in these monuments to strength, grace and beauty.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 16, 1999
You don't expect reverential treatment from a director whose best-known Shakespeare production is a four-man interpretation of "Romeo and Juliet." In contrast to that stripped-down, off-Broadway hit, Washington's Shakespeare Theatre has allowed director Joe Calarco to pull out all the stops in his adaptation of "A Midsummer Night's Dream."The results, while intriguing, are mixed. What Calarco has created on designer Michael Fagin's boldly skewed set is more of a "Midwinter Night's Nightmare" -- an impression not entirely as negative as it might sound.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 2005
Shakespeare wrote A Midsummer Night's Dream as a fun show for audiences in 1595. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, staging the play outdoors in the ruins of Patapsco Female Institute in Ellicott City, proves it can still be fun 410 years later. It is a situation comedy about romantic mix-ups. Lysander and Demetrius are both in love with Hermia. She loves Lysander, but her father wants her to marry Demetrius. A young woman named Helena is mad for Demetrius, but he has no interest in her. Hermia appeals to the local duke, Theseus.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 25, 2002
The Maryland Stage Company's production of Shakespeare's magical A Midsummer Night's Dream is a mixed bag of tricks. Love is a difficult and sometimes dark struggle in director Xerxes Mehta's interpretation. One of the leads is seriously miscast, and there's far too much yelling for this ethereal comedy to truly work its spell. But most of the acting is just fine, and Mehta uses some effective (if not especially original) double casting to reinforce one of the play's major themes - the notion that love is blind.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2002
After a two-season hiatus, the Maryland Stage Company - the professional company in residence at the University of Maryland Baltimore County - is back performing for its home audience. Director Xerxes Mehta's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream, Shakespeare's comedy about the amorous adventures of humans and fairies, begins performances at Center Stage's Pearlstone Theater Tuesday. The cast is headed by Wendy Salkind in the double roles of Hippolyta and Titania, Scott Sedar as Oberon and Theseus, Bill Largess as Egeus and Peter Quince, and Dan Manning as Bottom.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
Never has professional football seemed so distant or foreign as in the grand, marbled lobby of the Maryland Institute, College of Art, where students sit cross-legged or sprawled out on the floor to sketch the larger-than-life Grecian statues in residence. One couldn't feel farther from a sports bar or sports talk radio. Here, students study the shadows and light in such works as "Theseus: From the Parthenon." Their drawings attempt to capture classic human form in these monuments to strength, grace and beauty.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 16, 1999
You don't expect reverential treatment from a director whose best-known Shakespeare production is a four-man interpretation of "Romeo and Juliet." In contrast to that stripped-down, off-Broadway hit, Washington's Shakespeare Theatre has allowed director Joe Calarco to pull out all the stops in his adaptation of "A Midsummer Night's Dream."The results, while intriguing, are mixed. What Calarco has created on designer Michael Fagin's boldly skewed set is more of a "Midwinter Night's Nightmare" -- an impression not entirely as negative as it might sound.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 10, 1997
With its quartet of amorous couples and woodland setting replete with fairies, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is not only one of Shakespeare's most lavish romantic comedies, but one that offers a wealth of opportunities for an imaginative director and designers.Center Stage's season-opening production takes full advantage and delivers a fanciful, visually lush interpretation that reinforces the theme of the mysteries and blindness of true love, whose course never does run smooth.The visual opulence begins with designer Tony Straiges' set, which resembles a gigantic, two-level gilded bird cage surrounded by topiaries that float up magically, as if in a Magritte painting, when Puck arrives.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Beginning with its very title, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is the ultimate surrealistic Shakespeare play.So it's fitting that the design of the Royal Shakespeare Company's magical production at Kennedy Center, on its way to Broadway, is a homage to the great surrealist painter Rene Magritte.Umbrellas -- a favorite Magritte motif -- are a major feature of Anthony Ward's design. Against a deep blue background, Puck makes his entrance holding onto an umbrella that floats down to the stage, and the bed of Titania, the fairy queen, is a giant, upturned fuchsia umbrella, padded with matching velvet cushions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | August 5, 1994
In staging "A Midsummer Night's Dream" at the Cloisters Amphitheater as its inaugural production, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival has chosen the Shakespearean play best suited to being performed outdoors on a summer night. And the fledgling theater company is taking full advantage of its open-air venue -- on the evening I attended, even a brief rain shower failed to interrupt the action on stage.But above and beyond the lovely, appropriate setting, the most interesting aspect of this solid production is that it isn't merely a light romp in the woods, as the play is often interpreted.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 1998
If New Yorkers get their Shakespeare in the Park, why shouldn't Annapolitans partake of the Bard in the garden?In the Summer Garden, that is, for thanks to the venerable Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre, Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is being presented through July at the outdoor theater across from the City Dock."
NEWS
April 18, 2001
ABOUT THIE SECTION: Reading by 9 is a project aimed at helping Baltimore-area students learn to read well by third grade. This section will offer advice, resources and stories designed to help parents and children have fun reading together. 4Kids: Featured site of the month THIS HOUSE IS FOR THE BIRDS Spring is here. Flowers are blooming and birds have returned, so it's time to dust off the binoculars and start bird-watching again. What better way than to build a birdhouse? The Birdhouse Network at http: / / birds.
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