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By KEVIN COWHERD | June 9, 2005
AND SO it begins again, the age-old struggle, the eternal battle of wills, the epic clash between testosterone and estrogen that plays out at the thermostat every day. Oh, I've written about this before - not that it's done any good. The basic problem is this: I like the house cold. My wife likes it to feel like Fallujah in July. So all summer long, we sneak back and forth to the thermostat to further our own shabby little agendas. I turn the air-conditioning down so the house is nice and cool.
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NEWS
July 26, 2011
My husband and I have taken part in BGE's PeakRewards program for three years and never experienced an interruption of our air-conditioning until Friday. At first we thought that our thermostat was faulty or the air-conditioner wasn't working. The unit had been off for more than an hour. The thermostat was set at 78 degrees, and it was registering 88 in the room. Then my sister-in-law called to say her air-conditioning wasn't working either. That's when I realized perhaps BGE had put PeakRewards into effect.
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BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2006
Robert L. Tiedemann III Heating and air conditioning service technician Dynastics Inc., Lansdowne Salary --$15.13 an hour Age --23 Years in the industry --Five How he got started --When he was 18, he started working in the air-conditioning and heating service and repair field for a contractor. Tiedemann decided to go to school in September to better learn his trade. He is now a first-year apprentice with the United Association of Plumbers and Steamfitters Local 486 Training School in Rosedale.
NEWS
July 8, 2010
I attended the Reservoir Hill Improvement Council community meeting at the J.E. Howard Recreation Center this past Tuesday and although the discussion was heated, I felt a chill in the air, almost to the point of shivering. I had a long sleeve top on and the temperature had reached a sweltering 105 degrees so I thought maybe I wasn't used to air conditioning. On my way out I noticed that the thermostat was set at 68 degrees, which is what I set my thermostat on when I am home. Then I realized I don't have central air in my house and the minimum temperature recommended for air conditioning is 78 degrees.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2004
The thermostat dance has already started in Chrissy Hester's Upper Fells Point rowhouse. It began with the drizzly rain, when the daytime weather dipped into the 50s and the chill in the night hovered in the 40s. It started getting harder to come out from under the cozy, toasty covers in the morning. And it stayed that cold for the next two weeks. It was time. She turned the heat on. She set the thermostat at 68 degrees in her three-story home. But then her husband snuck up later and turned it down.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2001
The blast of wintry air last week reminded me that it's not uncommon for people to get confused about their heating system. Questions range from: Does my house have a heat pump or just a furnace? How come the only time my heat pump blows nice hot air is when the blue light is on? Why does our new house seem colder than our old house even though both thermostats were set at 66 degrees? My answer: Did you ever think that maybe your thermostat is wrong? For a quick fix, try adjusting it to whatever setting keeps you comfortable, then lower it a degree at a time until you can just barely stand it. That's where you should leave it if you want to save fuel.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | October 26, 2007
Sara Childs set the thermostat in her Forest Hill sunroom to 75. "After a while, I was too warm, so I checked the thermostat." It was set on "heat" so, she selected "cool," and soon it was comfortable. But she was puzzled: "Shouldn't 75 degrees be 75 degrees, hot or cold?" It is. But October sunshine warmed the room to more than 75. Your heater can only heat, so it shut off. By selecting "cool," you switched on the AC to cool the room back to 75.
NEWS
July 26, 2011
My husband and I have taken part in BGE's PeakRewards program for three years and never experienced an interruption of our air-conditioning until Friday. At first we thought that our thermostat was faulty or the air-conditioner wasn't working. The unit had been off for more than an hour. The thermostat was set at 78 degrees, and it was registering 88 in the room. Then my sister-in-law called to say her air-conditioning wasn't working either. That's when I realized perhaps BGE had put PeakRewards into effect.
NEWS
July 8, 2010
I attended the Reservoir Hill Improvement Council community meeting at the J.E. Howard Recreation Center this past Tuesday and although the discussion was heated, I felt a chill in the air, almost to the point of shivering. I had a long sleeve top on and the temperature had reached a sweltering 105 degrees so I thought maybe I wasn't used to air conditioning. On my way out I noticed that the thermostat was set at 68 degrees, which is what I set my thermostat on when I am home. Then I realized I don't have central air in my house and the minimum temperature recommended for air conditioning is 78 degrees.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | January 21, 2001
There must be some variation of Murphy's Law that goes: Skyrocketing oil and gas prices will cause the average temperature of a winter's day to drop 10 degrees. It's cold outside and heating bills are soaring, so a few money-saving measures are definitely in order. What should we do? As Tim Jahnigen of Baltimore Gas & Electric puts it, "Lifestyle choices will determine how much you pay at the end of the month." Start with the easy ones. No-brainers: Put on a sweater and turn the thermostat down.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | October 26, 2007
Sara Childs set the thermostat in her Forest Hill sunroom to 75. "After a while, I was too warm, so I checked the thermostat." It was set on "heat" so, she selected "cool," and soon it was comfortable. But she was puzzled: "Shouldn't 75 degrees be 75 degrees, hot or cold?" It is. But October sunshine warmed the room to more than 75. Your heater can only heat, so it shut off. By selecting "cool," you switched on the AC to cool the room back to 75.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUn Columnist | March 19, 2007
Recently my wife and I decided we hadn't taken on enough debt with just a mortgage, car loan and college loan, so we replaced the old heating and air-conditioning system in our home with a brand new system. The new system costs an obscene amount of money. Oh, but don't worry about us. We can certainly swing it, especially if I pick up a second and third job somewhere, maybe at Wegman's or someplace like that. Anyway, I'd like to be able to report that we're enjoying the new heating and air-conditioning system, except that wouldn't be true, because we're afraid to touch the new thermostat.
SPORTS
July 19, 2006
Is it just too hot for you to enjoy your favorite sports? It's very physically draining. Last evening I had to get up from my sofa and turn the thermostat back on the air conditioner, turn the oscillating fan on and refill my iced tea before I could sit down to watch a baseball game. Patrick R. Lynch Baltimore NEXT QUESTION Do you expect the Orioles to make any deals before the waiver deadline? Selected responses to today's question will be printed tomorrow on The Kickoff page. Please e-mail your answer (about 25 words)
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2006
Robert L. Tiedemann III Heating and air conditioning service technician Dynastics Inc., Lansdowne Salary --$15.13 an hour Age --23 Years in the industry --Five How he got started --When he was 18, he started working in the air-conditioning and heating service and repair field for a contractor. Tiedemann decided to go to school in September to better learn his trade. He is now a first-year apprentice with the United Association of Plumbers and Steamfitters Local 486 Training School in Rosedale.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | January 5, 2006
With home heating costs going through the roof this winter, I've taken a number of common-sense measures to keep my bills down. For this, I'm ridiculed by my own family. For this, I'm called the Thermostat Nazi. For this, my family calls me mean and intractable and a bunch of other things that aren't very nice. All because of a simple rule which I thought we had all agreed on, but which they now say was rammed down their throats as if by some kind of Mafia decree. And that rule is: The thermostat is set at 62 degrees.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp | July 24, 2005
Many parts of the country have endured brutally hot weather in recent days, and more is likely on the way as August approaches. It's important to stay cool at home, but consumers are wasting a lot of money because of misconceptions about how to do it properly. The money involved could be significant. The average U.S. household spends more than $200 a year on cooling, while hotter regions could be paying double that, according to the Alliance to Save Energy. Here are some myths that may be costing you money: Fans cool the house.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2004
As temperatures drop, make it a habit to be more energy-efficient to reduce heating bills. Take advantage of heat from activities, says TipKing.com, a Web site that offers money-saving tips for households: Cook meals to generate warmth. When you shower, leave the bathroom door open to spread steam through your home. Still, consider halving your time in the shower. Other suggestions: Wear socks at home. Your feet are sensitive to cold. If you get chilly, put on a sweater or wrap yourself in a blanket before turning up the thermostat.
FEATURES
By James Dulley and James Dulley,Contributing Writer | October 17, 1992
Q: I want to keep my old gas furnace running as efficiently as possible and not buy a new one. What simple things can I do to get it ready for winter and keep it running well?A: It is always a good idea to do some minor maintenance eacfall. By spending an hour or two, you should be able to cut at least $100 off your annual utility bills. A gas (natural or bottled) furnace should be inspected by a qualified service technician every two years.Your fall checkup should include a change of the furnace filter.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | July 10, 2005
MEL COLWELL of Baltimore gave up road trips to the countryside about a year ago when gas prices grew too steep. And though the 83-year-old retired steelworker says he has always driven the speed limit, he has begun to lighten up on the pedal to conserve fuel. Colwell used to spend less than $20 to fill up his '92 Pontiac Grand Am. Last week, he paid $29 for less than 13 gallons - not even a full tank. Pointing to the pump, Colwell predicted Americans haven't seen the worst of the rising gas prices.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 11, 2005
Like many Marylanders, the recent heat wave sent me scurrying to the controls of the air conditioner. Early in the week, the weather switched from behaving like delightful April temperatures to a sweltering mid-August mode. I consoled myself with the thought that my home's cooling equipment was ready to spring into action. Or so I thought. A new thermostat had been hooked up to my home's central air-conditioning system. But as I got acquainted with the device, it became apparent to me that chilling out was not going to be as simple as it once was. My old thermostat had limited choices.
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