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By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to delve into the private dealings of therapists with their patients to determine whether such counseling will be protected by a shroud of confidentiality in the federal courts.If the court provides some privacy for what is said in therapy sessions, it is expected to decide how far the protection extends: to counseling by any medical professional, or only for sessions with psychiatrists or psychologists.Maryland and the 49 other states assure some privacy in state court for what a patient reveals to a therapist by banning or restricting the forced disclosure of such information.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Christopher Doyle says he doesn't think there is anything wrong with being gay, but he also believes he can help children and others rid themselves of "unwanted same-sex attractions" through therapy sessions in a tidy suburban home in Bowie. That has made the licensed psychotherapist the target of intense criticism over the years - so much so, he says, that he closely protects the address of the International Healing Foundation, the nearly 25-year-old nonprofit he runs. "Unfortunately, we get targeted by activists," Doyle said in the home on a recent morning.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
A mother who says she watched helplessly as a plainclothes security guard at a Rite Aid in Hampden scooped up her 10-year-old son and held him upside down is suing the guard and the corporation for $6 million. In the lawsuit, filed this week in Baltimore City Circuit Court, Tracy Martin claims that the guard, Walter Jackson, then dragged her son back into the store and searched his pockets as the boy screamed and cried. Jody Cook, a spokeswoman for Pennsylvania-based Rite Aid Corp., said she hadn't seen the lawsuit and declined to comment.
NEWS
By Melissa Healy and Melissa Healy,Los Angeles Times | June 1, 2007
You want to linger over lunch in a charming village. Your best friend, however, is itching for a quick bite and a sprint through three museums. The secluded beach looks like heaven to you, but your teenager pronounces it creepy and heads instead for the pool. Your partner wants to have sex immediately after tipping the bellhop, and you just want to sleep for two days. Welcome to vacation dysphoria. It's not a destination; it's a state of mind, and you know you've arrived when you look at your beloved travel companion and ask, "Who is this person, anyway?"
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | April 4, 1994
Joyce Moser, 38, doesn't remember the car wreck that catapulted her 145-pound, 5-foot 4-inch body through the passenger window of her crumpled dark-blue Acura and left her sprawled on Ritchie Highway with multiple fractures and a broken neck.Her memories begin 12 hours after the accident on Nov. 5, when she came out of a coma. Her father, Jim Moser, says doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital were surprised she survived.Now, five months later, Ms. Moser is in good spirits, optimistic that with several months or maybe a year of physical therapy, she will regain the stamina and dexterity she showed on the tennis court and at The Strip Shop, a furniture stripping and refinishing business she owns with a high school friend.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2004
George Griffin is 47 years old and loves glitter. He sprinkles red glitter over triangles of glue to create a "fortune wheel." Colorful feathers and pipe cleaner complete the whimsy. "I was trying to make that like a fantasy," he said. "It's supposed to mean `best of luck' and `money' and `sun.'" By his own account, Griffin is not a fortunate person. Violence, incarceration and homelessness have been the mileposts of his life. But recently his luck changed. He has a home, and his sister helps him with his finances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | August 6, 2004
When Metallica decided to record its first album of new material in five years ("St. Anger"), the band invited filmmakers Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky to document the process. From 2001-2003, they were given unlimited access, capturing group therapy sessions and angry outbursts on film, resulting in an honest and intimate portrait of the band and its members. Sinofsky and Berlinger also directed 1992's critically acclaimed "Brother's Keeper" and 1996's "Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hills," which featured Metallica on its soundtrack.
NEWS
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1996
"Midlife Queer: Autobiography of a Decade 1971-1981," by Martin Duberman. Scribner. 237 pages. $23.Jonathan Yardley once lamented novels that "consist of little more than the tedious enumeration of their authors' thinly disguised experiences, unadorned by invention or plot or imagination." But what about a memoir written without art or persuasive passion, whose author declares, "We cannot recover past experience ... in a form sufficiently detailed, accurate, and intimate to illuminate ... our present griefs and appetites" but spends three paragraphs on what he calls "the Drama of the Impacted Stool?"
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- A Montgomery County circuit judge refused yesterday to shorten the jail sentence of former U.S. Senate candidate Ruthann Aron, despite her teary plea for forgiveness.During a three-hour hearing, Aron's lawyers sought to have her moved to a halfway house now rather than in April, saying her mental state is deteriorating.At the end of the hearing, Aron rose to plead her case."I don't know what I could say to the court. I don't know what anyone could say for me," she said in a soft, flat voice.
NEWS
By Melissa Healy and Melissa Healy,Los Angeles Times | June 1, 2007
You want to linger over lunch in a charming village. Your best friend, however, is itching for a quick bite and a sprint through three museums. The secluded beach looks like heaven to you, but your teenager pronounces it creepy and heads instead for the pool. Your partner wants to have sex immediately after tipping the bellhop, and you just want to sleep for two days. Welcome to vacation dysphoria. It's not a destination; it's a state of mind, and you know you've arrived when you look at your beloved travel companion and ask, "Who is this person, anyway?"
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | January 21, 2007
ST. MICHAELS -- The sun was rising in a ribbon of crimson over the Choptank River as Barry Yancosek lugged a veteran's wheelchair backward through sand and spartina grass along the shore. Yancosek, a therapist at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, helped Chad Kueser, who lost both legs in the Iraq war, hide behind camouflage netting with a shotgun. Next to him, three other servicemen with prosthetic or disabled arms hunkered down into a duck blind. During a morning of biting wind and numbing cold, they felt their spirits lifted by camaraderie and breathtaking scenery.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
A mother who says she watched helplessly as a plainclothes security guard at a Rite Aid in Hampden scooped up her 10-year-old son and held him upside down is suing the guard and the corporation for $6 million. In the lawsuit, filed this week in Baltimore City Circuit Court, Tracy Martin claims that the guard, Walter Jackson, then dragged her son back into the store and searched his pockets as the boy screamed and cried. Jody Cook, a spokeswoman for Pennsylvania-based Rite Aid Corp., said she hadn't seen the lawsuit and declined to comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | August 6, 2004
When Metallica decided to record its first album of new material in five years ("St. Anger"), the band invited filmmakers Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky to document the process. From 2001-2003, they were given unlimited access, capturing group therapy sessions and angry outbursts on film, resulting in an honest and intimate portrait of the band and its members. Sinofsky and Berlinger also directed 1992's critically acclaimed "Brother's Keeper" and 1996's "Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hills," which featured Metallica on its soundtrack.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2004
George Griffin is 47 years old and loves glitter. He sprinkles red glitter over triangles of glue to create a "fortune wheel." Colorful feathers and pipe cleaner complete the whimsy. "I was trying to make that like a fantasy," he said. "It's supposed to mean `best of luck' and `money' and `sun.'" By his own account, Griffin is not a fortunate person. Violence, incarceration and homelessness have been the mileposts of his life. But recently his luck changed. He has a home, and his sister helps him with his finances.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- A Montgomery County circuit judge refused yesterday to shorten the jail sentence of former U.S. Senate candidate Ruthann Aron, despite her teary plea for forgiveness.During a three-hour hearing, Aron's lawyers sought to have her moved to a halfway house now rather than in April, saying her mental state is deteriorating.At the end of the hearing, Aron rose to plead her case."I don't know what I could say to the court. I don't know what anyone could say for me," she said in a soft, flat voice.
NEWS
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1996
"Midlife Queer: Autobiography of a Decade 1971-1981," by Martin Duberman. Scribner. 237 pages. $23.Jonathan Yardley once lamented novels that "consist of little more than the tedious enumeration of their authors' thinly disguised experiences, unadorned by invention or plot or imagination." But what about a memoir written without art or persuasive passion, whose author declares, "We cannot recover past experience ... in a form sufficiently detailed, accurate, and intimate to illuminate ... our present griefs and appetites" but spends three paragraphs on what he calls "the Drama of the Impacted Stool?"
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Christopher Doyle says he doesn't think there is anything wrong with being gay, but he also believes he can help children and others rid themselves of "unwanted same-sex attractions" through therapy sessions in a tidy suburban home in Bowie. That has made the licensed psychotherapist the target of intense criticism over the years - so much so, he says, that he closely protects the address of the International Healing Foundation, the nearly 25-year-old nonprofit he runs. "Unfortunately, we get targeted by activists," Doyle said in the home on a recent morning.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | January 21, 2007
ST. MICHAELS -- The sun was rising in a ribbon of crimson over the Choptank River as Barry Yancosek lugged a veteran's wheelchair backward through sand and spartina grass along the shore. Yancosek, a therapist at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, helped Chad Kueser, who lost both legs in the Iraq war, hide behind camouflage netting with a shotgun. Next to him, three other servicemen with prosthetic or disabled arms hunkered down into a duck blind. During a morning of biting wind and numbing cold, they felt their spirits lifted by camaraderie and breathtaking scenery.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to delve into the private dealings of therapists with their patients to determine whether such counseling will be protected by a shroud of confidentiality in the federal courts.If the court provides some privacy for what is said in therapy sessions, it is expected to decide how far the protection extends: to counseling by any medical professional, or only for sessions with psychiatrists or psychologists.Maryland and the 49 other states assure some privacy in state court for what a patient reveals to a therapist by banning or restricting the forced disclosure of such information.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | April 4, 1994
Joyce Moser, 38, doesn't remember the car wreck that catapulted her 145-pound, 5-foot 4-inch body through the passenger window of her crumpled dark-blue Acura and left her sprawled on Ritchie Highway with multiple fractures and a broken neck.Her memories begin 12 hours after the accident on Nov. 5, when she came out of a coma. Her father, Jim Moser, says doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital were surprised she survived.Now, five months later, Ms. Moser is in good spirits, optimistic that with several months or maybe a year of physical therapy, she will regain the stamina and dexterity she showed on the tennis court and at The Strip Shop, a furniture stripping and refinishing business she owns with a high school friend.
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