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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Gay rights advocates and the state legislator who introduced legislation this session to ban so-called "gay conversion therapy" in Maryland have withdrawn the bill, saying they will instead pursue regulatory oversight of the controversial practice. "If we can do this without legislation, I am all about it," said Baltimore County Del. John Cardin, the bill's sponsor, in a statement Friday. "I am not interested in the glory. I'm interested in solving problems. " Cardin's bill would have banned mental health professionals, but not unlicensed church clergy or therapists, from engaging in efforts to change a youth's sexual orientation or gender identity.
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NEWS
March 25, 2014
"Step therapy" is a perfect metaphor for corporate capitalism's continuing assault on human well-being (" Putting doctors back in charge of health care March 24). According to commentator Gene Ransom III, private health insurers can overrule a doctor's prescription by not paying for it until the patient has first tried a less costly therapy. In fact, however, the insurer can insist upon several less costly "steps" before paying for the prescribed medication, all in the name of cost containment -- or in other words, profit.
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | May 23, 2013
Sometimes it helps to share your goals and setbacks with others in similar straits. That's sort of the theory behind the Maryland CASH Campaign's financial coaching program that will start in June. The program will be open to 10 to 15 Baltimore-area residents who will set a goal and meet weekly for six weeks for group coaching so they can reach their target. Just as some people manage to shed pounds through weight-loss programs with group support, some people achieve financial goals in a group setting, too, said Robin McKinney, director of the Maryland CASH Campaign.  "Some prefer the accountability you have with a group.
NEWS
By Gene Ransom III | March 24, 2014
It's a fairly simple concept: When ill, you seek effective treatment from your doctor. Despite efforts by some Maryland health insurers to insert themselves into the middle of the physician-patient relationship, lawmakers are poised to make this simple idea - that doctors are the correct people to decide treatment for their patients - a reality for Maryland patients. Important patient protection legislation is working its way through the Maryland General Assembly after clearing key hurdles in both chambers and should soon end up on the governor's desk.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
The first chapter of Boston Marathon bombing victim Erika Brannock's recovery ended Tuesday when she hoisted herself from a wheelchair into the passenger seat of a silver Honda CR-V and her mother drove out of the Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation parking lot. After 65 days of hospitalization and inpatient physical therapy, the 29-year-old preschool teacher moved into her mother and stepfather's Monkton home while she adjusts to a "new normal....
NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 3, 2001
SIX-YEAR-OLD Jacob Wenger Smith knows more about structure than most children his age, having spent the past two years in home-based therapy for autism. For 40 hours a week, he participates in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), a one-on-one therapy. He is also on a restricted diet that does not allow dairy, gluten, beef or additives. Jacob was 3 when his autism was diagnosed. After visits to specialists and a variety of tests, his parents, Steve and Doris Smith, decided that ABA might give Jacob the best chance for an independent future.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
Towson Rehabilitation Center LLC, a Towson physical, occupational and speech therapy provider, must restore more than $29,000 in interest to the company's 401(k) retirement plan, according to a consent judgment obtained in federal court by the U.S. Labor Department. In a lawsuit filed last January, the labor department alleged that since January 2006, Towson Rehabilitation and CEO Howard Neels failed to pay employee contributions to the plan, paid some employee contributions late without interest and failed to segregate the plan's assets from the company's assets.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 18, 1991
Four out of five patients who said they had sex with their psychotherapists after therapy ended suffered psychological harm as a result, according to a study to be published this fall in the journal Psychotherapy.The finding may bolster an emerging movement to ban sexual relationships between therapists and clients "in perpetuity." While sexual relationships are currently forbidden in all states during therapy, only Florida has an in perpetuity ban. A few states limit such relationships for varying periods after therapy.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1996
Osiris Therapeutics, a Baltimore biotechnology company, said yesterday that it will provide grants to the Ireland Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland to help pay for a clinical trial of a blood-boosting cell therapy the company has developed.Osiris' grants will pay for use of the therapy in breast cancer patients whose insurance does not cover such infusions.The clinical trial, which could involve up to 30 patients, began last month. It involves studying the safety of the Osiris therapy, which is designed to boost breast cancer patients' blood cell counts, said James Burns, Osiris' president.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | September 24, 1992
Univax Biologics Inc. of Rockville will collaborate with one o the nation's largest biotechnology companies to develop a preventive therapy for people who may have been exposed to the AIDS virus as well as for those already infected.Genentech Inc., a San Francisco company, chose Univax to develop the therapy because of the company's expertise in treatments based on antibodies.Genentech will give Univax a genetically engineered vaccine now being tested on humans. Univax will innoculate healthy, uninfected volunteers whose bodies are expected to produce antibodies to the AIDS virus.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Gay rights advocates and the state legislator who introduced legislation this session to ban so-called "gay conversion therapy" in Maryland have withdrawn the bill, saying they will instead pursue regulatory oversight of the controversial practice. "If we can do this without legislation, I am all about it," said Baltimore County Del. John Cardin, the bill's sponsor, in a statement Friday. "I am not interested in the glory. I'm interested in solving problems. " Cardin's bill would have banned mental health professionals, but not unlicensed church clergy or therapists, from engaging in efforts to change a youth's sexual orientation or gender identity.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Baltimore County Del. Jon Cardin introduced Wednesday a bill that would prohibit administering so-called "gay conversion therapy" to Maryland minors. The bill would prevent mental health professionals from engaging in efforts to change a youth's sexual orientation, a controversial practice that has been criticized by professional groups like the American Psychiatric Association and American Academy of Pediatrics. Cardin, who is running for attorney general, announced his intention to introduce the bill in December.
NEWS
By Sandy Greenquist | December 16, 2013
Over the past 20 years, conflicting information regarding the use of hormone therapy - and in particular bioidentical hormone therapy, which chemically matches hormones the body already produces - has confused women experiencing perimenopause and menopause. This has prevented many women from getting the treatment they desperately need to alleviate the at times debilitating symptoms that often occur at this phase of life. As a nurse-midwife specializing in menopause over the past two decades, I have been nothing short of shocked at the inaccuracies reported on the topic of hormone therapy.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Research shows that music therapy has a profound impact on premature infants. We asked Clarissa Karlsson, a board-certified music therapist at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., to explain the benefits. How does music therapy benefit preemies? Music therapy can positively affect premature infants' physiological stability, increase opportunities for bonding and attachment with caregivers, and provide appropriate developmental stimulation. Babies born before term are not as neurologically mature or physiologically stable as full-term babies.
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | September 11, 2013
Ivelisse Page is on a mission. In 2011, Page launched Believe Big, a nonprofit foundation that helps cancer patients and their families through this traumatic, life-changing diagnosis. Based on her own experience as a colon cancer survivor, Page aims to educate the cancer community about the importance of combining conventional and complementary approaches to treatment. To that end, Believe Big is the primary backer of a clinical trial of mistletoe extract, an alternative therapy Page underwent, slated to begin at Johns Hopkins Medicine's Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center within the next six months.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
Sister Jeanne Marie Armstrong, who nursed and did physical therapy treatment for her fellow School Sisters of Notre Dame, died of a stroke Aug. 18 at her order's health care center in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. She was 86. Born Jeanne Marie Armstrong in Baltimore, she was the daughter of John Ernest Armstrong and Lucille Marie Holliday. Raised in the Forest Park area, she attended All Saints School and was a 1945 graduate of the Institute of Notre Dame. She was a graduate of the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout | July 16, 1995
"Therapy," by David Lodge. 321 pages. New York: Viking. $22.95David Lodge is a funny man with a slight case of monomania. Most of his 10 comic novels are about middle-aged married men whose lives have gradually become unsatisfactory, and whose sex lives are similarly unsatisfactory; these men invariably contrive to have rip-roaringly hot extramarital affairs, and are thereby brought back to life. Lots of other amusing things happen in Lodge's books, but the equation Midlife Crisis + Illicit Fornication = Bliss is never very far from center stage.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | June 10, 1995
The wife of Christopher Reeve said yesterday that the actor had begun therapy for his paralysis and had been watching hockey on TV.Doctors at the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville where Mr. Reeve, 42, has been treated since his riding accident on May 27 reported that he had made some unexpected progress.They said that while he was still unable to breathe without a respirator, he did show signs of movement on both sides of his body.The doctors said he could eat solid food and was not in pain.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
A Howard County man confined to a state psychiatric hospital since he killed his mother and a teenage girl in the family's home a dozen years ago may have a chance for a conditional release after the state's top court ruled the decision to keep him at Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center was reached incorrectly. The ruling Monday by the Court of Appeals means Benjamin Morgan Hawkes could ultimately live in an outside facility while receiving psychiatric care. Hawkes was 25 when charged with fatally bludgeoning and stabbing his 59-year-old mother, Mary Jane Hawkes, and Teena Wu, 18, in the Hawkes' Ellicott City home in February 2001.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Virginia Thorndike strolls through the garden in front of her Monkton home each morning, carefully observing the ways the flowers have changed from the previous day. She sums up the feeling that overcomes her: "Gratitude. " Thorndike designed her garden as a spiritual retreat, positioning plants in ways that draw on ancient religious practices. Laid out in a half circle, the garden is bisected by a waterfall that ends in a pond at the base of a hill. Stones frame a yin-yang circle populated by Hoogendorn hollies.
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