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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Steven M. Smith, a respiratory therapist and outdoorsman, died Saturday from cancer at the Golden Living Center in Westminster. He was 56. The son of a United Methodist minister and a social worker, Steven Montgomery Smith was born in Laurel. He was raised in University Park and Edgewater before settling with his family in Mount Airy. While attending South Carroll High School, where he played football and soccer, he worked on a dairy farm. After graduating in 1975 from South Carroll High School, he worked at Carroll County General Hospital, now the Carroll Hospital Center, while attending the University of Maryland, College Park.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Steven M. Smith, a respiratory therapist and outdoorsman, died Saturday from cancer at the Golden Living Center in Westminster. He was 56. The son of a United Methodist minister and a social worker, Steven Montgomery Smith was born in Laurel. He was raised in University Park and Edgewater before settling with his family in Mount Airy. While attending South Carroll High School, where he played football and soccer, he worked on a dairy farm. After graduating in 1975 from South Carroll High School, he worked at Carroll County General Hospital, now the Carroll Hospital Center, while attending the University of Maryland, College Park.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Forget the water cooler - or any other public space like social media or the Internet. When a TV show strikes the kind of psychic chords that HBO's “Game of Thrones” did last week with its blood-drenched Red Wedding sequence, the morning-after conversation is just as likely to find its way into the very private realm of a therapist's office. That's what happened at the Potomac practice of psychiatrist Dr. Michael Brody, anyway. “All season with this show, I start hearing about it from my patients on Monday,” Brody says.
FEATURES
By Andy Wolt | June 11, 2013
Some of you may recognize me from my SpaceManAndy advice column in City That Breeds. Well, I've decided to focus my efforts here, on the LGBT community. As a gay man living in Baltimore, I'm here to answer any and every question you can throw at me. Sometimes it just helps to get a little third party perspective. Your friends might tell you what you want to hear, but I will give you my honest opinion on what's best. I mean, I don't even know you, I wouldn't even know how to placate you. You can write in with questions on all sorts of topics.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | April 5, 1992
I think it's safe to say that when it comes to creating a good public image, you can chalk up the past year as a very bad one for psychotherapists.No other group -- with the exception of politicians, of course -- has caught more flak or taken a harder pounding recently than the professionals engaged in the psychotherapeutic treatment of patients in a one-on-one setting behind closed doors.From their portrayal in such films as "The Prince of Tides" and "Final Analysis" -- films in which psychiatrists played by Barbra Streisand and Richard Gere sleep with siblings of clients -- to recent revelations about numerous real-life cases of sex between therapist and patient, to the controversial release of private tapes to a biographer by the late Anne Sexton's psychiatrist, therapists have taken it on the chin lately.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
"This kid was just as imaginative and is just as adventurous as Steve Jobs was at the age of 7," said the attorney for the boy suspended from school after he nibbled a gun-shaped Pop-Tart ("Appeal filed in 7-year-old's suspension over pastry," March 19). I really don't believe Steve Jobs ever bit a pastry into the shape of a gun and then pointed it at other students. What the boy's attorney, and more importantly, his parents should be doing is sitting down with the 7-year-old and asking him what was going through his mind when he made the shape of a gun and pointed it at his classmates as if it were a game.
NEWS
September 21, 1993
Westminster Physical Therapy recently announced the addition of Brenda Stillman, a licensed physical therapist for two years, to the office.She came to Westminster Physical after working at Maryland General Hospital's Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation Center.There she developed clinical knowledge in the area of acute care, neurological impairments and body mechanics.Ms. Stillman is a graduate of Daemen College in Amherst, N.Y., where she majored in physical therapy and minored in biology. She is a member of the Reisterstown Volunteer Fire Department and attends Baltimore County Fire and Rescue Academy for training as an emergency medical technician.
NEWS
August 25, 2004
Margaret M. Radin, a retired child therapist with Jewish Family and Children's Service, died of heart failure Friday at Sinai Hospital. The longtime Mount Washington resident was 80. She was born Margaret Morrison in Baltimore and raised in Guilford. She was a 1941 graduate of Park School and studied for three years at Goucher College. She later attended the Johns Hopkins University, earning a bachelor's degree in 1955. She was married for 60 years to Jacob Radin, a retired certified public accountant and Baltimore Symphony Orchestra violinist, who survives her. In the early 1960s, Mrs. Radin was a research assistant on a Johns Hopkins Hospital whooping cough study.
NEWS
By Thomas J. Cottle | March 9, 2003
BOSTON - It is generally accepted that no theory of the self can exclude the powerful forces of the environment, the society, the culture, the world. Not everything that disrupts or befuddles us is due to one part of the mind messing with another part. Not surprisingly, Freud located a place in his theory of personality for experiences that could terrify an individual, experiences that resulted in what he called normal anxiety. There is, after all, nothing neurotic about fearing a tornado, war or terrorist attack.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1996
Nine years ago, Debra M. Doricchi was bedridden with chronic fatigue syndrome.Now, Doricchi is up and about and running the county's first shiatsu clinic out of her home on Clarence Avenue in Severna Park.Shiatsu, which means "finger pressure" in Japanese, is a massage therapy that is derived from the ancient healing art of acupuncture and a traditional form of Japanese massage called anma.Doricchi, 43, credits massage therapy and other alternative health-care practices such as acupuncture and chiropractic treatment with helping her recover.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Forget the water cooler - or any other public space like social media or the Internet. When a TV show strikes the kind of psychic chords that HBO's “Game of Thrones” did last week with its blood-drenched Red Wedding sequence, the morning-after conversation is just as likely to find its way into the very private realm of a therapist's office. That's what happened at the Potomac practice of psychiatrist Dr. Michael Brody, anyway. “All season with this show, I start hearing about it from my patients on Monday,” Brody says.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Donald J. Artes, a Sinai Hospital pediatric respiratory therapist who was known as a skilled clinician and administrator, died May 24 of complications from an infection at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Fullerton resident was 54. "He was a great man for sure. He was an inspiration to everyone at Sinai, and he always had the right attitude and sense of humor, no matter what the circumstances as he faced Crohn's and kidney disease," said David R. Madden, manager of the respiratory department at Sinai Hospital, whom Mr. Artes had hired at the University of Maryland Medical Center in 1996.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
Your editorial, "Good government wins," (April 15) falls short of the mark. Bestowing kudos to the General Assembly for passing legislation that makes campaign finance more helpful in "restoring integrity to the political process" is, with all due respect, misguided. As you point out, these reforms are offset with other provisions which result in a process that facilitates throwing more money into the political arena instead of getting money out. The actions of the General Assembly with regard to campaign finance reform bring to mind the following analogy.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
"This kid was just as imaginative and is just as adventurous as Steve Jobs was at the age of 7," said the attorney for the boy suspended from school after he nibbled a gun-shaped Pop-Tart ("Appeal filed in 7-year-old's suspension over pastry," March 19). I really don't believe Steve Jobs ever bit a pastry into the shape of a gun and then pointed it at other students. What the boy's attorney, and more importantly, his parents should be doing is sitting down with the 7-year-old and asking him what was going through his mind when he made the shape of a gun and pointed it at his classmates as if it were a game.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
I am an occupational therapy student at Towson University, and I wanted to express my opinion concerning Kevin Rector's article, "Hospitals join to find beds for mental patients" (Feb. 19). Throughout the article, I saw reference to health professionals including nurses, social workers, and psychiatrists. However, I didn't see mention of occupational therapists. I don't know if you are aware that occupational therapists play a significant role in the treatment of patients admitted to psychiatric facilities.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Michelle LeM. Flesher, a retired Towson artist who had been an art restorer and therapist, died Feb. 14 of heart failure at St. Elizabeth Hall Apartments at Stella Maris in Timonium. She was 87. Born Michelle LeMay in Saginaw, Mich., she moved with her family in 1931 when she was 5 to Nice, France, where she received her education. She studied art and design and earned degrees from the Ecole nationale superieure des Beaux Arts and Les Arts Decoratifs, both in Paris. "Possession of U.S. papers in war-torn France made daily life difficult at best, harrowing at worst," said a son, Robert W. Flesher of Towson.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | July 18, 1993
A Circuit Court jury will be asked tomorrow to decide the fate of a Grasonville man charged with sexually abusing his three daughters, ending a trial that focused on the power of a therapist's suggestion.The four-day trial before Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. began Tuesday with the daughters -- now in their 30s -- testifying that they recalled repressed memories of being abused up to 30 years ago after all three came under the care of the same therapist.The defense has used a gynecologist, a pathologist, a psychiatrist and a psychologist to try to discredit the therapist, Patricia Hartge of Annapolis, and show that she might have planted the suggestion of abuse in the victims' heads.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | August 29, 2009
When longtime Baltimore Symphony Orchestra violinist Ivan Stefanovic lost the sensation in the index finger of his left hand, he asked colleagues where he could get help. The answer for Stefanovic, as it has been for a number of the orchestra's musicians: David Shulman, a former professional clarinetist turned physical therapist. "What impressed me was that the first thing he said was, 'Bring in your instrument.' That immediately told me he was a different therapist," Stefanovic says. "We don't have to explain what we do and how we do it. He knows what kind of injuries we sustain and how to treat it without injuring us further."
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
When did the holidays become an exercise in anxiety, tension mounting with each fa, la and la? Shopping stress. Baking stress. Light-stringing stress. Relatives. And that "Are you ready for Christmas?" thing. Hardly helping. But the year is winding down - shouldn't we take a cue? To that end, it seemed a good, scented rubdown couldn't hurt. I took on the not particularly arduous task of searching area spas for a moment or two of Zen, to see if a massage, scrub or perhaps a paraffin pedicure could straighten the star atop the tree and help the Hanukkah oil burn an extra night.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 11, 2012
A Baltimore-based therapist who was disturbed by the response to the murder-suicide committed by a Kansas City Chiefs player has taken her cause national. Gretchen Tome, who works at House of Ruth, posted a petition on Change.org demanding NFL commissioner Roger Goodell mandate players convicted of domestic-violence related charges receive counseling. As of 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, more than 6,700 people had electronically "signed" the petition. Each time someone endorses the petition, an email is sent to Goodell and three members of his staff.
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