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Therapeutic Riding

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NEWS
By Kevin Harrison | September 24, 1995
The volunteers: Because Denise Gilbert has been interested in horses for years, she couldn't help but notice the ad in the local Pennysaver for volunteers to help at the county's therapeutic riding program.She signed up quickly, and for the last two years she and her son, Michael, 12, have been helping disabled riders mount and dismount and leading their horses around the Andover Equestrian Center in Linthicum. Last year, her husband, Greg, helped as well.The program is offered each spring and fall.
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NEWS
By Linda Burkins and For The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
On a sunny summer day, 14-year-old Julianna Lupacchino is riding a horse on a Fallston farm. At first glance, the scene seems like nothing special - Harford County is horse country, after all - but at Chesapeake Therapeutic Riding, the occasion is very special indeed; Julianna more frequently uses a wheelchair. Julianna is one of 23 therapeutic riding clients at Chesapeake, where trained staff, volunteers and medical professionals use horses to facilitate physical and mental therapy.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2002
AMANDA DECKER of Dayton and her friends love the Therapeutic and Recreational Riding Center (TRRC) in Glenwood. When they saw an opportunity to help the center, they were eager to contribute. On Nov. 4, Oreo, a well-loved and important Norwegian fjord horse, died. That left the center with one Norwegian fjord, and a second was needed to meet the needs of the center's therapeutic riders. "We need a bombproof pony," said Amanda's mother, Laura Decker, and this type of horse fits that description.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 9, 2014
Ground was broken Thursday for a new county government funded facility to provide therapeutic horseback riding activities for children and adults with special needs, disadvantaged and at-risk young people and elderly citizens. The Harford County Department of Parks and Recreation has teamed up with Chesapeake Therapeutic Riding to create a permanent home for the Chesapeake Therapeutic Riding Program at Oakington Farm along the Chesapeake Bay near Havre de Grace. "This is a wonderful partnership to help serve the citizens of Harford County.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | October 20, 1994
Therapeutic: Having healing or curative powers. That is what the Therapeutic and Recreational Riding Center provides.It has more than 300 horseback riding students, mostly from the Baltimore-Washington area. Many of these youngsters and adults, director Helen Tuel says, have disabilities stemming from physical and mental conditions. They ride to improve their lives through the stimulation they receive at the center.On Saturday, the center on Shady Lane in Glenwood will dedicate its first building completed under its planned $3.5 million expansion.
NEWS
By Shelley Koop and Shelley Koop,Cecil Whig | October 8, 1993
PORT DEPOSIT -- David Schlegel was born with cerebral palsy -- brain damage which causes trouble with muscle coordination and speech, and sometimes results in mental retardation.That was 37 years ago, before doctors had learned the possibilities offered by physical therapy.Now, children born with physical and mental challenges can benefit early from programs such as therapeutic riding at Freedom Hills near Port Deposit.And after six years of therapy at Freedom Hill, Mr. Schlegel is also getting better.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2008
For nearly an hour each week, children who have disabilities and cannot easily communicate take delight in commanding a 1,100-pound horse to go, canter and stop. They sit tall and ride proudly, usually with a smile, as their horses trot around a show ring on a farm near Bel Air. Safety demands that the young equestrians in the Chesapeake Therapeutic Riding Program be surrounded by side-walkers and trainers during their riding lessons, but they are in the saddle, and they hold the reins.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 1996
IT'S hard to believe, but rain and that awful S word, (snow) were responsible for many closings Tuesday evening. One of the canceled programs was the first day of the spring session of Carroll County 4-H Therapeutic Riding Program.The program, held in the spring and fall at the Agricultural Center in Westminster, will take place every Tuesday and Wednesday for eight weeks. Instead of beginning Tuesday, the first session took place Wednesday.Here, children and adults with physical, cognitive and emotional disabilities participate as equals in a world that does not always seem equal.
NEWS
By Sharahn D. Boykin and Sharahn D. Boykin,Sun Reporter | July 27, 2007
Maryland Therapeutic Riding is at Mother Nature's mercy. A hot day, a steady rain or a heavy snow is all it takes to shut down the outdoor Crownsville program that brings together people with disabilities and horses. Uncomfortable or even unsafe weather conditions regularly force the center to call any combination of its 90 clients and 200 volunteers to cancel classes and cram in makeup sessions in an already tight riding schedule, said Glenda Bland, 58, a spokeswoman for the center. "We're so weather dependent right now," Bland said.
NEWS
By ALIA MALIK and ALIA MALIK,SUN REPORTER | July 5, 2006
Stephanie Pippen was running out of hope. Her son, Max, who suffers from epilepsy and a rare genetic condition that weakens his muscles, was 3 years old and could barely walk. He was seeing a physical therapist, but it wasn't helping. Pippen read about Maryland Therapeutic Riding, a Crownsville organization that offers physical and mental therapy through riding and interacting with horses, and figured she'd try it with Max. After two hours on horseback, Max was running across uneven surfaces.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | February 19, 2012
Approximately 50 horses will be on display for auction at the Carroll County Agriculture Center in Westminster on Sunday, Feb. 26. One is blue, another has stripes and another has balloons. Another has the scene of a fox hunt painted on its side. Yet another comes with two tickets to a Broadway show. These horses don't eat much and can easily fit into your car - they aren't real, but rather a mix of ceramic statues, wooden models and others - all created for the "Horses of Many Colors for a Cause Retreat Round-Up," a fundraiser hosted by the Horse of Course 4-H Club, and benefiting The Retreat at Beckleysville.
NEWS
October 17, 2011
Chesapeake Therapeutic Riding is conducting a volunteer orientation Oct. 29, from 2:30 p.m. to 5 at Tuckaway Farm in Havre de Grace. Volunteers are needed for various duties such as horse leading, side walking, horse care, facility maintenance and administrative duties. Chesapeake Therapeutic Riding offers therapeutic riding lessons to people with special needs. Volunteer forms can be found at http://www.chesapeaketherapeuticriding.org on the volunteer page. Originals must be submitted prior to attending the the volunteer orientation.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2008
For nearly an hour each week, children who have disabilities and cannot easily communicate take delight in commanding a 1,100-pound horse to go, canter and stop. They sit tall and ride proudly, usually with a smile, as their horses trot around a show ring on a farm near Bel Air. Safety demands that the young equestrians in the Chesapeake Therapeutic Riding Program be surrounded by side-walkers and trainers during their riding lessons, but they are in the saddle, and they hold the reins.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | October 22, 2007
PORT DEPOSIT -- There were balloons bouncing, welcome-home banners flapping, high school cheerleaders performing and a crowd of more than 3,000 people practicing a collective holler as they waited for the limousine to roll up the freshly paved driveway. One week after Extreme Makeover: Home Edition sent the Luther family packing on a vacation to Italy, Renee Sherrard-Luther and her two teenage children returned yesterday to roars from onlookers. On cue, the crowd shouted "Move that bus!"
NEWS
By Sharahn D. Boykin and Sharahn D. Boykin,Sun Reporter | July 27, 2007
Maryland Therapeutic Riding is at Mother Nature's mercy. A hot day, a steady rain or a heavy snow is all it takes to shut down the outdoor Crownsville program that brings together people with disabilities and horses. Uncomfortable or even unsafe weather conditions regularly force the center to call any combination of its 90 clients and 200 volunteers to cancel classes and cram in makeup sessions in an already tight riding schedule, said Glenda Bland, 58, a spokeswoman for the center. "We're so weather dependent right now," Bland said.
NEWS
By ALIA MALIK and ALIA MALIK,SUN REPORTER | July 5, 2006
Stephanie Pippen was running out of hope. Her son, Max, who suffers from epilepsy and a rare genetic condition that weakens his muscles, was 3 years old and could barely walk. He was seeing a physical therapist, but it wasn't helping. Pippen read about Maryland Therapeutic Riding, a Crownsville organization that offers physical and mental therapy through riding and interacting with horses, and figured she'd try it with Max. After two hours on horseback, Max was running across uneven surfaces.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 1997
It took a little longer and cost a little more than planned, but the 4-H Therapeutic Riding Program's indoor arena has its official opening today.The riding ring at the Carroll County Agricultural Center will allow the program to hold riding lessons almost nine months a year. Until now, its classes for the physically and emotionally disabled were limited by weather and daylight."Always before, we had to stop when Daylight Saving Time was over. It got too dark!" said Bob Shirley, 4-H cooperative extension agent for the county and founder of the therapeutic riding program.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
In the 15 years he has helped disabled children in Carroll County's Therapeutic Riding Program, the horse dubbed Hot Shot has become celebrated for his sweet temperament, gentle canter, sturdy reliability and proud showmanship. "He is a charmer with a capital C," said Becky Herrick, whose 11-year-old daughter rode Hot Shot at a demonstration at Shawan Downs Legacy steeplechase in Baltimore County two weeks ago. "He is gorgeous and moves like a cloud. We think of him as the miracle horse."
NEWS
February 12, 2006
Riding program seeks volunteers The 4-H Therapeutic Riding Program of Carroll County is looking for youths and adults, ages 14 and up, to volunteer at lessons and to assist with horse care from March 20 to May 25. The all-volunteer program provides therapeutic riding lessons to children and adults with disabilities. Horse experience is a plus but not required. A training class is required and will be held at the 4-H riding program arena at the Carroll County Agriculture Center in Westminster.
NEWS
By ELLIE BAUBLITZ and ELLIE BAUBLITZ,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2006
Students at Carroll Community College have been helping to promote two nonprofit organizations and a grant-funded program in the county as part of a class project. Three students in the principles of marketing class last fall opted to take a noncredit honors seminar as part of the college's Community Partnership Project. The seminar involved doing a service-learning project with a community organization to get hands-on experience in marketing. "The honors marketing class is part of the college's service-learning, which encourages faculty to work in a community service curriculum so the students can learn community service as well as marketing," said Sylvia Blair, Carroll's community relations coordinator.
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