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By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | August 11, 1991
A mathematician from the University of California, Berkeley, says he has proved a theorem that has mystified scientists for 380 years.The theorem, put forth by astronomer Johannes Kepler in 1611, involves the most efficient way to pack round objects in a square box.Greengrocers have known intuitively for hundreds of years that the best way to pack oranges, for example, is to stagger thelayers so that each orange sits in the depression formed by three oranges...
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Jun-ichi Igusa, a retired Johns Hopkins university professor of mathematics who researched number theory and algebraic geometry, died of a stroke Nov. 24 at the Holly Hill Nursing Home. The Hunt Valley resident was 89. "He was a giant in his field," said Bernard Shiffman, chair of the Hopkins mathematics department. "He was meticulous in everything he did. Even when he taught elementary calculus, he was thorough and prepared his classes perfectly. He was warm to people and interested in helping his students.
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NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1995
Ryan Morgan has gotten used to sharing trade secrets with older and wiser mathematicians. So, the Patapsco High School junior was unfazed yesterday when he explained his findings -- widely considered a geometry theorem -- during a workshop at the annual conference of the Maryland Council of Teachers of Mathematics in Ellicott City.It was further proof that the work of a persistent student from Dundalk has captured the attention of math enthusiasts here and across the nation.Ryan shared the stage with "my colleagues" from Towson State University's math department and his former geometry teacher.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | March 22, 2011
Triplet brothers are having a blast at a water park late one afternoon and, despite pruned fingers, they don't want to leave. But it's getting late, and Dad says they must go in 15 minutes. Pick one of the superslides for one last ride of the day, dad instructs them. Of the three big slides, Adam's favorite is the red one, followed by the green and yellow slides. Burt's fave is green, with yellow second and red last. And Chip loves yellow, followed by red and green. The boys can't separate because Dad's safety rule is they keep together everywhere in the park.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | December 20, 1994
Ryan Morgan would have gotten an "A" in geometry even if he hadn't unearthed a mathematical treasure.But the persistent Patapsco High School sophomore pushed a hunch into a theory. He calls it Morgan's Conjecture, and is hoping it will soon be Morgan's Theorem.In geometric circles, developing a theorem is a big deal -- especially if you're only 15.Ryan's teacher at Patapsco High, Frank Nowosielski, has been teaching 20 years and has never had a student discover a theorem -- a mathematical statement that can be proved universally true.
NEWS
By Hannah Strauss | June 4, 1993
It will be discovered that my mind is part of yours: a mingling of the molecules with each exhaling word. One unifying theorem will articulate the curve through experience, through space/time where relationships occur. Neat investigation will illuminate the line and circuitry of friendship: a geodesic line which pulses, heart to heart,and back to heart through pain in tantric intimation of yet-unwoven skeins. New Age quantum theory may nonetheless leave free the matter of the heart's resilience, the matter of degree, the measurement of weight in loving, in firing the clay, in forming between two lives an image -- this connection: fiancee.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | June 23, 2007
Wayne Canter sees a weather pattern: "I live in Perry Hall ... When there is a line of thunderstorms approaching, they either fall apart or split apart just before reaching Perry Hall, only to re-energize after leaving the area." He asks if I have a theory to explain it. I do. It's the "New Seed Theorem." Someone has planted a lawn in Perry Hall, and this is his inevitable punishment: No rain. It's a corollary to the "Clean Car Law." Wash your car, and it will rain.
NEWS
By Tim Baker | February 14, 1991
Valentine's Day is the perfect occasion to explain the O'Hara-Butler Theorem of Romantic Determinism. Basically the theorem states that the ultimate success or failure of any romantic relationship is absolutely determined by how you and your sweetheart answer this one simple question: Does Scarlett get Rhett back?Of course, we all know Scarlett and Rhett. But let's take a moment and replay the scene anyway, just for the pure romantic pleasure of it.You remember. Rhett stands in the doorway and says goodbye.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | April 22, 1991
For the 26th anniversary of Earth Day, I thought I'd do something bold and daring. I'm publicly announcing my Environmental Theorem No. 1. For those not into stuffy science or fuzzy-warm ecology, I'll state it simply: Unless acted upon by considerable outside force (i.e., a smack upside the head), most people actually believe the Earth is flat.There, I said it. In public, in print.You see, most of us have never been on a space shuttle. So, while we may know intellectually that the Earth is round, our daily lives tend to reinforce the notion that it is actually flatter than the proverbial pancake.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Jun-ichi Igusa, a retired Johns Hopkins university professor of mathematics who researched number theory and algebraic geometry, died of a stroke Nov. 24 at the Holly Hill Nursing Home. The Hunt Valley resident was 89. "He was a giant in his field," said Bernard Shiffman, chair of the Hopkins mathematics department. "He was meticulous in everything he did. Even when he taught elementary calculus, he was thorough and prepared his classes perfectly. He was warm to people and interested in helping his students.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | June 23, 2007
Wayne Canter sees a weather pattern: "I live in Perry Hall ... When there is a line of thunderstorms approaching, they either fall apart or split apart just before reaching Perry Hall, only to re-energize after leaving the area." He asks if I have a theory to explain it. I do. It's the "New Seed Theorem." Someone has planted a lawn in Perry Hall, and this is his inevitable punishment: No rain. It's a corollary to the "Clean Car Law." Wash your car, and it will rain.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
There may be conventions with featured speakers who wear sandals in midwinter, admit their life's work has no practical applications and answer questions by writing out long and complicated equations. But not many conferences include topics so far from reality that even the organizers acknowledge they sound bizarre. About 5,000 mathematicians and math teachers are in Baltimore this week as part of the Joint Mathematics Meetings, held annually to discuss theorems, shapes and formulas that go way beyond balancing a checkbook.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1995
Ryan Morgan has gotten used to sharing trade secrets with older and wiser mathematicians. So, the Patapsco High School junior was unfazed yesterday when he explained his findings -- widely considered a geometry theorem -- during a workshop at the annual conference of the Maryland Council of Teachers of Mathematics in Ellicott City.It was further proof that the work of a persistent student from Dundalk has captured the attention of math enthusiasts here and across the nation.Ryan shared the stage with "my colleagues" from Towson State University's math department and his former geometry teacher.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | December 20, 1994
Ryan Morgan would have gotten an "A" in geometry even if he hadn't unearthed a mathematical treasure.But the persistent Patapsco High School sophomore pushed a hunch into a theory. He calls it Morgan's Conjecture, and is hoping it will soon be Morgan's Theorem.In geometric circles, developing a theorem is a big deal -- especially if you're only 15.Ryan's teacher at Patapsco High, Frank Nowosielski, has been teaching 20 years and has never had a student discover a theorem -- a mathematical statement that can be proved universally true.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 24, 1993
More than 350 years ago, a French mathematician wrote a deceptively simple theorem in the margins of a book, adding that he had discovered a marvelous proof of it but lacked space to include it in the margin.He died without ever offering his proof, and mathematicians have been trying ever since to supply it. Now, after thousands of claims of success that proved untrue, mathematicians say the ++ daunting challenge, perhaps the most famous of unsolved mathematical problems, has at last been surmounted.
NEWS
By Hannah Strauss | June 4, 1993
It will be discovered that my mind is part of yours: a mingling of the molecules with each exhaling word. One unifying theorem will articulate the curve through experience, through space/time where relationships occur. Neat investigation will illuminate the line and circuitry of friendship: a geodesic line which pulses, heart to heart,and back to heart through pain in tantric intimation of yet-unwoven skeins. New Age quantum theory may nonetheless leave free the matter of the heart's resilience, the matter of degree, the measurement of weight in loving, in firing the clay, in forming between two lives an image -- this connection: fiancee.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 24, 1993
More than 350 years ago, a French mathematician wrote a deceptively simple theorem in the margins of a book, adding that he had discovered a marvelous proof of it but lacked space to include it in the margin.He died without ever offering his proof, and mathematicians have been trying ever since to supply it. Now, after thousands of claims of success that proved untrue, mathematicians say the ++ daunting challenge, perhaps the most famous of unsolved mathematical problems, has at last been surmounted.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | March 22, 2011
Triplet brothers are having a blast at a water park late one afternoon and, despite pruned fingers, they don't want to leave. But it's getting late, and Dad says they must go in 15 minutes. Pick one of the superslides for one last ride of the day, dad instructs them. Of the three big slides, Adam's favorite is the red one, followed by the green and yellow slides. Burt's fave is green, with yellow second and red last. And Chip loves yellow, followed by red and green. The boys can't separate because Dad's safety rule is they keep together everywhere in the park.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | August 11, 1991
A mathematician from the University of California, Berkeley, says he has proved a theorem that has mystified scientists for 380 years.The theorem, put forth by astronomer Johannes Kepler in 1611, involves the most efficient way to pack round objects in a square box.Greengrocers have known intuitively for hundreds of years that the best way to pack oranges, for example, is to stagger thelayers so that each orange sits in the depression formed by three oranges...
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | April 22, 1991
For the 26th anniversary of Earth Day, I thought I'd do something bold and daring. I'm publicly announcing my Environmental Theorem No. 1. For those not into stuffy science or fuzzy-warm ecology, I'll state it simply: Unless acted upon by considerable outside force (i.e., a smack upside the head), most people actually believe the Earth is flat.There, I said it. In public, in print.You see, most of us have never been on a space shuttle. So, while we may know intellectually that the Earth is round, our daily lives tend to reinforce the notion that it is actually flatter than the proverbial pancake.
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