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NEWS
May 7, 2002
Sonya Sunnah Park, former director of Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity, died Saturday at Sinai Hospital of complications related to lupus. She was 35 and lived in Roland Park. Born in Baltimore and raised in Towson, she was a 1985 graduate of and valedictorian at of St. Paul's School for Girls. She earned a degree in psychology from Harvard University and a master's degree in divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary in 2000. As executive director of Chesapeake Habitat from 1990 to 1992, she led the church-based nonprofit organization's efforts to help low-income people become homeowners.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
The Rev. Eric W. Gritsch, a prominent Lutheran theologian, educator and author whose teaching career at the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Gettysburg, Pa., spanned more than three decades, died Dec. 29 at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center of complications from an infection. The longtime Canton resident was 81. Michael Cooper-White, president of the Lutheran Theological Seminary called Dr. Gritsch, "one of the giants in 20th-century Lutheranism. " "I am among hundreds of women and men privileged to have sat at his feet during his third of a century as a professor here at Gettysburg Seminary," he said.
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NEWS
March 16, 2007
HERMAN G. STUEMPFLE JR., 83 Lutheran minister The Rev. Herman G. Stuempfle Jr., a former Lutheran minister in Baltimore who became a national church leader and president of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, died Tuesday at the Lutheran Home in the Pennsylvania town from complications of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - Lou Gehrig's disease. Born in Clarion, Pa., he attended public schools in Hughesville, Pa., and was a graduate of Susquehanna University and the Lutheran seminary.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 21, 2008
The Rev. Walter J. Burghardt, a Jesuit theologian who taught at the old Woodstock College for more than three decades, died of congestive heart failure Friday at his order's retirement home in suburban Philadelphia. He was 93. Born in New York City, he attended Woodstock College in Baltimore County, where he was ordained into the Roman Catholic priesthood in 1941. He taught for 32 years. "Love every man, woman and child as Jesus loves us, each an image of God whether friend or enemy, of whatever culture or color," Father Burghardt once said.
NEWS
March 24, 1992
The Rev. Harry A. Price, a retired United Methodist minister who had been the first director of clergy services at Johns Hopkins Hospital, died March 10 of congestive heart failure at a retirement community in Selinsgrove, Pa. He was 96.Dr. Price moved to Selinsgrove from Baltimore in 1970.A memorial service for Dr. Price was held Sunday at the Wesley United Methodist Church in Selinsgrove.He was chaplain at the hospital from 1956 until his retirement in 1963. His wife, the former Mary Sanders, was director of nursing services and of the nursing school at Hopkins between 1963 and her retirement in 1970.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | November 23, 2007
The Rev. David B. "Pete" Pedersen, who served as pastor of Maryland Presbyterian Church in Towson for nearly a quarter-century before retiring in 1994, died of a heart attack Saturday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 73. Dr. Pedersen was born in Atlanta and raised in Chattanooga, Tenn., where he graduated from the Baylor School, a military academy, in 1952. He attended Georgia Tech University on a football scholarship, playing center for one season, before transferring to Emory University.
NEWS
June 8, 2001
Annapolis minister author of two books on faith, Unitarianism Having two books published simultaneously may seem quite an accomplishment, but their author - the Rev. Fredric John Muir, parish minister of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis - says it was more of an accident. The paperbound books, one looking at religious vocabulary through liberal eyes and the other on the Unitarian church in the Philippines, were planned for publication a year and half apart. But the first, "Heretics' Faith," was eaten by his computer - "erased," he said, leaving him faced with rewriting the entire volume.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 21, 2008
The Rev. Walter J. Burghardt, a Jesuit theologian who taught at the old Woodstock College for more than three decades, died of congestive heart failure Friday at his order's retirement home in suburban Philadelphia. He was 93. Born in New York City, he attended Woodstock College in Baltimore County, where he was ordained into the Roman Catholic priesthood in 1941. He taught for 32 years. "Love every man, woman and child as Jesus loves us, each an image of God whether friend or enemy, of whatever culture or color," Father Burghardt once said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | January 23, 2008
The Rev. Donald Macleod, former professor of preaching and worship at Princeton Theological Seminary who later became minister-in-residence at the Charlestown Retirement Community, died of heart failure Sunday at Oak Crest Village retirement community. He was 94. Dr. Macleod was born and raised in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. He received his bachelor's degree and a master's degree from Dalhousie University. He received a bachelor's in divinity from Pine Hill Divinity Hall in Halifax and was ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1938.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2002
The Rev. John R. Compton, a Lutheran minister who had been chairman of the Department of Pastoral Counseling at Loyola College's Columbia campus, died Monday of polyneuropathy at Carroll County General Hospital. He was 71. Mr. Compton, a Sykesville resident, was department chairman at the Columbia site from 1991 until his retirement in 1995. Born and raised in Washington, he was a 1949 graduate of McKinley High School. He earned his bachelor's degree in sociology from Capital University in Columbus, Ohio, in 1953, and a master's in divinity from Evangelical Lutheran Theological Seminary, also in Columbus.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | January 23, 2008
The Rev. Donald Macleod, former professor of preaching and worship at Princeton Theological Seminary who later became minister-in-residence at the Charlestown Retirement Community, died of heart failure Sunday at Oak Crest Village retirement community. He was 94. Dr. Macleod was born and raised in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. He received his bachelor's degree and a master's degree from Dalhousie University. He received a bachelor's in divinity from Pine Hill Divinity Hall in Halifax and was ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1938.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | November 23, 2007
The Rev. David B. "Pete" Pedersen, who served as pastor of Maryland Presbyterian Church in Towson for nearly a quarter-century before retiring in 1994, died of a heart attack Saturday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 73. Dr. Pedersen was born in Atlanta and raised in Chattanooga, Tenn., where he graduated from the Baylor School, a military academy, in 1952. He attended Georgia Tech University on a football scholarship, playing center for one season, before transferring to Emory University.
NEWS
March 16, 2007
HERMAN G. STUEMPFLE JR., 83 Lutheran minister The Rev. Herman G. Stuempfle Jr., a former Lutheran minister in Baltimore who became a national church leader and president of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, died Tuesday at the Lutheran Home in the Pennsylvania town from complications of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - Lou Gehrig's disease. Born in Clarion, Pa., he attended public schools in Hughesville, Pa., and was a graduate of Susquehanna University and the Lutheran seminary.
FEATURES
By David Colker and David Colker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 9, 2005
Neil Clark Warren, founder of the online dating site eHarmony .com Inc., does matchmaking by the numbers. Subscribers fill in 436 answers on a questionnaire. The company's computers then use a secret formula to match people using what Warren calls the 29 "dimensions" of a successful relationship. It's a personal ingredient - Warren himself, known to millions for his folksy pitches on television commercials - driving the business. Warren, 70, comes across as warm and encouraging. But as eHarmony becomes better known, Warren has had to tread a careful line: He has strong ties to evangelicals, who were responsible for the early success of eHarmony.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2004
When Vickie Stewart began saving souls on the streets of Brazil, skin color was among her greatest assets. Combining a mocha complexion with fluent Portuguese, she passed herself off as a local long enough to draw people in. "I would come up and say: `Would you like to come to Bible study?'" said Stewart, a black Baltimorean who returns to Brazil on Wednesday for a three-year tour as a Southern Baptist missionary. "They automatically thought I was Brazilian. It was really easy to connect."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2004
The Rev. William James Edward Apsley, a former electrical engineer whose later career as a Methodist minister spanned more than 40 years, died in his sleep June 15 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Middle River resident was 99. Mr. Apsley was born and raised in a Bank Street rowhouse in East Baltimore. He was a 1923 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned a degree in electrical engineering in 1926 from the Johns Hopkins University. Mr. Apsley held positions with American Telephone & Telegraph Co. and the Roland Park Co. and was chairman of the scientific-technical course at City College before joining Pennsylvania Water & Power Co. as a test engineer in 1930.
NEWS
November 1, 1994
HE'S just a little kid, 9 years old, and on his first American tour. He is a member of the Choir of the Cathedral and Abbey Church of Saint Alban which, taking advantage of the "half-term" break of the English school system, was on a mid-Atlantic states tour of the U.S.The schedule was tough: Virginia, Washington, D.C., Baltimore (where they sang in the evening at the old St. Paul's Church. Next day, Wilmington, Del. for two concerts, then Princeton for one. After that, New York City for several concerts, closing in New Haven, Conn.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1995
The Rev. Fred Stashkevetch, pastor of Ashland Presbyterian Church in Cockeysville since 1982, died Monday of a heart attack at his Reisterstown home. He was 49.Mr. Stashkevetch had been admitted into the Orthodox Church in America, an Eastern Orthodox Christian denomination, and ordained a deacon earlier this month. He was preparing to leave Ashland to teach Old Testament Studies at St. Tikhon Orthodox Theological Seminary in South Canaan, Pa.Family and friends said that he loved being pastor of Ashland and the parting was amicable.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2003
The Rev. John Bayley Jones IV, a United Methodist pastor who served in churches throughout the Baltimore and Washington area, died Tuesday of heart failure at Bonnie Blink, the Maryland Masonic Home in Hunt Valley. He was 95. Born and raised near Philadelphia, Mr. Jones graduated from Northeast High School in that city. While studying law and insurance at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, Mr. Jones was called to the ministry. His lifelong hunger for learning resulted in two bachelor's degrees, the first in 1935 in divinity from Westminster Theological Seminary at what then was Western Maryland College (now McDaniel College)
NEWS
May 7, 2002
Sonya Sunnah Park, former director of Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity, died Saturday at Sinai Hospital of complications related to lupus. She was 35 and lived in Roland Park. Born in Baltimore and raised in Towson, she was a 1985 graduate of and valedictorian at of St. Paul's School for Girls. She earned a degree in psychology from Harvard University and a master's degree in divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary in 2000. As executive director of Chesapeake Habitat from 1990 to 1992, she led the church-based nonprofit organization's efforts to help low-income people become homeowners.
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