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Theodore Roosevelt

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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2011
Eliot Spitzer signed off for good at CNN Wednesday night following the announcement earlier in the day that his "In the Arena" show would be replaced in the prime-time lineup Aug. 5. Spitzer, who started out paired with Kathleen Parker in "Parker-Spitzer," one of the most ill-conceived shows in the history of cable TV, kept his farewell remarks to a minimum quoting a famous passage from Theodore Roosevelt as to how critics don't matter, but...
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | April 26, 2013
Colleges Oakland Mills forward Long will join Patsos at Siena Oakland Mills senior Lavon Long committed to Siena during an official visit Thursday. The 6-foot-6 forward signed with Loyola in November, but received a release from his letter of intent after Jimmy Patsos took the Siena job earlier this month. Long, a second-team Baltimore Sun All-Metro selection, joins St. Frances guard Maurice White in the Saints' 2013 recruiting class. - Matt Bracken More men's basketball: Forest Park senior Wayne Hill has signed with CCBC-Catonsville, according to Foresters coach Greate White . Hill, a 6-foot-4 point guard, averaged 15 points, nine assists and eight rebounds as a senior.
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FEATURES
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 20, 1998
"The Lion's Pride: Theodore Roosevelt and His Family in Peace and War," by Edward J. Renehan Jr. Oxford University Press. 271 pages. $30.Theodore Roosevelt flung himself into fatherhood with the same gusto that he grasped, hugged and exulted in all the wonders of life. He was hero, companion and daunting role model to his six children, leading them on many a point-to-point hike where one could go over or under, but never around, any obstacle. His fierce patriotism and eagerness to risk death in battle, as exemplified by his daredevil charge up San Juan Hill, became a family as well as a national legend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2011
Eliot Spitzer signed off for good at CNN Wednesday night following the announcement earlier in the day that his "In the Arena" show would be replaced in the prime-time lineup Aug. 5. Spitzer, who started out paired with Kathleen Parker in "Parker-Spitzer," one of the most ill-conceived shows in the history of cable TV, kept his farewell remarks to a minimum quoting a famous passage from Theodore Roosevelt as to how critics don't matter, but...
NEWS
By Martin D. Tullai and Martin D. Tullai,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2002
Americans weary of pallid politicians and greedy corporate malefactors can now find cause to celebrate. Oct. 27 marks the 144th birthday of one public figure whom Americans can proudly admire: Theodore Roosevelt. There has been a remarkable revival of interest in this astute and inspiring leader. Books have highlighted his life, an aircraft carrier has been named in his honor, national magazines have carried his picture on their covers, and a football championship has been named after him (the NAIA Division II championship.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2005
He's got baseballs autographed by every American president since 1901, including the only known ball signed by Theodore Roosevelt and a few that were hurled as Opening Day first pitches. He's got Babe Ruth's 1920 bat, with indentations Ruth made each time he hit a home run. Remember George Brett's 1983 "pine tar" home run? He's got the can of pine tar. And while other collectors can boast that they have a copy of the first issue of Playboy featuring curvaceous Marilyn Monroe on its black-and-white cover, James Ancel has probably the only one signed by her husband, Joe DiMaggio.
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 1, 1998
Many years later, Theodore Roosevelt looked back on his "great day," July 1, 1898."It was a lovely morning," he wrote, "the sky a cloudless blue, while the level shimmering rays of the just-risen sun brought into relief the splendid palms which here and there towered above the lower growth. The lofty and beautiful mountains hemmed in the Santiago plain, making it an amphitheater for the battle."No mention there of the suffocating tropical heat, the mud, the confusion, the abominable slop that passed for rations, the stink of death and hasty latrines.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | July 6, 2006
A special issue of Time magazine celebrates the historic career of Theodore Roosevelt and the implications of his presidency for the development of American society. In the phony familiarity of our times, in which you call people by their first names when you have never even met them, the cover story in this issue is titled "Teddy." Theodore Roosevelt was indeed a landmark figure in the development of American politics and government, but in a very different sense from the way he is portrayed in Time.
SPORTS
January 6, 2005
Basketball Academy Tournament What: Games featuring some of the top boys and girls teams from both the Baltimore and Washington areas. When: Today through Saturday Where: Hill Field House, Morgan State Tickets: $5 if purchased at participating schools; $10 at the door. Schedule Today: Northwestern boys vs. Owings Mills, 2; No. 2 Western girls vs. No. 10 Milford Mill, 3:30; No. 9 Woodlawn girls vs. Riverdale Baptist, 5; City girls vs. Theodore Roosevelt (D.C.), 6:30; No. 14 Lake Clifton boys vs. Woodlawn, 8; No. 8 Douglass boys vs. No. 9 Randallstown, 9:30.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- This is worshiping with a twist.More than 800 people packed the auditorium of Theodore Roosevelt High School one recent Saturday. Dressed in jeans, sweats, T-shirts and sneakers, they applauded wildly for teen-agers who delivered a series of fast-clapping, foot-stomping, hallelujah-shouting dances.This is also stepping with a twist.Stepping -- a precision, cadenced dance in which performers establish a rhythm with lightning-speed hand and foot moves -- has long been a tradition at colleges with historically black fraternities and sororities.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2009
"The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America" Douglas Brinkley (HarperCollins, $34.99) Published in 1902, The Deer Family was packed with field observations of mule deer and elk herds and tales of derring-do. It also had a policy agenda. "All men who care for nature, no less than all men who care for big game hunting," Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed, should see to it that government preserves wilderness. Roosevelt did his part - and more. In his magnificent and magisterial biography, The Wilderness Warrior, Douglas Brinkley, a professor of history at Rice University, celebrates Roosevelt, a Harvard-trained zoologist, as a "pro-forest, pro-buffalo, cougar-infatuated, socialistic land conservationist."
TRAVEL
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,Special to the Sun | August 26, 2007
With all due respect to Frank Sinatra and his swaggering saunter of a song, "New York, New York," if there's one thing better than waking up in a city that never sleeps, it is never sleeping in a city that never sleeps. While planning my latest visit to Gotham, my list of everything I wanted to see, eat and buy grew so long, I realized my only choice was to disregard any need for that waste of time called slumber. Because I planned to visit on a Wednesday, the city's already vast menu of activities expanded further still, offering the opportunity to see both a Broadway matinee and a theatrical performance later that evening.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | November 3, 2006
A panorama of American life from the 1890s to about 1914, presented against a background of the popular music of that period. That's Tintypes, which Rep Stage is performing through Nov. 19 in Howard Community College's new black box theatre. Conceived by Mary Kyte, Mel Marvin and Gary Pearle, the show is a mixture of history, social commentary and nostalgia. The score includes old favorites such as "Meet Me in St. Louis," "In My Merry Oldsmobile," "A Bird in a Gilded Cage" and "Bill Bailey, Won't You Please Come Home."
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | July 6, 2006
A special issue of Time magazine celebrates the historic career of Theodore Roosevelt and the implications of his presidency for the development of American society. In the phony familiarity of our times, in which you call people by their first names when you have never even met them, the cover story in this issue is titled "Teddy." Theodore Roosevelt was indeed a landmark figure in the development of American politics and government, but in a very different sense from the way he is portrayed in Time.
NEWS
April 24, 2006
This year marks the 100th anniversary not only of the San Francisco quake but also of a political jolt that looked to be even more earth-shaking. President Theodore Roosevelt - whom the current occupant of the White House considers to be a hero and role model - sent an angry message to Congress calling for a graduated income tax, a graduated inheritance tax (Republicans didn't call it the "death tax" in those days), the removal of interstate corporations from weak control by the states by placing them under federal charters, and a ban on campaign contributions by any corporation.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2005
CRAWFORD, Texas -- It will be three years before George W. Bush becomes an ex-commander-in-chief, but he's already boning up on the post-retirement adventures of the Cowboy President. Bush is reading When Trumpets Call: Theodore Roosevelt After the White House by Patricia O'Toole while he relaxes at his Texas ranch during the week between Christmas and New Year's, the White House said yesterday. Roosevelt, who was only 50 when his second term ended in 1909, lived unusually large after leaving the White House, even by presidential standards.
NEWS
By Richard Striner | December 9, 1992
THERE is reason to believe that we are witnessing one of the recurring moments in American history when conservative-liberal polarization breaks down to a significant extent.A mood of impatient rebellion against the conservative-liberal rat race -- from the grassroots plea in the Richmond presidential debate for a cessation of mudslinging to the widespread search among intellectuals for "new paradigms" of ideological reconciliation -- was a clear and pervasive presence in the politics of 1992.
NEWS
May 26, 1993
Zoning panel delays action on bowling lanesThe Mount Airy Planning and Zoning Commission delayed action Monday on site plans for a proposed addition to Mount Airy Bowling Lanes.Owner Joseph Rineer has proposed adding 12 tenpin lanes on the west side of the building on Center Street. The bowling alley now has 12 duckpin lanes.Planning commission members asked Mr. Rineer to resubmit his plans after he addresses concerns about storm water management, forest conservation and parking.In other matters, the commission approved the final 100 lots of the Twin Ridge development, which is located off Route 144.The commission rescheduled its June meeting.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2005
He's got baseballs autographed by every American president since 1901, including the only known ball signed by Theodore Roosevelt and a few that were hurled as Opening Day first pitches. He's got Babe Ruth's 1920 bat, with indentations Ruth made each time he hit a home run. Remember George Brett's 1983 "pine tar" home run? He's got the can of pine tar. And while other collectors can boast that they have a copy of the first issue of Playboy featuring curvaceous Marilyn Monroe on its black-and-white cover, James Ancel has probably the only one signed by her husband, Joe DiMaggio.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | March 6, 2005
When Trumpets Call: Theodore Roosevelt After the White House By Patricia O'Toole. Simon & Schuster. 494 pages. $30. Jefferson's Secrets: Death and Desire at Monticello By Andrew Burstein. Basic Books. 351 pages. $25. Patricia O'Toole is a respected author who wanted to tackle a new biography of a much chronicled president, hoping to offer fresh interpretations for a new century. The president is Theodore Roosevelt. O'Toole has been fascinated by his life for decades, but rightly wondered if new material could be found, if already mined material could be reinterpreted in responsible, significant ways.
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