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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 12, 2004
Jazz hasn't been a hip thing in pop culture for more than 50 years - not since Duke Ellington, Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie were the undisputed kings of cool. These days, there are still young, vibrant jazz artists out there - Joshua Redman, Marcus Roberts and Jane Monheit among them. But it's a sure bet that none will crack Billboard's Hot 100. Jazz - the art and its relentlessly creative spirit - is not lost today. It may not be all over MTV or BET, but there still is a charged, exciting community out there pushing the music, keeping the proverbial flame burning.
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By Cathy Carter | January 24, 2013
When jazz musician Yosvany Terry talks about music education, his voice rises with emotion. "We need to focus on the younger generation," he said by phone from his home in New York City. "They are the ones who will carry the torch into the future. We must expose them to different musical traditions so they can learn how to utilize what's come before them. Then they will be able to fly higher with their own creations. " Considering his passionate stance, it's fitting the Cuban born saxophonist is the headliner Saturday, Jan. 26 for the 9th Annual Jazz @ The Lake concert.
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NEWS
January 11, 2001
Tenor-saxophonist Ron Holloway and his jazz group will open the 26th season of the Glenelg Concert Series at 8 p.m. Jan. 20 in Glenelg Country School's Mulitz Theater. The evening - filled with the music of Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk - will includes candlelight, flowers, wine and light refreshments. Tickets are $17 and may be held at the door with a reservation. Information: 410-531-2220, Ext. 2120. Scout troop sponsoring father-daughter dance Girl Scout Troop 921 will sponsor a Father-Daughter Snowflake Ball from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Clarksville Elementary School cafeteria.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 12, 2004
Jazz hasn't been a hip thing in pop culture for more than 50 years - not since Duke Ellington, Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie were the undisputed kings of cool. These days, there are still young, vibrant jazz artists out there - Joshua Redman, Marcus Roberts and Jane Monheit among them. But it's a sure bet that none will crack Billboard's Hot 100. Jazz - the art and its relentlessly creative spirit - is not lost today. It may not be all over MTV or BET, but there still is a charged, exciting community out there pushing the music, keeping the proverbial flame burning.
NEWS
February 7, 1995
Art Taylor, 65, a drummer whose crisp, hard-driving work is heard on classic recordings by John Coltrane, Bud Powell and Thelonious Monk, died suddenly yesterday in New York, friends said. Besides performing and pioneering modern jazz drumming, he was the author of a classic book of jazz interviews called "Notes and Tones." The book vividly set forth the concerns of America's jazz musicians -- from anguish and bitterness over racism to record company exploitation to worries over the loss of jazz musicians to drug use.John Smith, 63, who changed his name from Robert Earl Van Orden as a joke, then gained starring roles in the TV westerns "Laramie" and "Cimarron City," died Jan. 25 at his Los Angeles home of what was probably a combination of cirrhosis and heart problems, according to his former wife, actress Luana Patten Smith.
NEWS
By Richard M. Sudhalter and Richard M. Sudhalter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 1997
"Straight, No Chaser," by Leslie Gourse. Illustrated. Schirmer Books. 368 pages. $30.Jazz musicians, almost alone among performing artists, have had consistently bad luck with their biographers. Where those ,, who chronicle the lives of conductors and ballerinas, pointillists and prima donnas, bring often telling hands-on experience to the task, jazz artists seem ever at the mercy of what they themselves call "the civilians."This is lamentably true of "Straight, No Chaser," a new biography Thelonious Monk.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 7, 2004
Sporting burnt-orange eyeshadow, Mashica - she goes by her first name - sits in a Mount Vernon cafe. Dontae Winslow, her cornrowed husband, is across the table. In two weeks, the couple will drive to Los Angeles, where Winslow, a gifted trumpeter, will study for two years at the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz at the University of Southern California. "We're excited," Mashica says. "We're gonna make the best out of L.A. Plus, this is a great opportunity for Dontae." For about a decade, Winslow has played around Baltimore and produced eight CDs on his own label, Ransom Entertainment.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | November 20, 1990
THE "NOW'S the Time" Jazz Band, a pun made by Whit Williams when he formed his Baltimore band while thinking of a similarly named Charlie "Yardbird" Parker number, gave a slam-bang terrific show of American jazz Saturday at Frederick Douglas Senior High School.* The band played solos by smooth veterans like trumpeter Roy "Tangle" McCoy and vibes man Jimmy "Captain" Wells, dramatic young trumpeter Tom Williams and spirited vocalist Sheila Ford.* It did 24 tunes from Scott Joplin to avant garde with heavy respect paid Parker, Thelonious Monk, Duke Ellington, Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, Jimmy Heath, Cecil Bridgewater, Wayne Shorter, Ornette Coleman, Chick Webb and Dizzy Gillespie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 3, 1993
Even though music was always a part of his life, Joshua Redman never expected that it would be his living. "I knew I would always play music, and more importantly, I knew at least I would always listen to music, that would be an incredibly important part of my life," he says."
NEWS
By Cathy Carter | January 24, 2013
When jazz musician Yosvany Terry talks about music education, his voice rises with emotion. "We need to focus on the younger generation," he said by phone from his home in New York City. "They are the ones who will carry the torch into the future. We must expose them to different musical traditions so they can learn how to utilize what's come before them. Then they will be able to fly higher with their own creations. " Considering his passionate stance, it's fitting the Cuban born saxophonist is the headliner Saturday, Jan. 26 for the 9th Annual Jazz @ The Lake concert.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 7, 2004
Sporting burnt-orange eyeshadow, Mashica - she goes by her first name - sits in a Mount Vernon cafe. Dontae Winslow, her cornrowed husband, is across the table. In two weeks, the couple will drive to Los Angeles, where Winslow, a gifted trumpeter, will study for two years at the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz at the University of Southern California. "We're excited," Mashica says. "We're gonna make the best out of L.A. Plus, this is a great opportunity for Dontae." For about a decade, Winslow has played around Baltimore and produced eight CDs on his own label, Ransom Entertainment.
NEWS
January 11, 2001
Tenor-saxophonist Ron Holloway and his jazz group will open the 26th season of the Glenelg Concert Series at 8 p.m. Jan. 20 in Glenelg Country School's Mulitz Theater. The evening - filled with the music of Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk - will includes candlelight, flowers, wine and light refreshments. Tickets are $17 and may be held at the door with a reservation. Information: 410-531-2220, Ext. 2120. Scout troop sponsoring father-daughter dance Girl Scout Troop 921 will sponsor a Father-Daughter Snowflake Ball from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Clarksville Elementary School cafeteria.
NEWS
By Richard M. Sudhalter and Richard M. Sudhalter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 1997
"Straight, No Chaser," by Leslie Gourse. Illustrated. Schirmer Books. 368 pages. $30.Jazz musicians, almost alone among performing artists, have had consistently bad luck with their biographers. Where those ,, who chronicle the lives of conductors and ballerinas, pointillists and prima donnas, bring often telling hands-on experience to the task, jazz artists seem ever at the mercy of what they themselves call "the civilians."This is lamentably true of "Straight, No Chaser," a new biography Thelonious Monk.
NEWS
February 7, 1995
Art Taylor, 65, a drummer whose crisp, hard-driving work is heard on classic recordings by John Coltrane, Bud Powell and Thelonious Monk, died suddenly yesterday in New York, friends said. Besides performing and pioneering modern jazz drumming, he was the author of a classic book of jazz interviews called "Notes and Tones." The book vividly set forth the concerns of America's jazz musicians -- from anguish and bitterness over racism to record company exploitation to worries over the loss of jazz musicians to drug use.John Smith, 63, who changed his name from Robert Earl Van Orden as a joke, then gained starring roles in the TV westerns "Laramie" and "Cimarron City," died Jan. 25 at his Los Angeles home of what was probably a combination of cirrhosis and heart problems, according to his former wife, actress Luana Patten Smith.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 3, 1993
Even though music was always a part of his life, Joshua Redman never expected that it would be his living. "I knew I would always play music, and more importantly, I knew at least I would always listen to music, that would be an incredibly important part of my life," he says."
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | November 20, 1990
THE "NOW'S the Time" Jazz Band, a pun made by Whit Williams when he formed his Baltimore band while thinking of a similarly named Charlie "Yardbird" Parker number, gave a slam-bang terrific show of American jazz Saturday at Frederick Douglas Senior High School.* The band played solos by smooth veterans like trumpeter Roy "Tangle" McCoy and vibes man Jimmy "Captain" Wells, dramatic young trumpeter Tom Williams and spirited vocalist Sheila Ford.* It did 24 tunes from Scott Joplin to avant garde with heavy respect paid Parker, Thelonious Monk, Duke Ellington, Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, Jimmy Heath, Cecil Bridgewater, Wayne Shorter, Ornette Coleman, Chick Webb and Dizzy Gillespie.
NEWS
June 20, 2004
Jackie Paris, 79, a jazz vocalist who toured with Charlie Parker and was said to be one of the favorite singers of Ella Fitzgerald and comedian Lenny Bruce, died Thursday in Manhattan of complications of bone cancer. He worked with Lionel Hampton and Charles Mingus and was the first to sing the lyrics to Thelonious Monk's "'Round Midnight." Later, he taught master classes and gave private lessons while continuing to record and perform.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 1998
THE PERFECT image from a past holiday celebration includes a family packing a picnic basket and meeting friends at the local park to enjoy supper, visit and listen to a band.Relive the past at this year's first Linthicum Park summer concert at 6 p.m. today. The Barry Dove Jazz Quartet will entertain with a repertoire of big band, Latin, be-bop and contemporary improvisation. The quartet will perform original compositions and pieces by such greats as Chick Corea, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk and Charlie Parker.
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