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by Richard Gorelick | December 17, 2012
Check it out. Baltimore's DNA Theatre (Daydreams + Nightmares Aerial Theatre) is presenting 1920s Vintage Cabaret, a weekend-long fundraiser at the Theatre Project featuring live music, artisan cocktails and food. The cabaret benefits DNA Theatre's 2013 season of performances. The Jan. 5 show at 7:45 p.m. will inlcude a "Prohibition-inspired haute cuisine menu" prepared by David Bersch. The four-course menu includes oysters Rockefeller, risotto Etouffee, braised short ribs and, for dessert, a mousse duo. The 10 p.m. show on Saturday will feature a late-night lounge atmosphere with Baltimore's "sassiest burlesque performers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
It is impossible to avoid thinking about Sarah Kane's suicide by hanging in 1999 at the age of 28 when encountering the British playwright's final work, "4.48 Psychosis. " There's something at once real and surreal, disturbing and absorbing, about this roughly hour-long examination of mental illness, qualities that Iron Crow Theatre seizes upon in a darkly evocative production directed by Ryan Clark at Theatre Project. Kane's non-linear play is a kind of manic prose poem about people in various stages of mental illness; warnings and pleas seem to haunt every line.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By [BRAD SCHLEICHER] | May 29, 2008
The lowdown -- In Solo: A Two-Person Show, co-creators and performers Matt Chapman and Josh Matthews tell the tale of two brothers attempting to sort their way through the puzzling details of their last moments together and discover what may or may not have happened to each other. If you go -- Solo: A Two-Person Show will take place at 7 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sunday at Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St. The show is appropriate for ages 8 and older. Tickets are $10-$20.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Binnie Ritchie Holum, a dancer, choreographer, playwright and actress who had been a co-founder of the Baltimore Women's Theatre Project , died Sept. 21 at her parents' home near Saranac Lake, N.Y., of a gioblastoma, an aggressive brain tumor. She was 64. "Her talent was just endless and she had more energy than three people combined," said Harvey M. Doster, her collaborator, who is director of the International Baccalaureate Theater Program at St. Timothy's School in Stevenson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | September 24, 1993
'A Traveling Song'Where: Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St.When: Wednesdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m., matinees Sundays at 3 p.m. Through Oct. 10. Tickets: $14Call: (410) 752-8558** 1/25/8 Twenty-three years is a venerable age for a theater, particularly one that specializes in the avant-garde. So it seems fitting that the Theatre Project has launched its 23rd season with a show about the passing of time -- "A Traveling Song," created and performed by the Amsterdam-based Heriette Brouwers and Beppe Costa.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 10, 2004
With few words, no dialogue or plot and lots of highly evocative movement, Naoko Maeshiba Performance Collective's The Voyage is more dance than theater. But this Theatre Project presentation is also the type of work that deliberately defies categorization. The style might be described as surrealistic, and the subject matter appears to be nothing less than the voyage of life, with an emphasis on the stresses of relationships and change. Along the way, director/choreographer Naoko Maeshiba (a member of the theater faculty at Towson University)
FEATURES
November 14, 1990
The Trust for Mutual Understanding has awarded the Theatre Project a grant of $15,000 to support a collaborative project with Theatre Buffo, the Leningrad cabaret company that opened the company's '90-'91 season.The grant will fund the return of Gennady Vetrov, Theatre Buffo's leading actor, to the Theatre Project where he will present a new version of a one-man show he has been performing in Russia, Eastern Europe and the Scandinavian countries for the past two years.Theatre Project founder and artistic director Philip Arnoult will work as dramaturg with Vetrov and Theatre Buffo's founder and director, Isaak Shtokbant, to adapt the show so that it will be appreciated by American audiences.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | February 16, 1991
The Theatre Project, which has been presenting experimental works in Baltimore for 20 years, faces eviction from its Preston Street home for falling about $20,000 behind in its rent.However, both the theater and the landlord said yesterday that they expect to resolve the matter and stave off eviction."The Theatre Project is an avant-garde theater. They're not in the business to make money, but we have a mortgage to be paid," said Dan Henson, senior development director for the landlord, Struever Brothers Eccles & Rouse.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 18, 1995
After decades as one of the country's leading importers of avant-garde theater, the Theatre Project is entering its 25th anniversary season with a major change in mission: It will now focus on local work.The local companies that will be involved belong to what Philip Arnoult, Theatre Project founder and artistic director, calls "the Baltimore independent theater movement."The Theatre Project introduced a local residency program three seasons ago. The big change this season, however, is that instead of a smattering of local companies mixed between the national and international troupes, the just-announced 1995-1996 season consists almost entirely of local productions.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | February 27, 1995
Phillip Arnoult and his Theatre Project have long been a haven for area dancers and dance fans. In keeping with that tradition, Kinetics, the Howard County-based troupe, opened its premiere-laden and well-conceived concert of dances Thursday night.All but one of the five works -- Jan Van Dyke's "Round Dance" -- were new. Created in 1985 to music of Peter Gabriel, "Round Dance" shimmered with imagery culled from tribal rituals. Eight dancers, crouched about a circle of light, rhythmically pounded their hands on the floor or stomped their feet.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Baltimore's Theatre Project 2014-15 season features a mix of cutting-edge shows and those with an established track record. The line-up, which the theater's artistic team announced on Tuesday in a news release, ranges from Charlie Bethel's one-man version of Homer's "The Odyssey," to storyteller Jon Spelman's musings about mortality in "The Prostate Dialogues" to an operatic version of Jane Austen's novel, "Mansfield Park" performed by the...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Even in a group of overachievers, Monica Lopez-Gonzalez would likely stand out. The 30-year-old native Baltimorean has two bachelor's degrees - in French and psychology - and an M.A. and Ph.D. in cognitive science, all from the Johns Hopkins University, where she recently did a stint as a postdoctoral fellow researching "the cognitive neuroscience of artistic creativity. " "The joke among my friends is that I'm such a nerd that I will get another Ph.D. so I can put 'Ph.D.²' after my name," said Lopez-Gonzalez, who currently does consulting work in the field of data visualization.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2014
Ever wonder what the circus was like 70 years ago? Ask the performers of the Happenstance Theater. The visual, poetic theater company will be putting on its own version of what goes down under the big top with "Impossible! A Happenstance Circus," opening Friday and running through June 1 at Theatre Project . "The show is a theatrical collage of circus in the '30s and '40s. It's a bright and colorful evening, full of music, movement, humor, and wonder," said Gwen Grastorf, 32, of Takoma Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bret McCabe, For The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
" 'Occupy' is a big word, and, of course, when you say that to people it elicits a very specific thing," says Vincent Thomas. The dancer, choreographer and associate professor in Towson University's dance department sits in a North Baltimore coffee shop sipping chai and discussing his multimedia Occupy project, which makes its Baltimore debut Feb. 14-16 at the Theatre Project . He says the ideas that grew into this performance started a...
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
It has been a big week for the historic theaters of North Avenue. First the city announced it is moving forward with the Maryland Film Festival's plan to restore the Parkway Theatre. Now comes news that the state is chipping in a substantial sum toward the restoration of the Centre Theatre. The group that plans to turn the 1939 theater at 10. E. North Ave. into a multi-purpose arts space has been allocated $3 million in tax credits by the Maryland Historical Trust, a division of the state's planning department.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | December 17, 2012
Check it out. Baltimore's DNA Theatre (Daydreams + Nightmares Aerial Theatre) is presenting 1920s Vintage Cabaret, a weekend-long fundraiser at the Theatre Project featuring live music, artisan cocktails and food. The cabaret benefits DNA Theatre's 2013 season of performances. The Jan. 5 show at 7:45 p.m. will inlcude a "Prohibition-inspired haute cuisine menu" prepared by David Bersch. The four-course menu includes oysters Rockefeller, risotto Etouffee, braised short ribs and, for dessert, a mousse duo. The 10 p.m. show on Saturday will feature a late-night lounge atmosphere with Baltimore's "sassiest burlesque performers.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 10, 1991
Theater pieces by women, as well as Dutch dance and drama, will highlight the 1991-1992 Theatre Project season.Six of the 11 announced productions are by women, an emphasis that Theatre Project director Philip Arnoult described as unintentional but welcome.The distaff lineup begins with Nava Zuckerman's Tmu-Na Theater of Tel Aviv, returning for the fourth time with a new work, "Shelter" (Oct. 16-27), set in an Israeli shelter during the gulf war."Song of Absence in the Fall of the Ashen Reign" (Jan.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 9, 2005
Featuring companies from Australia to Afghanistan, the Theatre Project's 2005-2006 season will offer everything from updated adaptations of Shakespeare to autobiographical, one-woman shows. "I tend to look for a broad range of work," said producing director Anne Cantler Fulwiler, explaining that the shows will also vary stylistically. "There are pieces that emphasize the word, and there are pieces that are close to wordless." In addition, Fulwiler said the season will include several shows that demonstrate the theater's increased involvement in the creation of new work.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
Baltimore's cutting-edge theater scene just became a bit less razor-sharp. For the first time in more than 40 years, Spanish puppet troupes and headline-making performers who smear chocolate on their skin will have a hard time finding a stage where they can put on their shows. Primarily for economic reasons, Baltimore's venerable Theatre Project has quietly stopped bringing in experimental artists with global and national reputations. Instead, the 150-seat showhouse at 45 W. Preston St. is hosting local theater and regional dance companies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
William Donald Schaefer sang Baltimore's praises loudly, so it's only fitting that a new musical should be singing his. The title of "Do It Now!" — music by Baltimore Symphony Orchestra member Jonathan Jensen, book by Baltimore-born playwright Rich Espey — comes from Schaefer's signature phrase during his 1971-1987 tenure as mayor of the city. The musical, which gets a public reading Sunday at Theatre Project , remains a work in progress, but the focus on Schaefer's Baltimore career is firmly settled.
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